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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A System for Detecting, Preventing and Exposing Atomicity Violations in Multithreaded Programs

Chew, Lee 13 January 2010 (has links)
Multi-core machines have become common and have led to an increase in multithreaded software. In turn, the number of concurrency bugs has also increased. Such bugs are elusive and remain difficult to solve, despite existing research. Thus, this thesis proposes a system which detects, prevents and optionally helps expose concurrency bugs. Specifically, we focus on bugs caused by atomicity violations, which occur when thread interleaving violates the programmer’s assumption that a code section executes atomically. At compile-time, our system performs static analysis to identify code sections where violations could occur. At run-time, we use debug registers to monitor these sections for interleaving thread accesses which would cause a violation. If detected, we undo their effects and thus prevent the violation. Optionally, we help expose atomicity violations by perturbing thread scheduling during execution. Our results demonstrate that the system is effective and imposes low overhead.
2

A System for Detecting, Preventing and Exposing Atomicity Violations in Multithreaded Programs

Chew, Lee 13 January 2010 (has links)
Multi-core machines have become common and have led to an increase in multithreaded software. In turn, the number of concurrency bugs has also increased. Such bugs are elusive and remain difficult to solve, despite existing research. Thus, this thesis proposes a system which detects, prevents and optionally helps expose concurrency bugs. Specifically, we focus on bugs caused by atomicity violations, which occur when thread interleaving violates the programmer’s assumption that a code section executes atomically. At compile-time, our system performs static analysis to identify code sections where violations could occur. At run-time, we use debug registers to monitor these sections for interleaving thread accesses which would cause a violation. If detected, we undo their effects and thus prevent the violation. Optionally, we help expose atomicity violations by perturbing thread scheduling during execution. Our results demonstrate that the system is effective and imposes low overhead.
3

Effective fault localization techniques for concurrent software

Park, Sang Min 12 January 2015 (has links)
Multicore and Internet cloud systems have been widely adopted in recent years and have resulted in the increased development of concurrent programs. However, concurrency bugs are still difficult to test and debug for at least two reasons. Concurrent programs have large interleaving space, and concurrency bugs involve complex interactions among multiple threads. Existing testing solutions for concurrency bugs have focused on exposing concurrency bugs in the large interleaving space, but they often do not provide debugging information for developers to understand the bugs. To address the problem, this thesis proposes techniques that help developers in debugging concurrency bugs, particularly for locating the root causes and for understanding them, and presents a set of empirical user studies that evaluates the techniques. First, this thesis introduces a dynamic fault-localization technique, called Falcon, that locates single-variable concurrency bugs as memory-access patterns. Falcon uses dynamic pattern detection and statistical fault localization to report a ranked list of memory-access patterns for root causes of concurrency bugs. The overall Falcon approach is effective: in an empirical evaluation, we show that Falcon ranks program fragments corresponding to the root-cause of the concurrency bug as "most suspicious" almost always. In principle, such a ranking can save a developer's time by allowing him or her to quickly hone in on the problematic code, rather than having to sort through many reports. Others have shown that single- and multi-variable bugs cover a high fraction of all concurrency bugs that have been documented in a variety of major open-source packages; thus, being able to detect both is important. Because Falcon is limited to detecting single-variable bugs, we extend the Falcon technique to handle both single-variable and multi-variable bugs, using a unified technique, called Unicorn. Unicorn uses online memory monitoring and offline memory pattern combination to handle multi-variable concurrency bugs. The overall Unicorn approach is effective in ranking memory-access patterns for single- and multi-variable concurrency bugs. To further assist developers in understanding concurrency bugs, this thesis presents a fault-explanation technique, called Griffin, that provides more context of the root cause than Unicorn. Griffin reconstructs the root cause of the concurrency bugs by grouping suspicious memory accesses, finding suspicious method locations, and presenting calling stacks along with the buggy interleavings. By providing additional context, the overall Griffin approach can provide more information at a higher-level to the developer, allowing him or her to more readily diagnose complex bugs that may cross file or module boundaries. Finally, this thesis presents a set of empirical user studies that investigates the effectiveness of the presented techniques. In particular, the studies compare the effectiveness between a state-of-the-art debugging technique and our debugging techniques, Unicorn and Griffin. Among our findings, the user study shows that while the techniques are indistinguishable when the fault is relatively simple, Griffin is most effective for more complex faults. This observation further suggests that there may be a need for a spectrum of tools or interfaces that depend on the complexity of the underlying fault or even the background of the user.
4

Dynamic Analysis of Multithreaded Embedded Software to Expose Atomicity Violations

January 2016 (has links)
abstract: Concurrency bugs are one of the most notorious software bugs and are very difficult to manifest. Significant work has been done on detection of atomicity violations bugs for high performance systems but there is not much work related to detect these bugs for embedded systems. Although criteria to claim existence of bugs remains same, approach changes a bit for embedded systems. The main focus of this research is to develop a systemic methodology to address the issue from embedded systems perspective. A framework is developed which predicts the access interleaving patterns that may violate atomicity using memory references of shared variables and provides support to force and analyze these schedules for any output change, system fault or change in execution path. / Dissertation/Thesis / Masters Thesis Computer Science 2016
5

Methods for Modeling and Analyzing Concurrent Software

Zeng, Reng 02 July 2013 (has links)
Concurrent software executes multiple threads or processes to achieve high performance. However, concurrency results in a huge number of different system behaviors that are difficult to test and verify. The aim of this dissertation is to develop new methods and tools for modeling and analyzing concurrent software systems at design and code levels. This dissertation consists of several related results. First, a formal model of Mondex, an electronic purse system, is built using Petri nets from user requirements, which is formally verified using model checking. Second, Petri nets models are automatically mined from the event traces generated from scientific workflows. Third, partial order models are automatically extracted from some instrumented concurrent program execution, and potential atomicity violation bugs are automatically verified based on the partial order models using model checking. Our formal specification and verification of Mondex have contributed to the world wide effort in developing a verified software repository. Our method to mine Petri net models automatically from provenance offers a new approach to build scientific workflows. Our dynamic prediction tool, named McPatom, can predict several known bugs in real world systems including one that evades several other existing tools. McPatom is efficient and scalable as it takes advantage of the nature of atomicity violations and considers only a pair of threads and accesses to a single shared variable at one time. However, predictive tools need to consider the tradeoffs between precision and coverage. Based on McPatom, this dissertation presents two methods for improving the coverage and precision of atomicity violation predictions: 1) a post-prediction analysis method to increase coverage while ensuring precision; 2) a follow-up replaying method to further increase coverage. Both methods are implemented in a completely automatic tool.
6

A Method and Tool for Finding Concurrency Bugs Involving Multiple Variables with Application to Modern Distributed Systems

Sun, Zhuo 05 November 2018 (has links)
Concurrency bugs are extremely hard to detect due to huge interleaving space. They are happening in the real world more often because of the prevalence of multi-threaded programs taking advantage of multi-core hardware, and microservice based distributed systems moving more and more applications to the cloud. As the most common non-deadlock concurrency bugs, atomicity violations are studied in many recent works, however, those methods are applicable only to single-variable atomicity violation, and don't consider the specific challenge in distributed systems that have both pessimistic and optimistic concurrency control. This dissertation presents a tool using model checking to predict atomicity violation concurrency bugs involving two shared variables or shared resources. We developed a unique method inferring correlation between shared variables in multi-threaded programs and shared resources in microservice based distributed systems, that is based on dynamic analysis and is able to detect the correlation that would be missed by static analysis. For multi-threaded programs, we use a binary instrumentation tool to capture runtime information about shared variables and synchronization events, and for microservice based distributed systems, we use a web proxy to capture HTTP based traffic about API calls and the shared resources they access including distributed locks. Based on the detected correlation and runtime trace, the tool is powerful and can explore a vast interleaving space of a multi-threaded program or a microservice based distributed system given a small set of captured test runs. It is applicable to large real-world systems and can predict atomicity violations missed by other related works for multi-threaded programs and a couple of previous unknown atomicity violation in real world open source microservice based systems. A limitation is that redundant model checking may be performed if two recorded interleaved traces yield the same partial order model.
7

Dynamická detekce a léčení časově závislých chyb nad daty v prostředí Java / Dynamic Data Race Detection and Self-Healing in Java Programs

Letko, Zdeněk January 2008 (has links)
Finding concurrency bugs in complex software is difficult. As a contribution to coping with this problem the thesis proposes an architecture for a fully automated dynamic detection and healing of data races and atomicity violations in Java. Two distinct algorithms for detecting of data races are presented. One of them is a novel algorithm called AtomRace which detects data races as a special case of atomicity violations. The healing is based on suppressing a recurrence of the detected problem and can be performed by introducing an additional synchronization or by legally influencing the Java scheduler. Basically forces certain parts of the code  to be executed atomically. The proposed architecture uses bytecode instrumentation to be able to track and influence the execution. The architecture and algorithms were implemented and tested on multiple case studies.
8

Pokročilá statická analýza atomičnosti v paralelních programech v prostředí Facebook Infer / Advanced Static Analysis of Atomicity in Concurrent Programs through Facebook Infer

Harmim, Dominik January 2021 (has links)
Nástroj Atomer je statický analyzátor založený na myšlence, že pokud jsou některé sekvence funkcí vícevláknového programu prováděny v některých bězích pod zámky, je pravděpodobně zamýšleno, že mají být vždy provedeny atomicky. Analyzátor Atomer se tudíž snaží takové sekvence hledat a poté zjišťovat, pro které z nich může být v některých jiných bězích programu porušena atomicita. Autor této diplomové práce ve své bakalářské práci navrhl a implementoval první verzi nástroje Atomer jako zásuvný modul aplikačního rámce Facebook Infer. V této diplomové práci je navržena nová a výrazně vylepšená verze analyzátoru Atomer. Cílem vylepšení je zvýšení jak škálovatelnosti, tak přesnosti. Kromě toho byla přidána podpora pro několik původně nepodporovaných programovacích vlastností (včetně např. možnosti analyzovat programy napsané v jazycích C++ a Java nebo podpory pro reentrantní zámky nebo stráže zámků, tzv. "lock guards"). Prostřednictvím řady experimentů (včetně experimentů s reálnými programy a reálnými chybami) se ukázalo, že nová verze nástroje Atomer je skutečně mnohem obecnější, přesnější a lépe škáluje.

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