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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The effect of bibliotherapy through listening in reducing fears of young children

Ongoa, Esther Ruth, 1930- January 1979 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to determine whether techniques used in bibliotherapy through listening would be effective in reducing the fears manifested by young children three to five years of age.The following two hypotheses were tested:Hypothesis 1. There is no significant difference between the mean adjusted posttest scores on the Link Children's Fear Scale of a group of young children experiencing bibliotherapy through listening to reduce expressed fears and a group of young children experiencing neutral stories.Hypothesis 2. There is no significant difference between the mean adjusted posttest scores on the Link Children's Fear Scale of a group of young children experiencing bibliotherapy through listening to reduce expressed fears and a non-treatment group of young children.Three groups of children were involved in the study. The experimental bibliotherapy through listening group (N=28) listened to stories related to fears which young children experience. Following each story there was time for discussion concerning feelings and reactions to the story. The neutral story group (N=28) listened to stories of general content not stressing fear and participated in follow-up discussion. The non-treatment group (N=25) were involved only in pretesting and posttesting. Changes in responses by members of the three groups were compared using a pretest/ posttest statistical design.All eighty-one children in the study attended a Day Care Center and were randomly assigned to one of three groups for this investigation. The population contained a varied intellectual racial and socio-economic blend of students. The story reading and discussion sessions met biweekly for eight weeks with the treatment groups sharing a total of sixteen books. Pupils'in each age level were read to separately in order for small numbers to be maintained for story reading and discussion.The Link Children's Fear Scale, designed to measure fears common to kindergarten children, was administered individually as a pretest and posttest. The instrument contains twenty-four questions requiring a positive or negative response. The questions relate to fear of the dark, fear of death, fear of animals and fear of being left alone. The instrument has a maximum score of twenty-four points. Higher scores are interpreted as indicative of a greater number of fears. Link's instrument was judged to have face validity by authorities and personnel in the field of early childhood education. Construct validity was established by factor analysis with a reliability coefficient of .70.Analysis of covariance was the statistical treatments applied to the data collected. In order to determine whether the hypotheses as stated should be accepted or rejected an a priori comparison was applied. The Bonferroni t statistic (as reported in Roger E. Kirk in Experimental Design: Procedures for the Behavioral Sciences) was utilized.The results of the analysis indicated there was a significant difference in the adjusted mean posttest score of a group of young children experiencing bibliotherapy through listening and the adjusted mean posttest score of a group of young children experiencing neutral stories. There was also a significant difference in the adjusted mean posttest score of a group of young children experiencing bibliotherapy through listening and the adjusted mean posttest score of a non-treatment group of children.
2

Bibliotherapy outcomes the effects of guided reading for education, counseling, and therapy /

Schrank, Fredrick A. January 1980 (has links)
Thesis--University of Wisconsin--Madison. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 161-178).
3

A meta-analysis of the literature on the use of bibliotherapy in conjunction with short-term therapy in a university counseling center setting

Glaman, Juley A. January 1998 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis--PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 1998. / Includes bibliographical references.
4

A practice model of using literature as a healing mode for helping cancer patients to attain rehabilitation /

Chung, Mo-lan, Maureen. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.W.)--University of Hong Kong, 2000. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 111-117).
5

Distant voices on fiction and therapy /

Bigerton, Michael John, January 1999 (has links)
Thesis (M. Div. in Christian Care and Counseling)--Emmanuel School of Religion, Johnson City, Tenn., 1999. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 218-220).
6

Incorporating bibliotherapy into the classroom a handbook for educators /

McEncroe, Melissa. January 2007 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.Ed.)--Regis University, Denver, Colo., 2007. / Title from PDF title page (viewed on Oct. 29, 2007). Includes bibliographical references.
7

A comparison of two bibliotherapeutic strategies to reduce the fears of young children

Pearson, Lucy Jackson 03 June 2011 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to compare two bibliotherapeutic strategies (audio-only and audio-visual) as a means of reducing the reported fears of young children. Books and audio-visual materials selected for use were based on content related to young children's fears.The following null hypothesis was tested:There is no significant difference between the mean posttest scores on the Children's Fear Survey Schedule for:1. A group of children 3, 4, and 5 years of age in a selected child care center who have received 4 weeks of biweekly sessions of bibliotherapeutic intervention to reduce fears through hearing selected stories read aloud.2. A group of children 3, 4, and 5 years of age in a selected child care center who have received 4 weeks of biweekly sessions of bibliotherapeutic intervention to reduce fears through an audio-visual mode.3. A comparison group of children 3, 4, and 5 years of age in a selected child care received no intervention.The sample numbered 65 children who completed both significantly different, thus a one-way analysis of variance was used to test the hypothesis.Findings1. Results of the posttest (Children's Fear Survey Schedule) indicated a reduction in fear level by children in both bibliotherapeutic intervention strategies.2. The reduction was most notable in the group receiving bibliotherapy through the audio-only mode.3. Differences between the audio-only group and the comparison group were statistically significant at the .05 level of confidence.Children who participated in bibliotherapy through an audio-visual mode also showed a reduction in fear level but not to a significant degree. Children in the comparison group who received no intervention showed an increase in reported fears.Conclusions and RecommendationsIt would appear that there are beneficial effects of reading aloud to children to reduce children's fears. Further study was recommended in the following areas:Development of a more precise instrument, application of the strategies to different age groups, and analysis of results to identify possible differences between gender of subjects.
8

The effects of bibliotherapy on self-concepts of children and youth in an institutional setting / Bibliotherapy on self-concepts of children and youth in an institutional setting

Garrett, Jerry E. 03 June 2011 (has links)
There is no abstract available for this dissertation.
9

The effect of bibliotherapy in reducing the fears of kindergarten children

Link, Mary S. January 1976 (has links)
The purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of bibliotherapy in reducing the fears of kindergarten children.The experimental design of the study compared three groups using pretest/posttest measures: 1) The Experimental group was an intact class of kindergarten students. The treatment for the group involved reading books on fear related subjects to the students and then having follow-up discussions concerning the book and the children's feelings. The treatment was conducted on a biweekly basis for eight weeks. 2) Control group I was an intact class of kindergarten students. The treatment for the group involved reading books of non-fear related subjects to the students and then having follow-up discussions concerning the book and the children's feelings. The treatment was conducted on a biweekly basis for eight weeks. 3) Control group II represented students from two intact classes of kindergarten students who had the same teacher and had received parental permission to participate in the study. There was no treatment for Control group II. The Experimental group and Control group I were randomly assigned treatment.The Link Children's Fear Scale was administered as a pretest and posttest. The instrument was developed from fifty items which purport to measure children's fears. Factor analysis was employed utilizing principal axes components to estimate the number of factors needed to best explain the total variation in the items. Using squared multiple correlations as initial communality estimates, the principal axes. analysis suggested a two factor solution. An Oblimin rotation was used. Those items which loaded above .30 were selected and retained in the revised instrument. The instrument in its final form consisted of twenty-four items. An example of an item: "Do you like to sleep with a light on?" The response mode was the child's indication yes or no.The factor analysis described above attests to the construct validity of the instrument. Face validity and sampling validity had previously been determined. The test-retest reliability of the instrument was calculated from kindergarten students who did not receive treatment. A reliability coefficient of .70 was obtained.The design for the study attempted to control for all variables other than treatment received. The Experimental group and Control group I were supervised by the same kindergarten teacher. A Reader/Discussion Leader, certificated as an elementary teacher, read the selected books and led the follow-up discussions for the Experimental group and Control group I. The Experimental group and Control group I followed the same procedure of hearing a book read by the Reader/Discussion Leader and then participated in a follow-up discussion of the book, as a part of each treatment session.The hypothesis was stated in the study as follows: There is no difference between the mean adjusted posttest scores of kindergarten students who received bibliotherapy to reduce childhood fears and the mean adjusted posttest scores of kindergarten students who did not receive bibliotherapy, where the means have been adjusted on the basis of the pretest scores.To test the hypothesis an analysis of covariance was used. The pretest served as the covariate and the posttest was the criterion.The analysis showed that the pretests for all groups differed significantly (.001) from the posttests. However, the group effects were not significant at the .05 level, thus indicating no difference between the experimental and control groups. The hypothesis was not rejected.
10

A study of the effects of selected readings upon children's academic performances and social adjustment

Schultheis, Miriam January 1969 (has links)
There is no abstract available for this dissertation.

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