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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

Field and glasshouse studies of aphids on the interaction of partial plant resistance and biological control

Gowling, G. R. January 1989 (has links)
No description available.
12

Genetic variation in the nematophagous fungus Verticillium chlamydosporium from southern European soils and molecular characterisation of the protease VCP1

Morton, Charles Oliver January 2002 (has links)
No description available.
13

Initial frequencies of alleles for resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins in field populations of Plutella xylostella and Helicoverpa armigera / by Mahmood Ahmad.

Ahmad, Mahmood January 1999 (has links)
Leaves 101-104 are misnumbered. / Bibliography: leaves 155-215. / xiii, 215 leaves : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. / Title page, contents and abstract only. The complete thesis in print form is available from the University Library. / In this study thirteen populations of P. xylostella from crucifer growing areas of Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia and Western Australia were surveyed for resistance to Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) toxins using a leaf-dip bioassay method. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Adelaide, Dept. of Applied and Molecular Ecology, 2000
14

Initial frequencies of alleles for resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins in field populations of Plutella xylostella and Helicoverpa armigera / by Mahmood Ahmad.

Ahmad, Mahmood January 1999 (has links)
Leaves 101-104 are misnumbered. / Bibliography: leaves 155-215. / xiii, 215 leaves : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. / Title page, contents and abstract only. The complete thesis in print form is available from the University Library. / In this study thirteen populations of P. xylostella from crucifer growing areas of Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia and Western Australia were surveyed for resistance to Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) toxins using a leaf-dip bioassay method. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Adelaide, Dept. of Applied and Molecular Ecology, 2000
15

The effects of biofeedback plus progressive relaxation on the emotional well-being of college students

Stoltz, Scott. January 2000 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis--PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2000. / Includes bibliographical references.
16

Biology and behaviour of the parasitoid Anagyrus kamali Moursi (Hymenoptera:Encyrtidae) / Biology and behaviour of Anagyrus kamali

Sagarra, Laurent A. January 1999 (has links)
The parasitoid Anagyrus kamali Moursi [Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae] has been recently introduced into the Caribbean as a biological control agent against the Hibiscus Mealybug (HMB), Maconellicoccus hirsutus Green [Homoptera: Pseudococcidae]. Information on this parasitoid is scarce and investigations of its biology and behaviour were conducted to optimize its mass-production, and improve our understanding of the A. kamali/M. hirsutus system. Host selection experiments showed that, of nine species tested, HMB was the only suitable mealybug species for A. kamali development. Third nymphal instar was the optimal stage for wasp mass-production since A. kamali progeny from this stage had a female biased sex ratio and it had a weaker immune response as evidenced by lower encapsulation rate than adult female HMB. Parasitoid functional response was of type III in variable-time conditions, ensuring the preservation of HMB population at low density, and of type II--III in fixed-time conditions, leading to a better use of HMB population in mass-rearing. Temperature and photoperiod had a profound impact on parasitoid fecundity, 26°C and LD 0:24 being the optimal condition to maximize A. kamali oviposition. Parasitoid body size was positively correlated to its fitness. Large parasitoids lived significantly longer, had a higher fecundity, and progeny emergence with a lower sex ratio than small ones. Studies on mating showed that A. kamali is arrhenotokous and that multiple mating is required to optimize progeny sex ratio. Progeny production by mated females was also higher than that of virgin females. Female parasitoid fecundity was negatively correlated to their density due to mutual interference. Under mass-rearing conditions, 75 female A. kamali per cage was the optimum. Finally, under stored condition, food supply and low temperature (20°C) appeared essential to sustain parasitoid longevity. However, storage periods up to 14 days did not affect parasitoid lifetime fec
17

Evaluation of adult carabid beetles (Coleoptera:Carabidae) as predators of the carrot weevil, Listronotus oregonensis (Coleoptera:Curculionidae)

Baines, Danica Darlene Sonya January 1987 (has links)
No description available.
18

Investigation of Aleochara bipustulata (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) adult diet and community interactions

Andreassen, Lars David 25 October 2013 (has links)
The exotic cabbage maggot (CM) infests canola on the prairies, feeding on roots in its larval stage, which disrupts the uptake of nutrients and water and provides an entry point for fungal plant pathogens. The European staphylinid, Aleochara bipustulata L., may be introduced for control of CM, but only if the risk to other species is low and if A. bipustulata has demonstrable potential to increase mortality already caused by natural enemies in Canada. Aleochara bipustulata could contribute to pest management as a predator of CM eggs and larvae, and as a parasitoid of CM puparia; however, it could affect non-pest species in the same two ways. A variety of invertebrates that share the soil of Brassica fields with immature CM were screened in laboratory no-choice assays to determine what adult A. bipustulata eat. In these assays, immobile or barely mobile invertebrates were accepted regularly and could be at risk. The majority of groups were seldom or never consumed. Also, a molecular assay developed to test for CM DNA in the guts of field-collected A. bipustulata revealed its high potential as a predator, and a similar assay developed for two carabid beetle species showed these to be seldom if ever consumed. Laboratory and field cage assays with other CM egg predators showed A. bipustulata has potential to disrupt other species, particularly the closely related A. bilineata Gyllenhal, as they seem to forage in similar microhabitats. Measurements of field-collected beetles indicate CM is unlikely to be the primary host in Europe, so introducing A. bipustulata to Canada may bring risks to non-target Diptera species. This was observed even though a series of laboratory experiments demonstrated CM is a superior and preferred host relative to the smaller, acalyptrate cheese skipper.
19

The chitinolytic system in Metarhizium anisopliae

Valadares, Maria Cleria Cordeiro January 1995 (has links)
No description available.
20

A study of Xanthium insects to be used in the biological control of cockleburs in Australia

Kelly, Samuel Greenberry January 1930 (has links)
No description available.

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