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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
51

Factors Underlying Chinese Hidden Champions in China : Case Study

Yu, Huahong Jr, Chen, Yun Jr January 2009 (has links)
<p>The term of Hidden Champions was first put forward by Simon (1996a) in his book and has already been a well-studied subject all over the world. The purpose of this dissertation is to figure out what are the main factors underlying Chinese Hidden Champions. </p><p>The literature part is composed of earlier research on Hidden Champions and theories on several factors that have been identified by authors, which form an analytical framework for analyzing empirical data.</p><p>Conducting a qualitative approach, the empirical data was collected through semi-structured telephone interviews with the senior personnel of two Chinese companies. Secondary data, such as public reports, also played a complementary role.</p><p>The findings of this study showed the factors of clear goal, excellent entrepreneur, focused strategy, sustained innovation, globalization and customer orientation immensely affect the success of Chinese Hidden Champions. It was also pointed out that there remain some views that are different from concepts of Simon’s.</p>
52

Jag kan inte sjunga : En fallstudie om mentala hinder kring sång

Danielsson, Karin January 2008 (has links)
<p>This is a case study about a singing student who was certain she could not learn to sing. The student had built up great mental obstacles around her singing ability, and the study brings up these obstacles and the processes involved while trying to overcome them.</p><p>The purpose of this study is to look into the train of thoughts around the teaching and the exercises used. The study also illuminates the processes the student and the teacher went through together, and discusses their meaning and consequence.</p><p>The study is based on notes made by the teacher during 30 lessons, spread out over a period of about two years, and reflections made by the teacher and the student afterwards.</p><p>The result shows some of the processes formed during the work, and that the student could manage more than she thought was possible by developing the right attitude and by gaining access to suitable tools.</p>
53

Jag kan inte sjunga : En fallstudie om mentala hinder kring sång

Danielsson, Karin January 2008 (has links)
This is a case study about a singing student who was certain she could not learn to sing. The student had built up great mental obstacles around her singing ability, and the study brings up these obstacles and the processes involved while trying to overcome them. The purpose of this study is to look into the train of thoughts around the teaching and the exercises used. The study also illuminates the processes the student and the teacher went through together, and discusses their meaning and consequence. The study is based on notes made by the teacher during 30 lessons, spread out over a period of about two years, and reflections made by the teacher and the student afterwards. The result shows some of the processes formed during the work, and that the student could manage more than she thought was possible by developing the right attitude and by gaining access to suitable tools.
54

Factors Underlying Chinese Hidden Champions in China : Case Study

Yu, Huahong Jr, Chen, Yun Jr January 2009 (has links)
The term of Hidden Champions was first put forward by Simon (1996a) in his book and has already been a well-studied subject all over the world. The purpose of this dissertation is to figure out what are the main factors underlying Chinese Hidden Champions. The literature part is composed of earlier research on Hidden Champions and theories on several factors that have been identified by authors, which form an analytical framework for analyzing empirical data. Conducting a qualitative approach, the empirical data was collected through semi-structured telephone interviews with the senior personnel of two Chinese companies. Secondary data, such as public reports, also played a complementary role. The findings of this study showed the factors of clear goal, excellent entrepreneur, focused strategy, sustained innovation, globalization and customer orientation immensely affect the success of Chinese Hidden Champions. It was also pointed out that there remain some views that are different from concepts of Simon’s.
55

A study of grade three and five students' strategic use of spelling knowledge

Kernaghan, Tracy M. 17 September 2007
Spelling is often a lightning rod in discussions on literacy. The general public, as well as educators, often judge the state of literacy by the occurrence of accurate, conventional spelling (Templeton & Morris, 1999). The purpose of this study was to reveal how students employ strategies in their spelling and how spelling strategies were being taught in their classrooms. This study also sought to uncover teachers, parents, and students perspectives and knowledge regarding spelling.<p>Case studies of six elementary school students were conducted. Each student was interviewed, along with their teachers and one of their parents. Students also filled out a self-reflection form. Students and teachers were observed in their classroom setting.<p>Findings indicated that students used a variety of strategies. The primary strategy articulated was sounding out; the better spellers also used analogy and visualization. Students knew and often used the strategies encouraged by their teachers and parents. The literature linked the processes of reading, spelling and writing. Most of the participants mentioned the connection between reading and spelling, but failed to recognize the importance of writing for spelling. A third finding was that the teachers had adopted new methods for teaching spelling but had not altered their role to provide for increased learning.<p> Implications for practice include suggestions for combined methods for teaching spelling, explicit teaching of strategies for all students, and teacher education that includes reflection and action (Ritchie & Wilson, 2000, p. 88).
56

A Case study examination of managerial activities in four UK trade unions formed by merger

Dempsey, Michael 04 1900 (has links)
In 1985, the researcher took up employment in what he regarded as a senior management position as Assistant General Secretary (Administration) of NALGO, the public service union. The objective was to gain management experience alongside continuing management education. Whilst there were others seeking to manage to the best of their ability, the idea was not universally accepted. However, the union, by the end of the decade, had embarked on management development courses for senior managers and by the time it merged and became part of UNISON, managerial activities were visible in many areas. It was not, however, clear the extent to which – if at all – such phenomena were observable in other trade unions. The literature did not help in this respect. Research to establish whether trade union managers existed and, if so, what their roles were appeared to offer the prospect of examining a new area of trade union life. This research is based on interviews with 56 senior trade union staff in four trade unions formed by merger – CWU, PCS, UNiFI and UNISON. Only one of those individuals professed not to accept a managerial role and that person accepted that he had a responsibility to ensure that the union was managed. Original findings include the following:- • There is a category of employee in trade unions known as a ‘trade union manager’, a role not previously identified by empirical research and discussed in the literature. • Trade union management develops depending on the level of institutional support. In the case study unions, there were links between this and the stage of merger that the unions had reached. Prior to institutional acceptance, there are managers who do their best to manage, operating in something of a cocoon. • Trade union managers espouse trade union principles which include the notion of fairness, imputing a concern for the way people are treated, including the staff for whom they are responsible. • Management remains in many ways a problematic concept in trade unions, leading often to its undervaluation. Trade union managers may perceive that it involves the exercise of power of the powerless, judgment on the weak. Trade union managers may as a result be ambivalent at being judgmental and, consequently, at managing conduct or performance. • Trade union managers manage stakeholders in polyarchal organisations but boundaries with lay activists are unclear; they engage in contests to define those boundaries and to manage what they regard as their own responsibilities. • Boundaries may include those relating to conflictual relations, constitutional boundaries, moveable boundaries, staff boundaries and policy/political boundaries.
57

Reclaiming Michael: a case study of a student with emotional behavioural disorder

Braun, Carol R. 28 January 2005 (has links)
"Reclaiming Michael: a case study of a student with emotional behavioural disorder" describes the work in a school with a kindergarten to grade three student who was labeled emotionally-behaviourally disordered. Thirteen participant interviews were transcribed and analyzed to understand what the school did, how the school did this work, and why the work was done the way it was. Two themes reinforcing the importance of learning and building community emerged from the data. The data collected reinforced the general principles of both the ecological and humanistic perspectives, indicating theoretical possibilities for work with students with emotional-behavioural disorders in other schools. / February 2005
58

A study of grade three and five students' strategic use of spelling knowledge

Kernaghan, Tracy M. 17 September 2007 (has links)
Spelling is often a lightning rod in discussions on literacy. The general public, as well as educators, often judge the state of literacy by the occurrence of accurate, conventional spelling (Templeton & Morris, 1999). The purpose of this study was to reveal how students employ strategies in their spelling and how spelling strategies were being taught in their classrooms. This study also sought to uncover teachers, parents, and students perspectives and knowledge regarding spelling.<p>Case studies of six elementary school students were conducted. Each student was interviewed, along with their teachers and one of their parents. Students also filled out a self-reflection form. Students and teachers were observed in their classroom setting.<p>Findings indicated that students used a variety of strategies. The primary strategy articulated was sounding out; the better spellers also used analogy and visualization. Students knew and often used the strategies encouraged by their teachers and parents. The literature linked the processes of reading, spelling and writing. Most of the participants mentioned the connection between reading and spelling, but failed to recognize the importance of writing for spelling. A third finding was that the teachers had adopted new methods for teaching spelling but had not altered their role to provide for increased learning.<p> Implications for practice include suggestions for combined methods for teaching spelling, explicit teaching of strategies for all students, and teacher education that includes reflection and action (Ritchie & Wilson, 2000, p. 88).
59

Customer Relationship Management : A Case Study on AGA GAS AB

Gilani, Wahid, Nagy, Csilla January 2012 (has links)
Background: Customer Relationship Management is a relatively new concept in the area of management.CRM is not an easy process; it is strategic approach that is concerned to create shareholder value through developing long-term relationship with key customers and customer segments. CRM is an integrated cross-functional approach which needs to combine various parts/ components inside the company in order for the CRM to function properly Purpose &amp; Research Questions: The purpose of this thesis is to contribute towards a better understanding of CRM implementation. With the research question: ―How can the key components (people, process and technology) measure Customer Relationship Management? Methodology: This is a qualitative study, with a deductive approach. Case study was conducted inside the organization AGA GAS AB. Conclusion: As the aim of this study was to contribute towards a better understanding of CRM implementation, therefore, it requires CRM to be evaluated. The CRM components should be investigated inside an organization and recognize if they have a good integration and cooperation amongst one another. This can be viewed by taking use of an interview guide that also incorporates the topics of Balance Scorecard.
60

Case study on teaching Mandarin learning-area in resource rooms in elementary school

Chang, Wen-tsan 10 July 2010 (has links)
Case study on teaching Mandarin learning-area in resource rooms in elementary school Abstract This study adopted case study approach to observe on-site two elementary resource room teachers in teaching Mandarin learning-area. Further, through class observation, formal/informal interviews, and the researcher¡¦s reflections, the teachers¡¦ practices of teaching methods, teaching content analysis, curriculum planning, teaching priority setting, preparation, and other teaching related factors were discussed. Data were analyzed according to the subjects of the content. The major findings are as follows: 1. In case A, the teacher had outstanding performance on game-oriented teaching. The interaction between the teacher and students was natural and energetic. The fun-way teaching method lighted up the class atmosphere and improved students¡¦ learning effect; children were willing to actively participate in the learning process when encouraged by incentive system. 2. In case B, the teacher effectively guided students to summarizing main points, often using spiral curriculum to connect one teaching subject to another. Children learned through down-to-earth teaching steps, and the learning results were presented through an item-by-item writing mode from the teacher. 3. The teacher of case A extended the teaching content with a broad variety and diversity while the teacher of case B wrapped up teaching highlights in every respect. Both teachers combined the textbooks with the information and knowledge of other fields, thereby effectively intensifying and broadening students¡¦ learning. Thus, they helped enrich the students¡¦ everyday knowledge and views. 4. The teacher of case A focused on the learning of Mandarin characters, phonetics, interpretation, phrase usage, and sentence making. The goal was to strengthen students¡¦ basic abilities. The teacher of case B stressed on cultivation of students¡¦ listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Both teachers followed their selected teaching curriculum programs in line with their pre-set teaching priorities. 5. Both teachers designed learning worksheets in conjunction with the teaching content to help students practice repeatedly in the learning process. They also individually taught and guided special students. Keywords: Resource room, Mandarin learning-area, case study

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