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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The effects of insecurity, task ambiguity, and sex on conformity

Hunter, Kenneth Robert January 1968 (has links)
Typescript. / Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Hawaii, 1968. / Bibliography: leaves 62-67. / ix, 80 l graphs, tables
2

An experimental study of resistance to influence

Zipf, Sheila Murray Gordon, January 1958 (has links)
Thesis--University of Michigan. / Includes bibliographical references. Also issued in print.
3

An experimental study of resistance to influence

Zipf, Sheila Murray Gordon, January 1958 (has links)
Thesis--University of Michigan. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
4

The effectiveness of two strategies in producing conforming behavior

Fahlberg, Nancy Lorraine, January 1966 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1966. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
5

The effects of private and nonpresent social support on conformity

Feldman, Robert S., January 1972 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1972. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
6

Does Conforming Make Us More Liked? Perceptions of Conformist and Non-conformist Behaviour

Leone, Tullia 30 August 2010 (has links)
Although social psychologists have long argued that conformity is motivated by a concern for social approval, very few studies have tested whether conformity actually results in increased approval of the conformist. The present research examined participants’ evaluations of confederates who displayed either conformist or non-conformist behaviour. Studies 1 and 2 used a music task, in which remote confederates either conformed or did not conform to participants’ choices for favourite music clips. Participants evaluated confederates by rating them on a series of both positive and negative descriptors. Relative to non-conformists, conformists were rated more favourably on items that referred to ‘liking’ (e.g., likeableness, willingness to befriend) (Studies 1 & 2), and less favourably on items that referred to “independence” (e.g., independence, originality, strength) (Study 2). Interestingly, although conforming confederates were judged as less independent than were confederates who simply agreed with (rather than conformed to) participants’ choices, conformity did not have a positive effect on liking over and above mere agreement (Study 2). Conformity, rather than being a means of gaining approval, might be better construed as a means of avoiding disapproval. Study 2 further examined evaluations made by observers who were exposed to the same confederate behaviours as were targets; however, no observer-target difference in ratings was found. Study 3 assessed the degree to which participants valued the traits that they ascribed to people who demonstrated either conformist or non-conformist behaviour. Positive traits associated with conformist behaviour (e.g., agreeableness, cooperativeness) were reported as having a more positive effect on participants’ liking of a person than were positive traits associated with non-conformist behaviour (e.g., independence, originality). Furthermore, in determining their liking for a conformist, participants reported placing more importance on the conformist’s possessing the positive traits associated with conforming than on their possessing the negative traits associated with conforming (e.g., dependence, passivity). In spite of their lack of independence, therefore, conformists in Study 2 were liked because participants placed more value on the virtuous aspects of conformity (e.g., agreeableness, cooperativeness). Implications for our culture’s ambivalent attitudes toward both conformity and independence are discussed.
7

Does Conforming Make Us More Liked? Perceptions of Conformist and Non-conformist Behaviour

Leone, Tullia 30 August 2010 (has links)
Although social psychologists have long argued that conformity is motivated by a concern for social approval, very few studies have tested whether conformity actually results in increased approval of the conformist. The present research examined participants’ evaluations of confederates who displayed either conformist or non-conformist behaviour. Studies 1 and 2 used a music task, in which remote confederates either conformed or did not conform to participants’ choices for favourite music clips. Participants evaluated confederates by rating them on a series of both positive and negative descriptors. Relative to non-conformists, conformists were rated more favourably on items that referred to ‘liking’ (e.g., likeableness, willingness to befriend) (Studies 1 & 2), and less favourably on items that referred to “independence” (e.g., independence, originality, strength) (Study 2). Interestingly, although conforming confederates were judged as less independent than were confederates who simply agreed with (rather than conformed to) participants’ choices, conformity did not have a positive effect on liking over and above mere agreement (Study 2). Conformity, rather than being a means of gaining approval, might be better construed as a means of avoiding disapproval. Study 2 further examined evaluations made by observers who were exposed to the same confederate behaviours as were targets; however, no observer-target difference in ratings was found. Study 3 assessed the degree to which participants valued the traits that they ascribed to people who demonstrated either conformist or non-conformist behaviour. Positive traits associated with conformist behaviour (e.g., agreeableness, cooperativeness) were reported as having a more positive effect on participants’ liking of a person than were positive traits associated with non-conformist behaviour (e.g., independence, originality). Furthermore, in determining their liking for a conformist, participants reported placing more importance on the conformist’s possessing the positive traits associated with conforming than on their possessing the negative traits associated with conforming (e.g., dependence, passivity). In spite of their lack of independence, therefore, conformists in Study 2 were liked because participants placed more value on the virtuous aspects of conformity (e.g., agreeableness, cooperativeness). Implications for our culture’s ambivalent attitudes toward both conformity and independence are discussed.
8

A game theoretic approach to understanding ethical conformity in marketing

Martin, Kelly Duggan, January 2007 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Washington State University, May 2007. / Includes bibliographical references.
9

The effect of a barbituate on conforming behavior

Gammer, Carole Ellen, January 1966 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1966. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
10

Conformity, anticonformity and independence

Newtson, Darren Lee, January 1968 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1968. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.

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