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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A study of three aspects of counseling procedures

Hill, Gilbert Kastner, January 1954 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1954. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliography.
2

Adolescent readiness for change and working alliance / Readiness for change and alliance

Irannejad, Shahrzad January 2003 (has links)
The present study examined the predictive ability of the stage model in the establishment of an alliance in adolescent counselling. The relationship between readiness for change and the three dimensions of the working alliance was also further explored. Fifty-one students between the ages of 14 and 18, who were seeking counselling in their schools, were recruited through two school boards in a large eastern Canadian city. The results provided empirical support for a relationship between adolescents' readiness for change and the quality of their working alliance. In comparison to students who were resistant to change, those who were ready to actively change were more likely to develop positive alliances with their counsellors, and were in more agreement with their counsellors on the goals and tasks of counselling. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings for counsellors and other researchers, limitations of this study, and future research directions are discussed.
3

The influence of selected factors on the social orientation of identified adolescent delinquents toward counselors

Tomblin, James Gray, January 1977 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Florida, 1977. / Description based on print version record. Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 164-170).
4

A Process evaluation of counsellor verbal performance within a leisure counselling program.

Oliver, Tessie L. (Tessie Lea), Carleton University. Dissertation. Psychology. January 1992 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Carleton University, 1992. / Also available in electronic format on the Internet.
5

Adolescent readiness for change and working alliance

Irannejad, Shahrzad January 2003 (has links)
No description available.
6

Roles played by counselors in their interviews /

Danskin, David G. January 1954 (has links)
No description available.
7

Attitude Similarity, Expertness and Perceived Counselor Trustworthiness

McKay, Sharon Lee 01 January 1986 (has links) (PDF)
This analogue study investigated the relationship between the "therapeugenic" (Bloom & Trautt, 1978) factors of attitude similarity and expertness on perceived trustworthiness of a confederate counselor. Several investigators have demonstrated that attitude similarity is positively related to perceived attractiveness, likeability and competence of counselors (Good, 1975; Griffitt & Byrne, 1970; Trautt, Finer & Calisher, 1980). There has been mixed support, however, for the notion that counselors who are perceived as "expert" will positively impact the counseling relationship (Brischetto & Merluzzi, 1981; Kunin & Rodin, 1982; Strong & Schmidt, 1970). The present study expanded previous research by jointly manipulating attitude similarity and perceived expertness to allow for assessment of both independent and interactive effects. Fifty-one undergraduate students participated. Attitude similarity between "client" and "counselor" was manipulated by prescreening subjects with an attitude survey consisting of controversial topics (abortion, military spending, capital punishment, etc.). Subjects who scored in the extreme conservative or liberal range of the survey were randomly matched with a confederate counselor whose introductory biographical sketch depicted him or her as attitudinally similar or dissimilar to the subject as well as either relatively experienced/expert or inexperienced/nonexpert in the field. The Counselor Rating Form (CRF) (Lacrosse & Barak, 1976) was utilized to measure the subjects' perceptions of counselor trustworthiness. The mini-intake interview consisted of a 10-minute meeting between confederate counselor and subject. A set of questions were formulated to approximate topic areas covered in a clinical intake interview. Each subject was interviewed by a same-sex confederate counselor. Following informed consent procedures, subjects were read a brief biographical sketch of the counselor who would be interviewing them. This sketch contained aspects of education and experience as well as community/research activities and interests conveying both the degree of "expertness" and "attitude similarity". Immediately following the simulated interview, subjects completed the CRF. Prior to the data collection, a three-part pilot study assessed reliability and validity of the attitude survey instrument and of the interview procedures. Test-retest reliability of the attitude survey yielded an r=.94. Questions from the "mini-intake" interview were rated for level of personal intrusiveness to insure that all subjects would be asked the same proportion of personal questions during the 10-minute interview. Finally, the four biographical sketches were rated- on the expert/nonexpert, conservative/liberal attitude dimensions to check their validity as stimulus materials. A three-way ANOVA was performed with liberal/conservative, attitude similarity, and expertness as the independent factors and perceived trustworthiness as the dependent measure. No significant main effects were obtained. Similarly, the three-way interaction was not significant. A significant two-way interaction effect was demonstrated, however, between Liberalism/Conservatism and Expertness/Nonexpertness. Specifically, conservative subjects rated the nonexpert counselors significantly higher on trustworthiness than did the liberal subjects, while liberal and conservative subjects did not differ in trustworthiness ratings of expert counselors. Results were interpreted in terms of the conservative concept of individuality and nonintervention (Monaghan, 1984). Possible implications for the counseling setting were discussed.
8

Dress Style, Counselor and Client Gender and Expectations About Counseling

Kimsey, Lisa P. (Lisa Pierce) 08 1900 (has links)
This study explored the effects of counselor dress style and counselor and subject gender on clients' expectations about counseling. Two hundred fifty undergraduate students were given Tinsley's Expectations About Counseling questionnaire. Dress style was shown to have no effect on the expectations measured. Significant main effects were found for client gender, counselor gender and their two way interaction on the measures of responsibility, acceptance, confrontation, empathy, genuineness, tolerance, trustworthiness, concreteness, and immediacy. Post hoc analysis revealed that both male and female participants had higher expectations of female counselors than male counselors. Participants of both genders also expected female counselors to be more confrontive, genuine, trustworthy, concrete, and accepting than male counselors. They also had a higher expectation that counseling would address their immediate concerns.
9

COUNSELOR POSITIVE MENTAL HEALTH AS A FACTOR IN GROUP PARTICIPANTS' GROWTH

Wirth, Marion Gene, 1932- January 1973 (has links)
No description available.
10

CLIENT-PERCEIVED THERAPIST EMPATHY AS A CORRELATE OF OUTCOME

Kalfas, Nicholas Soterios, 1945- January 1973 (has links)
No description available.

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