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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Phylogeny and population genetics of acorn barnacles in family Chthamalidae (Crustacea: Cirripedia).

January 2011 (has links)
Wu, Tsz Huen. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2011. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 89-106). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / Chapter Chapter 1 --- General Introduction to thesis --- p.1 / Chapter Chapter 2 --- Literature review --- p.3 / Chapter 2.1 --- Introduction --- p.3 / Chapter 2.1.1 --- General introduction to barnacles --- p.3 / Chapter 2.1.2 --- Classification of barnacles --- p.4 / Chapter 2.1.3 --- Importance of barnacles --- p.4 / Chapter 2.2 --- Molecular phylogenetics of barnacles --- p.6 / Chapter 2.2.1 --- What is phylogenetics --- p.6 / Chapter 2.2.2 --- Phylogenetic studies on barnacles --- p.7 / Chapter 2.2.3 --- Choices on characters for barnacle phylogenetics: Morphological characters vs. molecular characters --- p.11 / Chapter 2.2.4 --- Choices of molecular markers in phylogenetic and population genetic studies on barnacles --- p.14 / Chapter 2.3 --- The use of barnacles as model organism in population genetic studies --- p.21 / Chapter 2.3.1 --- Pleistocene glaciations --- p.22 / Chapter 2.3.2 --- Oceanographic pattern and habitat availability --- p.23 / Chapter Chapter 3 --- Phylogenetic relationship of barnacles in family Chthamalidae --- p.26 / Chapter 3.1 --- Introduction --- p.26 / Chapter 3.2 --- Materials and methods --- p.31 / Chapter 3.2.1 --- "Sample collection, DNA extraction and amplification" --- p.31 / Chapter 3.2.2 --- Phylogenetic analyses --- p.34 / Chapter 3.3 --- Results --- p.35 / Chapter 3.4 --- Discussion --- p.40 / Chapter 3.4.1 --- Subfamily Notochthamalinae --- p.40 / Chapter 3.4.2 --- Subfamily Chthamalinae --- p.42 / Chapter 3.4.3 --- Subfamily Euraphiinae --- p.42 / Chapter 3.4.4 --- Phylogenetic relationship in the family Chthamalidae --- p.43 / Chapter 3.4.5 --- Suggestions on taxonomy of Chthamalidae --- p.45 / Chapter Chapter 4 --- Cryptic Diversity and Genetic Structure of the Acorn Barnacle Chthamalus moro in the Northwest Pacific --- p.47 / Chapter 4.1 --- Introduction --- p.47 / Chapter 4.2 --- Materials and methods --- p.53 / Chapter 4.2.1 --- "Sample collection, DNA extraction and amplification" --- p.53 / Chapter 4.2.2 --- Phylogenetic analysis --- p.55 / Chapter 4.2.3 --- Population genetic analysis --- p.55 / Chapter 4.3 --- Results --- p.57 / Chapter 4.3.1 --- Phylogenetic analysis --- p.57 / Chapter 4.3.2 --- "Population genetics analyses, demographic history and neutrality" --- p.61 / Chapter 4.4 --- Discussion --- p.72 / Chapter 4.4.1 --- Origin and the systematic status of the three lineages --- p.72 / Chapter 4.2.2 --- Demographic history of the three lineages --- p.81 / Chapter 4.3.3 --- Contemporary distribution and genetic connectivity of the three lineages --- p.84 / Chapter Chapter 5 --- Concluding remarks --- p.87 / References --- p.89
2

Phylogeny of decapoda (arthropoda: crustacea) using nuclear protein-coding genes. / CUHK electronic theses & dissertations collection

January 2010 (has links)
Finally, the gene tree of the true crabs, Brachyura, confirms that the basal "Podotremata" is paraphyletic, with the Raninoidea and Cyclodorippoidea more closely related to Eubrachyura than to the other podotremes. Within the monophyletic Eubrachyura, the analysis supports the reciprical monophyly of the two subsections, Heterotremata and Thoracotremata. All of the Old World freshwater crabs cluster together, representing an early diverged lineage in the Heterotremata. / From the inferred phylogeny, we have obtained new insights on the evolution of decapods. First, the spiny lobster from the family Palinuridae is found to be paraphyletic with the polyphyletic Synaxidae nested within it. The Stridentes forms a monophyletic assemblage, indicating that the stridulating sound producing organ evolved only once in the spiny lobsters. Moreover, the spiny lobsters originated in the shallower water rocky reefs of the Southern Hemisphere and then invaded deep sea habitats and diversified. / In sum, I demonstrate the utility of the nuclear protein-coding gene markers in decapod phylogeny and they are informative across a wide range of taxonomic levels. I propose that nuclear protein-coding genes should constitute core markers for future phylogenetic studies of decapods, especially for higher systematics. / Second, we show that hermit crabs have a single origin, but surprisingly, that almost all other major clades and body forms within the Anomura, are derived from within the hermit crabs. The crab-like form and squat lobster form have each evolved at least twice from separate symmetrical hermit crab ancestors. These remarkable cases of multiple parallelism suggest considerable phenotypic flexibility within the hermit crab ground plan, with a general tendency towards carcinization. Rather than having a separate origin from other major clades, hermit crabs have given rise to most other major anomuran body types. / The high diversity of decapods has attracted the interest of carcinologists but there is no consensus on decapod phylogeny in spite of the endeavors using both morphological and molecular approaches. New sources of information are necessary to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships among decapods. In the present study, I attempted to develop and apply the nuclear protein-coding gene markers on decapod phylogeny. Using only two protein-coding genes, we have successfully resolved most of the infraordinal relationships with good statistical support, indicating the superior efficiency of these markers compared to nuclear ribosomal RNA and mitochondrial genes commonly used in phylogenetic reconstruction of decapods. Apparently these two types of markers suffer from the problems of alignment ambiguities and rapid saturation, respectively. Subsequently, I tried to apply the nuclear protein-coding genes in revealing interfamilial and intergeneric evolutionary history in three selected decapod groups, the spiny lobster (family Palinuridae), the infraorder Anomura and the true crabs of the infraorder Brachyura to further evaluate the utility of these markers and reconstruct the evolutionary history the groups. Trees with robust support can be obtained using sequences of three to five genes for the infraorders and families tested including the most speciose Brachyura. The genes are shown to be informative in elucidating interspecific phylogeny as well. / Tsang, Ling Ming. / Adviser: Ka Hou Chu. / Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 73-02, Section: B, page: . / Thesis (Ph.D.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2010. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 127-153). / Electronic reproduction. Hong Kong : Chinese University of Hong Kong, [2012] System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader. Available via World Wide Web. / Electronic reproduction. [Ann Arbor, MI] : ProQuest Information and Learning, [201-] System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader. Available via World Wide Web. / Abstract also in Chinese.
3

Phylogeny of the infraorder Caridea (Crustacea:Decapoda) based on nuclear genes. / 使用細胞核基因之真蝦下目(甲殼亞門 : 十足目)物種分類 / Shi yong xi bao he ji yin zhi zhen xia xia mu (jia qiao ya men:shi zu mu) wu zhong fen lei

January 2010 (has links)
Li, Chi Pang. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2010. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 127-141). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / Abstract --- p.i / Abstract (Chinese) --- p.iii / Acknowledgements --- p.v / Contents --- p.vi / List of Tables --- p.ix / List of Figures --- p.x / Chapter Chapter 1 --- General Introduction --- p.1 / Chapter Chapter 2 --- Literature Review --- p.3 / Chapter 2.1 --- Caridean phylogeny --- p.3 / Chapter 2.1.1 --- Informative morphological characters in Caridean shrimps --- p.3 / Chapter 2.1.2 --- Brief history of Caridean classifications --- p.4 / Chapter 2.1.3 --- Natantia/Reptantia scheme vs. Dendrobranchiata/Pleocyemata scheme --- p.8 / Chapter 2.2 --- Phylogney of the family Hippolytidae --- p.10 / Chapter 2.3 --- Molecular approach to phylogeny --- p.11 / Chapter 2.3.1 --- Use of molecular data --- p.11 / Chapter 2.3.2 --- Use of mitochondrial gene markers in crustaceans --- p.12 / Chapter 2.3.3 --- Use of nuclear gene markers in crustaceans --- p.14 / Chapter Chapter 3 --- Phylogeny of the Infraorder Caridea Based on five Nuclear Genes --- p.27 / Chapter 3.1 --- Introduction --- p.27 / Chapter 3.2 --- Materials and Methods --- p.28 / Chapter 3.2.1 --- Sample Collection --- p.28 / Chapter 3.2.2 --- DNA extraction and PCR amplification --- p.28 / Chapter 3.2.3 --- DNA sequencing --- p.29 / Chapter 3.2.4 --- Phylogenetic analysis --- p.30 / Chapter 3.3 --- Results --- p.34 / Chapter 3.3.1 --- Enolase --- p.34 / Chapter 3.3.2 --- NaK --- p.35 / Chapter 3.3.3 --- PEPCK --- p.37 / Chapter 3.3.4 --- Histone --- p.38 / Chapter 3.3.5 --- 18S rRNA --- p.39 / Chapter 3.3.6 --- Combined dataset --- p.41 / Chapter 3.3.7 --- Substitution saturation analysis --- p.43 / Chapter 3.4 --- Discussion --- p.44 / Chapter 3.4.1 --- Evaluation of the five nuclear gene markers --- p.44 / Chapter 3.4.1.1 --- Nuclear protein coding genes --- p.44 / Chapter 3.4.1.2 --- 18S rRNA --- p.81 / Chapter 3.4.2 --- Superfamilies and families --- p.82 / Chapter 3.4.2.1 --- Superfamilies --- p.82 / Chapter 3.4.2.2 --- Families --- p.86 / Chapter 3.4.3 --- Basal groups --- p.86 / Chapter 3.4.4 --- Procarididae --- p.88 / Chapter Chapter 4 --- Phylogeny of the family Hippolytidae --- p.90 / Chapter 4.1 --- Introduction --- p.90 / Chapter 4.2 --- Materials and Methods --- p.91 / Chapter 4.2.1 --- Sample Collection --- p.91 / Chapter 4.2.2 --- DNA extraction and PCR amplification --- p.91 / Chapter 4.2.3 --- DNA sequencing --- p.95 / Chapter 4.2.4 --- Phylogenetic analysis --- p.95 / Chapter 4.3 --- Results --- p.95 / Chapter 4.3.1 --- Enolase --- p.95 / Chapter 4.3.2 --- NaK --- p.98 / Chapter 4.3.3 --- 16S rRNA --- p.99 / Chapter 4.3.4 --- Combined dataset --- p.100 / Chapter 4.4 --- Discussion --- p.118 / Chapter 4.4.1 --- "Resurrection of family Lysmatidae Dana,1852" --- p.118 / Chapter 4.4.2 --- Other hippolytid clades --- p.120 / Chapter 4.4.2.1 --- """Hippolytidae""" --- p.120 / Chapter 4.4.2.2 --- Bythocarididae --- p.121 / Chapter 4.4.3 --- Superfamily Alpheoidea --- p.122 / Chapter Chapter 5 --- General Conclusion --- p.125 / References --- p.127
4

Transgenic expression of molt-inhibiting hormone from white shrimp (penaeus vannamei) in tobacco.

January 2001 (has links)
by Fong Man Kim. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2001. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 127-137). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / Thesis committee --- p.i / Acknowledgements --- p.ii / Abstract --- p.iii / List of figures --- p.viii / List of tables --- p.xi / Abbreviations --- p.xii / Table of contents --- p.xiv / Chapter CHAPTER 1 --- GENERAL INTRODUCTION --- p.1 / Chapter CHAPTER 2 --- LITERATURE REVIEW --- p.3 / Chapter 2.1 --- MIH from Penaeus vannamei --- p.3 / Chapter 2.1.1 --- General Introduction to P. vannamei --- p.3 / Chapter 2.1.1.1 --- Morphology --- p.3 / Chapter 2.1.1.2 --- Geographical distribution --- p.5 / Chapter 2.1.1.3 --- Economic value --- p.5 / Chapter 2.1.2 --- Physiology of Molting in Crustacean --- p.7 / Chapter 2.1.2.1 --- The molt cycle --- p.7 / Chapter 2.1.2.2 --- Physiological effects of ecdysone --- p.8 / Chapter 2.1.2.3 --- Regulation of the secretion of ecdysone --- p.9 / Chapter 2.1.2.4 --- Physiological effects of Molt-inhibiting hormone --- p.10 / Chapter 2.1.3 --- Cloning of MIH cDNA from P. vannamei --- p.14 / Chapter 2.1.3.1 --- Molecular identity of MIH --- p.14 / Chapter 2.1.3.2 --- Cloning of MIH cDNA --- p.15 / Chapter 2.1.3.3 --- Comparison of the cloned MIH-like cDNA with the CHH/MIH/VIH peptide family --- p.16 / Chapter 2.2 --- Plants as Bioreactors --- p.20 / Chapter 2.2.1 --- Principles & Techniques --- p.20 / Chapter 2.2.2 --- Advantages of plant bioreactors --- p.21 / Chapter 2.2.3 --- Tobacco expression system --- p.22 / Chapter 2.2.3.1 --- Tobacco as model plants --- p.22 / Chapter 2.2.3.2 --- Transformation methods --- p.23 / Chapter 2.2.4 --- Phaseolin --- p.26 / Chapter CHAPTER 3 --- EXPRESSION OF MIH IN TRANSGENIC TOBACCO --- p.28 / Chapter 3.1 --- Introduction --- p.28 / Chapter 3.2 --- Materials & Methods --- p.29 / Chapter 3.2.1 --- Chemicals --- p.29 / Chapter 3.2.2 --- Plant materials --- p.29 / Chapter 3.2.3 --- Bacterial strains and plasmid vectors --- p.30 / Chapter 3.2.4 --- Construction of chimeric genes - --- p.30 / Chapter 3.2.4.1 --- PCR amplification of MIH --- p.30 / Chapter 3.2.4.2 --- Cloning of PCR-amplified MIH into vector pET --- p.31 / Chapter 3.2.4.3 --- Cloning of MIH into vector pBK/Phas-sp and pTZ/Phas --- p.31 / Chapter 3.2.4.4 --- Cloning of MIH into binary vector pBI121 --- p.32 / Chapter 3.2.5 --- Transformation of Agrobacterium with pBI121/Phas-sp-MIH and pBI121 /Phas-MIH by electroporation --- p.39 / Chapter 3.2.6 --- Transformation of tobacco --- p.40 / Chapter 3.2.7 --- Selection of transgenic plants --- p.41 / Chapter 3.2.8 --- GUS assay --- p.42 / Chapter 3.2.9 --- Extraction of leaf genomic DNA --- p.43 / Chapter 3.2.10 --- Extraction of total RNA from developing seeds --- p.44 / Chapter 3.2.11 --- Synthesis of DIG-labeled DNA and RNA probes --- p.45 / Chapter 3.2.12 --- Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA --- p.47 / Chapter 3.2.13 --- Reverse transcriptase - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) --- p.47 / Chapter 3.2.14 --- Northern blot analysis of total RNA --- p.48 / Chapter 3.2.15 --- Protein extraction and tricine-SDS-PAGE --- p.49 / Chapter 3.2.16 --- Purification of 6xHis-tag proteins --- p.50 / Chapter 3.2.17 --- Western blot analysis --- p.50 / Chapter 3.2.18 --- In vitro transcription & translation --- p.52 / Chapter 3.2.18.1 --- Construction of transcription vector containing the chimeric MIH gene --- p.52 / Chapter 3.2.18.2 --- In vitro transcription --- p.56 / Chapter 3.2.18.3 --- In vitro translation --- p.56 / Chapter 3.2.19 --- Particle bombardment --- p.57 / Chapter 3.2.19.1 --- Construction of MIH-GUSN fusion chimeric genes --- p.57 / Chapter 3.2.19.2 --- Conditions of particle bombardment --- p.63 / Chapter 3.2.20 --- Codon modification of MIH gene --- p.63 / Chapter 3.3 --- Results --- p.73 / Chapter 3.3.1 --- Construction of chimeric MIH genes --- p.73 / Chapter 3.3.2 --- "Tobacco transformation, selection and regeneration" --- p.73 / Chapter 3.3.3 --- Detection of GUS activity --- p.74 / Chapter 3.3.4 --- Southern blot analysis --- p.79 / Chapter 3.3.5 --- Detection of MIH transcript in transgenic tobacco --- p.83 / Chapter 3.3.5.1 --- RT-PCR --- p.83 / Chapter 3.3.5.2 --- Northern blot analysis --- p.86 / Chapter 3.3.6 --- Detection of MIH protein by Tricine-SDS-PAGE --- p.86 / Chapter 3.3.7 --- Detection of MIH protein by western blot analysis --- p.88 / Chapter 3.3.7.1 --- Western blot analysis using Anti-MIH antibody --- p.88 / Chapter 3.3.7.2 --- Western blot analysis using Anti-His antibody --- p.90 / Chapter 3.3.7.3 --- Western blot analysis using Anti-MIHA & Anti-MIHB antibodies --- p.90 / Chapter 3.3.8 --- Purification of 6xHis-tag proteins by Ni-NTA column --- p.94 / Chapter 3.3.8.1 --- Western blot analysis of proteins purified by Ni-NTA column --- p.97 / Chapter 3.3.9 --- In vitro transcription and translation --- p.100 / Chapter 3.3.9.1 --- In vitro transcription --- p.100 / Chapter 3.3.9.2 --- In vitro translation --- p.100 / Chapter 3.3.10 --- Particle bombardments --- p.103 / Chapter 3.3.10.1 --- Transient expression of MIH in soybean & tobacco leaves --- p.103 / Chapter CHAPTER 4 --- DISCUSSION --- p.107 / Chapter 4.1 --- Transient expression of MIH genes --- p.109 / Chapter 4.1.1 --- In vitro transcription and translation --- p.109 / Chapter 4.1.2 --- Particle bombardments --- p.220 / Chapter 4.2 --- Post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) --- p.114 / Chapter 4.2.1 --- Post-transcriptional cis-inactivation --- p.114 / Chapter 4.2.2 --- Post-transcriptional trans-inactivation --- p.116 / Chapter 4.2.3 --- MIH gene and PTGS --- p.118 / Chapter 4.3 --- Codon usage --- p.119 / Chapter 4.3.1 --- Codon usage of MIH in plants --- p.120 / Chapter 4.3.2 --- Codon modification of MIH and further study on MIH expression in plants --- p.122 / Chapter 4.4 --- Post-translational protein degradation --- p.123 / Chapter 4.4.1 --- Construction of LRP-MIH fusion proteins --- p.123 / CONCLUSION --- p.125 / REFERENCES --- p.127
5

DNA strand breaks in crustaceans as an indicator of marine pollution.

January 2005 (has links)
Chan Kwan-ling. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2005. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 91-105). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / Abstract --- p.i / Acknowledgements --- p.v / Contents --- p.vi / List of figures and tables --- p.ix / Chapter Chapter 1 --- Introduction / Chapter 1.1 --- Literature review --- p.1 / Chapter 1.1.1 --- The effect of pollutants on the genetic materials of aquatic organisms --- p.1 / Chapter 1.1.1.1 --- Response of individual to genotoxicants --- p.1 / Chapter 1.1.1.2 --- Effects of genotoxicants on population structure --- p.3 / Chapter 1.1.2 --- Application of genetic markers in monitoring water pollution --- p.3 / Chapter 1.1.2.1 --- DNA adduct --- p.4 / Chapter 1.1.2.2 --- Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) test --- p.5 / Chapter 1.1.2.3 --- Micronucleus --- p.6 / Chapter 1.1.2.4 --- DNA strand breaks --- p.7 / Chapter 1.1.3 --- Single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay --- p.9 / Chapter 1.1.4 --- Test organisms for comet assay --- p.12 / Chapter 1.2 --- Objective of the present study --- p.13 / Chapter Chapter 2 --- Genotoxicity of pollutants on Hyale crassicornis / Chapter 2.1 --- Introduction --- p.22 / Chapter 2.2 --- Materials and methods --- p.24 / Chapter 2.2.1 --- Sampling of amphipods --- p.24 / Chapter 2.2.2 --- Acclimation --- p.24 / Chapter 2.2.3 --- Acute toxicity test --- p.26 / Chapter 2.2.4 --- The effect of test duration on DNA damage --- p.27 / Chapter 2.2.5 --- Effect of toxicants on DNA damage --- p.28 / Chapter 2.2.6 --- Comet assay --- p.29 / Chapter 2.2.7 --- Chemicals --- p.34 / Chapter 2.2.8 --- Data analysis --- p.34 / Chapter 2.3 --- Results --- p.34 / Chapter 2.4 --- Discussion --- p.47 / Chapter Chapter 3 --- Genotoxicity of hydrogen peroxide on different tissue types of Metapenaeus ensis / Chapter 3.1 --- Introduction --- p.54 / Chapter 3.2 --- Materials and Methods --- p.57 / Chapter 3.2.1 --- Collection and acclimation of shrimps --- p.57 / Chapter 3.2.2 --- Incubation --- p.59 / Chapter 3.2.3 --- Comet Assay --- p.60 / Chapter 3.2.4 --- Chemicals --- p.61 / Chapter 3.2.5 --- Data analysis --- p.61 / Chapter 3.3 --- Results --- p.61 / Chapter 3.4 --- Discussion --- p.67 / Chapter Chapter 4 --- Genotoxicity of wastewater on Hyale crassicornis / Chapter 4.1 --- Introduction --- p.71 / Chapter 4.2 --- Materials and Methods --- p.72 / Chapter 4.2.1 --- Collection of wastewater samples --- p.72 / Chapter 4.2.2 --- Metal content analysis --- p.73 / Chapter 4.2.3 --- Genotoxic effect of wastewater samples on Hyale crassicornis --- p.74 / Chapter 4.2.4 --- Chemicals --- p.76 / Chapter 4.2.5 --- Statistical analysis --- p.77 / Chapter 4.3 --- Results --- p.77 / Chapter 4.3.1 --- Metals content in water samples --- p.77 / Chapter 4.3.2 --- DNA damage --- p.79 / Chapter 4.4 --- Discussion --- p.79 / Chapter Chapter 5 --- Conclusions --- p.89 / References --- p.91

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