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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Mass modelling in X-/#gamma#-ray astronomy

Ferguson, Colin January 2000 (has links)
No description available.
2

Digital Inverter With Speed Estimation and Dead Time Compensation

LEE, YU-HO 10 July 2002 (has links)
The thesis will be established as digital Inverter with analog power board and DSP kernel. We can accomplish effective ac motor control with VVVF mode by powerful arithmetic ability of DSP. Furthermore, we can obtain rotor speed by calculating the feedback voltage and current of motor from sensors. We adopt the new integrator scheme to replace traditional pure integrator to solve the dc drift and initial value problems. Meanwhile, we can compensate the voltage distortion caused by dead time to decrease current ripple via judging the direction of current. Because we have modulized our circuits, it is very convenient that we can achieve modern control theories by software modification only.
3

Simulation of a Current Controller with Dead-Time Compensation

Heide, Johanna, Granström, Mattias January 2021 (has links)
This master's thesis is divided into two parts. The first part concerns the development of a simulation model of a current controller and a physical drive unit, both implemented in Simulink with the use of legacy code and regulated with field oriented control. The second part concerns the development of a dead-time compensation algorithm. The dead-time is a small delay added to the pulse width modulation signal to diminish the risk of a short circuit in the power electronics. The dead-time causes a voltage distortion, resulting in distorted phase currents, a lower bandwidth and ultimately a decreased machine accuracy. The new simulation environment was able to simulate a real life scenario with promising results. Hence, it could be used to evaluate the dead-time compensation algorithms. Three different dead-time compensation algorithms were implemented and they all showed an increased smoothness of the phase currents as well as an increased controller bandwidth. Both these features are desirable outcomes and all three algorithms show potential to improve accuracy when implemented in a real system.
4

Condition Monitoring of Control Loops

Horch, Alexander January 2000 (has links)
The main concern of this work is the development of methodsfor automatic condition monitoring of control loops withapplication to the process industry. By condition monitoringboth detection and diagnosis of malfunctioning control loops isunderstood, using normal operating data and a minimum amount ofprocess knowledge. The use of indices for quantifying loop performance is dealtwith in the first part of the thesis. The starting point is anindex proposed by Harris (1989). This index has been modifiedin order to cover a larger range of processes. The same conceptis then used to assess the sampling rate in control loops.Other index-based monitoring methods where some amount ofprocess knowledge is available are discussed. The evaluation of the performance indices discussed requiresknowledge of the process dead-time. Therefore a concept calledevent-triggered estimation is introduced in the second part ofthe thesis. Both automatic data selection and dead-timeestimation methods are proposed and conditions for successfulestimation are discussed. The last part of the thesis deals with the diagnosis ofoscillations. A method to automatically diagnose staticfriction (stiction) in the actuator is presented. Furthermore,two methods are proposed which allow automatic distinction ofexternally and internally generated oscillations. All describedmethods have been implemented in a MATLAB-based graphical userinterface which is briefly described.
5

A PC-based data acquisition system for sub-atomic physics measurements

Chabot, Daron 23 July 2008
Modern particle physics measurements are heavily dependent upon automated data acquisition systems (DAQ) to collect and process experiment-generated information. One research group from the University of Saskatchewan utilizes a DAQ known as the Lucid data acquisition and analysis system. This thesis examines the project undertaken to upgrade the hardware and software components of Lucid. To establish the effectiveness of the system upgrades, several performance metrics were obtained including the system's dead time and input/output bandwidth.<p>Hardware upgrades to Lucid consisted of replacing its aging digitization equipment with modern, faster-converting Versa-Module Eurobus (VME) technology and replacing the instrumentation processing platform with common, PC hardware. The new processor platform is coupled to the instrumentation modules via a fiber-optic bridging-device, the sis1100/3100 from Struck Innovative Systems.<p>The software systems of Lucid were also modified to follow suit with the new hardware. Originally constructed to utilize a proprietary real-time operating system, the data acquisition application was ported to run under the freely available Real-Time Executive for Multiprocessor Systems (RTEMS). The device driver software provided with sis1100/3100 interface also had to be ported for use under the RTEMS-based system. <p>Performance measurements of the upgraded DAQ indicate that the dead time has been reduced from being on the order of milliseconds to being on the order of several tens of microseconds. This increased capability means that Lucid's users may acquire significantly more data in a shorter period of time, thereby decreasing both the statistical uncertainties and data collection duration associated with a given experiment.
6

A PC-based data acquisition system for sub-atomic physics measurements

Chabot, Daron 23 July 2008 (has links)
Modern particle physics measurements are heavily dependent upon automated data acquisition systems (DAQ) to collect and process experiment-generated information. One research group from the University of Saskatchewan utilizes a DAQ known as the Lucid data acquisition and analysis system. This thesis examines the project undertaken to upgrade the hardware and software components of Lucid. To establish the effectiveness of the system upgrades, several performance metrics were obtained including the system's dead time and input/output bandwidth.<p>Hardware upgrades to Lucid consisted of replacing its aging digitization equipment with modern, faster-converting Versa-Module Eurobus (VME) technology and replacing the instrumentation processing platform with common, PC hardware. The new processor platform is coupled to the instrumentation modules via a fiber-optic bridging-device, the sis1100/3100 from Struck Innovative Systems.<p>The software systems of Lucid were also modified to follow suit with the new hardware. Originally constructed to utilize a proprietary real-time operating system, the data acquisition application was ported to run under the freely available Real-Time Executive for Multiprocessor Systems (RTEMS). The device driver software provided with sis1100/3100 interface also had to be ported for use under the RTEMS-based system. <p>Performance measurements of the upgraded DAQ indicate that the dead time has been reduced from being on the order of milliseconds to being on the order of several tens of microseconds. This increased capability means that Lucid's users may acquire significantly more data in a shorter period of time, thereby decreasing both the statistical uncertainties and data collection duration associated with a given experiment.
7

Condition Monitoring of Control Loops

Horch, Alexander January 2000 (has links)
<p>The main concern of this work is the development of methodsfor automatic condition monitoring of control loops withapplication to the process industry. By condition monitoringboth detection and diagnosis of malfunctioning control loops isunderstood, using normal operating data and a minimum amount ofprocess knowledge.</p><p>The use of indices for quantifying loop performance is dealtwith in the first part of the thesis. The starting point is anindex proposed by Harris (1989). This index has been modifiedin order to cover a larger range of processes. The same conceptis then used to assess the sampling rate in control loops.Other index-based monitoring methods where some amount ofprocess knowledge is available are discussed.</p><p>The evaluation of the performance indices discussed requiresknowledge of the process dead-time. Therefore a concept calledevent-triggered estimation is introduced in the second part ofthe thesis. Both automatic data selection and dead-timeestimation methods are proposed and conditions for successfulestimation are discussed.</p><p>The last part of the thesis deals with the diagnosis ofoscillations. A method to automatically diagnose staticfriction (stiction) in the actuator is presented. Furthermore,two methods are proposed which allow automatic distinction ofexternally and internally generated oscillations. All describedmethods have been implemented in a MATLAB-based graphical userinterface which is briefly described.</p>
8

Regulatory level model predictive control

Sha'Aban, Yusuf January 2015 (has links)
The need to save energy, cut costs, and increase profit margin in process manufactureincreases continually. There is also a global drive to reduce energy use and cut down co2 emission and combat climate change. These in turn have led to more stringent requirements on process control performance. Hence, the requirements for modern systems are often not achievable using classical control techniques. Therefore, advanced control strategies are often required to ensure optimal process performance. Despite these challenges, PID has continued to be the dominant industrial control scheme. However, for systems with complex dynamics and/or high performance requirements, PID control may not be sufficient. Therefore, a significant number of industrial control loops are not performing optimally and more advanced control than PID may be required in order to achieve optimal performance. MPC is one of the advanced control schemes that has had a significant impact in the industry. Despite the benefits associated with the implementation of MPC, the technology has remained a niche application in process manufacture. This thesis seeks to address these issues by developing ways that could lead to widespread application of MPC. In the first part of this thesis, a study was carried out to understand the characteristics of processes that would benefit from the application of MPC at the regulatory control level even in the single-input single-output (SISO) case. This is a departure from the common practice in which MPC is applied at the supervisory control layer delivering set points to PID controllers at the regulatory control layer. Both numerical simulation and industrial studies were used to show and quantify benefits of MPC for SISO applications at the regulatory control layer. Some issues that have led to the limited application of MPC include the cost and human efforts associated with modelling and controller design. And to achieve high process performance, accurate models are required. To address this issue, in the second part of this thesis, a novel technique for designing MPC from routine plant data – routine data MPC (RMPC) is proposed. The proposed technique was successfully implemented on process models. This technique would reduce the high human cost associated with MPC deployment, which could make it a widespread rather than niche application in the process manufacturing industry.
9

High Efficiency Optimization of LLC Resonant Converter for Wide Load Range

Liu, Ya 13 February 2008 (has links)
As information technology advances, so does the demand for power management of telecom and computing equipment. High efficiency and high power density are still the key technology drivers for power management for these applications. In order to save energy, in 2005, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the first draft of its proposed revision to its ENERGY STAR specification for computers. The draft specification separately addresses efficiency requirements for laptop, desktop, workstation and server computers. The draft specification also proposes a minimum power supply efficiency of 80% for PCs and 75% to 83% for desktop derived servers, depending on loading condition and server type. Furthermore, recently some industry companies came out with a much higher efficiency target for the whole AC/DC front-end converter over a wide load range. Distributed power systems are widely adopted in the telecom and computing applications for the reason of high performance and high reliability. As one of the key building blocks in distributed power systems, DC/DC converters in the front-end converter are also under the pressure of increasing efficiency and power density. Due to the hold-up time requirement, PWM DC/DC converters cannot achieve high efficiency for well known reasons when they are designed for wide input voltage range. As a promising topology for this application, LLC resonant converters can achieve both high efficiency and wide input voltage range capability because of its voltage gain characteristics and small switching loss. However, the efficiency of LLC resonant converter with diode rectifier still cannot meet the recent efficiency target from industry. In order to further improve efficiency of LLC resonant converters, synchronous rectification must be used. The complete solution of synchronous rectification of LLC resonant converters is discussed in this thesis. The driving of the synchronous rectifier can be realized by sensing the voltage Vds of the SR. The turn-on of the SR can be triggered by the body-diode conduction of the SR. With the Vds compensation network, the precise voltage drop on Rds_on can be achieved, thus the SR can be turned off at the right time. Moreover, efficiency optimization at normal operation over wide load range is discussed. It is revealed that power loss at normal operation is solely determined by the magnetizing inductance while the magnetizing inductor is designed according to dead-time td selection. The mathematic equations for the relationship between power loss and dead-time are developed. For the first time, the relationship between power loss and dead-time is used as a tool for efficiency optimization. With this tool, the efficiency optimization of the LLC resonant converter can be made according to efficiency requirement over a wide load range. With the expectation to achieve high efficiency at ultra-light load, the green mode operation of LLC resonant converters is addressed. The rationale of the issue with the conventional control algorithm is revealed and a preliminary solution is proposed. / Master of Science
10

Dead-Time Induced Oscillations in Voltage Source Inverter-Fed Induction Motor Drives

Guha, Anirudh January 2016 (has links) (PDF)
The inverter dead-time is integral to the safety of a voltage source inverter (VSI). Dead-time is introduced between the complementary gating signals of the top and bottom switches in each VSI leg to prevent shoot-through fault. This thesis reports and investigates dead-time induced sub-harmonic oscillations in open-loop induction motor drives of different power levels, under light-load conditions. The thesis develops mathematical models that help understand and predict the oscillatory behaviour of such motor drives due to dead-time act. Models are also developed to study the impact of under-compensation and over-compensation of dead-time act on stability. The various models are validated through extensive simulations and experimental results. The thesis also proposes and validates active damping schemes for mitigation of such sub-harmonic oscillations. The thesis reports high-amplitude sub-harmonic oscillations in the stator current, torque and speed of a 100-kW open-loop induction motor drive in the laboratory, operating under no-load. Experimental studies, carried out on 22-kW, 11-kW, 7.5-kW and 3.7-kW open-loop induction motor drives, establish the prevalence of dead-time induced sub-harmonic oscillations in open-loop motor drives of different power levels. An experimental procedure is established for systematic study of this phenomenon in industrial drives. This procedure yields the operating region, if any, where the motor drive is oscillatory. As a first step towards understanding the oscillatory behaviour of the motor drive, a mathematical model of the VSI is derived in a synchronously revolving reference frame (SRF), incorporating the of dead-time on the inverter output voltage. This leads to a modified dynamic model of the inverter-fed induction motor in the SRF, inclusive of the dead-time act. While the rotor dynamic equations are already non-linear, dead-time is found to introduce nonlinearities in the stator dynamic equations as well. The nonlinearities in the modified dynamic model make even the steady solution non-trivial. Under steady conditions, the dead-time can be modelled as the drop across an equivalent resistance (Req0) in the stator circuit. A precise method to evaluate the equivalent resistance Req0 and a simple method to arrive at the steady solution are proposed and validated. For the purpose of stability analysis, a small-signal model of the drive is then derived by linearizing the non-linear dynamic equations of the motor drive, about a steady-state operating point. The proposed small-signal model shows that dead-time contributes to different values of equivalent resistances along the q-axis and d-axis and also to equivalent cross-coupling reactance’s that appear in series with the stator windings. Stability analysis performed using the proposed model brings out the region of oscillatory behaviour (or region of small-signal instability) of the 100-kW motor drive on the voltage versus frequency (V- f) plane, considering no-load. The oscillatory region predicted by the small-signal analysis is in good agreement with simulations and practical observations for the 100-kW motor drive. The small-signal analysis is also able to predict the region of oscillatory behaviour of an 11-kW motor drive, which is con consumed by simulations and experiments. The analysis also predicts the frequencies of sub-harmonic oscillations at different operating points quite well for both the drives. Having the validity of the small-signal analysis at different power levels, this analytical procedure is used to predict the regions of oscillatory behaviour of 2-pole, 4-pole, 6-pole and 8-pole induction motors rated 55 kW and 110 kW. The impact of dead-time on inverter output voltage has been studied widely in literature. This thesis studies the influence of dead-time on the inverter input current as well. Based on this study, the dynamic model of the inverter fed induction motor is extended to include the dc-link dynamics as well. Simulation results based on this extended model tally well with the experimentally measured dc-link voltage and stator current waveforms in the 100-kW drive. Dead-time compensation may be employed to mitigate the dead-time and oscillatory behaviour of the drive. However, accurate dead-time compensation is challenging to achieve due to various factors such as delays in gate drivers, device switching characteristics, etc. Effects of under-compensation and over-compensation of dead time are investigated in this thesis. Under-compensation is shown to result in the same kind of oscillatory behaviour as observed with dead-time, but the fundamental frequency range over which such oscillations occur is reduced. On the other hand, over-compensation of dead-time effect is shown to result in a different kind of oscillatory behaviour. These two types of oscillatory behaviour due to under- and over-compensation, respectively, are distinguished and demonstrated by analyses, simulations and experiments on the 100-kW drive. To mitigate the oscillatory behaviour of the drive, an active damping scheme is proposed. This scheme emulates the effect of an external inductor in series with the stator winding. A small-signal model is proposed for an induction motor drive with the proposed active damping scheme. Simulations and experiments on the 100-kW drive demonstrate effective mitigation of light-load instability with this active damping scheme. In the above inductance emulation scheme, the emulated inductance is seen by the sub-harmonic components, fundamental component as well as low-order harmonic components of the motor current. Since the emulated inductance is also seen by the fundamental component, there is a fundamental voltage drop across the emulated inductance, leading to reduced co-operation of the induction motor. Hence, an improved active damping scheme is proposed wherein the emulated inductance is seen only by the sub-harmonic and low-order harmonic components. This is achieved through appropriate altering in the synchronously revolving domain. The proposed improved active damping scheme is shown to mitigate the sub-harmonic oscillation effectively without any reduction in flux.

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