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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The merging of Further Education and Training colleges challenging factors in three provinces of South Africa

Bisshoff, TC, Nkoe, MN January 2005 (has links)
The workplace of today is characterized by global competition, cultural diversity, technological and management processes that require people to think critically, solve problems and communicate effectively. This requires a well founded Further Education and Training system. The researchers have indicated that the provision of vocational training under apartheid, that is, prior to 1994, was characterized by unequal access to learning opportunities based on the vestiges of legal, financial and other distinctions between formerly advantaged and disadvantaged institutions (Department of Education 2001, 9). The National Department of Education decided to merge the above institutions in attempt to remove the aforementioned vestiges. Education systems do not, however, just change because there is a change in the government, but the existing structures and vested interests, material constraints and the interplay of competing ideologies do warrant changes in education systems (McGregor and McGregor 1992, 17). At the same time, education transformation goes hand in glove with political transformation as a result of the shift in the balance of political power (African National Congress 1994, 3). However, education is a fundamental process, which can be expected to reflect the values, principles and practices of a new democratic dispensation at all levels and in all sectors (Nkoe 2002, 129). The article purports to investigate the perceptions of stakeholders on the merging of the Further Education and Training (FET) colleges in bringing about transformation of the South African FET sector. The reform of the FET colleges, which resulted in the formation of the new FET institutional landscape, is seen as a means to address and fulfil the aspirations of the democratic society as set in the preambles of the new legislation, namely, the Further Education and Training Act 98 of 1998, the Skills Development Act 97 of 1998, the South African Qualification Authority Act 57 of 1995 and the Employment Equity Act 55 of 1998. In order to achieve this, the legislation will be examined and the perceptions of the FET colleges' stakeholders will be explored to help achieve this objective.
2

An evaluation of the Gauteng Department of Education for evaluating Learning and Teaching Support Materials (LTSM).

Mahlaba, Frans Sipho 09 September 2008 (has links)
Education departments are faced with the challenge to ensure that materials presented to them by various Learning and Teaching Support Materials (LTSM) developers are evaluated for possible approval, selection and inclusion into catalogues. This is in line with the principles of the United Nations Commission for Human Rights as stipulated in article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1998). The process of evaluation is scaled down to regional, national, provincial, district and school level within the South African milieu. It is standard practice for education departments to use an evaluation instrument with specific criteria, train educators as evaluators and asses the effectiveness of the evaluation process. I have been motivated to undertake this research because of my interest in investigating whether the instrument used by Gauteng Department of Education (GDE) to evaluate LTSM, builds capacity among evaluators of materials yield reliable, objective results upon their evaluating the LTSM. Thus this study is concerned with evaluation of the effectiveness, efficiency and impact of the evaluation instrument itself. The three concepts, according to Boulmetics & Dutwin (2000: 5), are collectively termed levels of programme evaluation. The unit of analysis of the study is the Foundation Phase evaluators’ experiences. The topic is examined from the theoretical perspective of Evaluation theory and Metatheory (Scriven, 2003, Stufflebeam, 2003; Stake, 2003), educational evaluation in Africa (Omolewa and Kellaghan, 2003) and social constructivism as the educators are encouraged to work in a collaborative, participative fashion using the instrument. The argument of this inquiry is that discourse, social involvement and collaboration are essential in the evaluators’ engagement with the instrument and enable them to construct their knowledge by utilizing existing and new knowledge. As primary users educators as evaluators are engaged in and formpart of the context, input, process and product evaluation to attain their values (Stufflebeam, 2003). Evaluators are stakeholders and therefore, in this study, fulfil what Stake (2003) refers to as stakeholder evaluation or connoisseurship evaluation. Evaluators also respond to key issues and problems that they experience at the evaluation site in what Stake (2003) refers to as responsive evaluation. A questionnaire-based survey, observations and interviews were conducted to collect data. I will engage with the works of authors on evaluation of systems, materials, programmes and projects at different levels and this implies something further than mere voting and requires the participants to deliberate (House and Howe, 2003). Evaluators of LTSM are given knowledge on evaluation in a social, interactive manner that promotes discourse. Lincoln (2003) refers to the participative evaluators as a community of knowers. To this study, I also contribute my experience as an education specialist and also my early experience as a teacher. Although I worked as a high school teacher, I was appointed to work in GDE District and Head Office as an education specialist. This exposed me to Foundation Phase educators/ practitioners. I made use of that social and dialogic relationship for the benefit of the study. The study concludes with findings illustrating that: educators are willing to perform the function as part of their work; the instrument encourages collaborative evaluation; the instrument is a core element for the evaluation process; and that evaluators need some assistance when evaluating LTSM. Based on the findings, I make recommendations for, among other things, the GDE to be more conscious of the significance of this process and to formalize relevant LTSM structures. / Mr. W.A. Janse van Rensburg
3

A critical analysis of communication channels and systems in the Department of Education, with relevance to districts, circuits and schools of eThekwini

Mngoma, Ntombifuthi Patricia January 2007 (has links)
A dissertation submitted in fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of D. Litt in Communication Science at the University of Zululand, 2007. / The main task of Chief Superintendents of Education Management (CSEMs) and Superintendents of Education Management (SEMs) and principals is to achieve the goals of the Education Department. They direct the activities and performance of their supervisees. In pursuing this, a leadership relationship and interaction between the supervisors and his supervisees is necessary. These leaders however, perform two significant roles; that of leading and that of being led. The leadership of these leaders is influenced /affected by the relationship the leader has with his supervisor to perform optimally or rninimally. For these managers in Education to lead effectively, they need to be well and timeously informed about matters. The SEMs need to be kept abreast of education related issues because of the type of work they do. It ranges from communicating departmental goals and objectives, consultation with stakeholders, chairing workshops and meetings of principals, parents and School Governing Bodies. They also serve on recruitment panels, among many other functions. Various forms of communication styles systems and communication strategies are viewed as significantly crucial in the work of the SEM. The SEM however relies on senior management for information. Latest and revised policies come to the SEM via the line function. Reaching the set destination depends on the leadership styles of the supervisors, whether they are traditional or transformational leaders. The SEM likewise, disseminates the information to the principals of schools. They in turn do the same to their supervisees at school and to School Governing Bodies, where necessary. The leadership styles of the SEMs and principals also affect information dissemination either positively or negatively. The results of the study points out that communication channels are not always adhered to in the Department of Education. Information does not reach the SEMs on time. E-communication is still minimally used in the Department of Education.
4

Stress management and its impact on work performance of educators in public schools in KwaZulu–Natal / Kiveshni Naidoo

Naidoo, Kiveshni January 2011 (has links)
This study focuses on stress management of educators, and specifically in the KwaZulu–Natal geographical region. The study consists of four focus areas (which are presented in article format), namely: * The first article identifies the role–players and their functions in delivering quality education to all South Africans. The article identifies the role–players from literature research and discusses their influences on the South African educational environment. A biographical profile of the educators of the KwaZulu–Natal area is compiled in the article by means of empirical research. * The second article employs both theoretical and empirical research to focus on the causes of stress to educators in public schools. In addition to identifying the causes of stress, the article also determines how stress impacts on the work performance of educators in KwaZulu–Natal. * The third article reports on management and leadership qualities of a school, and how guidance can assist in the transformation process. The study further examines the effects of a principal's leadership behaviour on the school's learning culture in KwaZulu–Natal. * This final article is a comparative study. It provides an overview of similarly focussed studies by Jackson (2004), Jackson and Rothman (2006) and Van Wyk (2006) with regard to the causes of stress among educators (but in different application settings namely the North West and Free State provinces). The focus in the final article is to determine if the stressors and its influences in education are generic throughout South Africa, or localised to KwaZulu–Natal. The research design consisted of selecting four districts randomly from the twelve in KwaZulu–Natal. From these districts, a total of 1 500 participants were randomly selected from the total population of 2 123 educators in the four districts. This amounted to a sample of 70.6% of the population). A total of 358 respondents completed the questionnaires resulting in a response rate of 23.3%. The study employed the statistical software programme SPSS 17.0 for Windows to analyse the data. A number of quantitative statistical techniques befitting the doctoral level of research were used to analyse the data. These techniques are: * Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin (KMO) measure of sampling adequacy; * Bartlett's test of sphericity; * Exploratory factor analysis; * Cronbach Alpha's reliability coefficient; and * Pearson's correlation coefficient. The major findings of the study were that: * Three major role–players are identified in the first article, namely the educators, the Department of Education and the learners. To effectively facilitate quality education, management is a crucial component, whilst these role–players are also influenced by the macro environment. * The second article identified causes of stress. These causes account for a favourable 71.6% of the variance explained, and are: organisational support, overload, remuneration, control, job insecurity, job opportunities and growth opportunities. * The third article identified seven factors of importance in management and leadership. These factors explained a favourable 78.6% variance and are: Management and leadership styles, financial security, management and leadership fairness, stressors, empowerment, job security and sense of control over the work environment. * In the final article it is clear that the stressors are generic to South Africa. The majority of stressors have been identified by studies in the Free State, North West and in this study in KwaZulu–Natal. These stressors are organisational support, overload, growth opportunities / task characteristics, rewards and remuneration, and job insecurity. The ultimate recommendation of the study is because stress impacts negatively on the educators and their performance, a national strategy is partly required to improve educator stress as there are a number of common stressors in the three separate studies. Yet, further research is needed to substantiate the prevalence of these factors in all the provinces. A provincial approach is recommended for province specific stressors, while the national strategy could address the common stressors in conjunction with a provincial stress relieve programme. The study culminates in a final perceptual map of stressors, it causes and educator management that could handsomely assist in the drafting of such a national stress strategy for educators. / Thesis (Ph.D. (Business Management))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2011.
5

Stress management and its impact on work performance of educators in public schools in KwaZulu–Natal / Kiveshni Naidoo

Naidoo, Kiveshni January 2011 (has links)
This study focuses on stress management of educators, and specifically in the KwaZulu–Natal geographical region. The study consists of four focus areas (which are presented in article format), namely: * The first article identifies the role–players and their functions in delivering quality education to all South Africans. The article identifies the role–players from literature research and discusses their influences on the South African educational environment. A biographical profile of the educators of the KwaZulu–Natal area is compiled in the article by means of empirical research. * The second article employs both theoretical and empirical research to focus on the causes of stress to educators in public schools. In addition to identifying the causes of stress, the article also determines how stress impacts on the work performance of educators in KwaZulu–Natal. * The third article reports on management and leadership qualities of a school, and how guidance can assist in the transformation process. The study further examines the effects of a principal's leadership behaviour on the school's learning culture in KwaZulu–Natal. * This final article is a comparative study. It provides an overview of similarly focussed studies by Jackson (2004), Jackson and Rothman (2006) and Van Wyk (2006) with regard to the causes of stress among educators (but in different application settings namely the North West and Free State provinces). The focus in the final article is to determine if the stressors and its influences in education are generic throughout South Africa, or localised to KwaZulu–Natal. The research design consisted of selecting four districts randomly from the twelve in KwaZulu–Natal. From these districts, a total of 1 500 participants were randomly selected from the total population of 2 123 educators in the four districts. This amounted to a sample of 70.6% of the population). A total of 358 respondents completed the questionnaires resulting in a response rate of 23.3%. The study employed the statistical software programme SPSS 17.0 for Windows to analyse the data. A number of quantitative statistical techniques befitting the doctoral level of research were used to analyse the data. These techniques are: * Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin (KMO) measure of sampling adequacy; * Bartlett's test of sphericity; * Exploratory factor analysis; * Cronbach Alpha's reliability coefficient; and * Pearson's correlation coefficient. The major findings of the study were that: * Three major role–players are identified in the first article, namely the educators, the Department of Education and the learners. To effectively facilitate quality education, management is a crucial component, whilst these role–players are also influenced by the macro environment. * The second article identified causes of stress. These causes account for a favourable 71.6% of the variance explained, and are: organisational support, overload, remuneration, control, job insecurity, job opportunities and growth opportunities. * The third article identified seven factors of importance in management and leadership. These factors explained a favourable 78.6% variance and are: Management and leadership styles, financial security, management and leadership fairness, stressors, empowerment, job security and sense of control over the work environment. * In the final article it is clear that the stressors are generic to South Africa. The majority of stressors have been identified by studies in the Free State, North West and in this study in KwaZulu–Natal. These stressors are organisational support, overload, growth opportunities / task characteristics, rewards and remuneration, and job insecurity. The ultimate recommendation of the study is because stress impacts negatively on the educators and their performance, a national strategy is partly required to improve educator stress as there are a number of common stressors in the three separate studies. Yet, further research is needed to substantiate the prevalence of these factors in all the provinces. A provincial approach is recommended for province specific stressors, while the national strategy could address the common stressors in conjunction with a provincial stress relieve programme. The study culminates in a final perceptual map of stressors, it causes and educator management that could handsomely assist in the drafting of such a national stress strategy for educators. / Thesis (Ph.D. (Business Management))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2011.
6

A Survey of the Health Education Program of the State Department of Education of Texas

Enloe, Minnie Fae 08 1900 (has links)
The purpose of this study is to make a survey of the work of the State Department of Education of Texas in promoting school health services in the state. In addition, attention is given to the changing aims of education, the development of school health services throughout the nation, the urgent need for reorientation of subject matter, methods of teaching, and need for greater public financing of health education.
7

A Comparative Study Between Department of Education Assigned-Marks and Accredited High Schools' Assigned-Marks in Alberta

Christensen, Douglas Harold 01 May 1979 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to determine if there had been a significant change in the academic achievement, as measured by Grade XII grade-point averages, of Alberta's matriculation graduates since the accreditation of Alberta high schools in 1973. The experimental population consisted of 100, 1971-72 and of 100, 1976-77 matriculation graduates who had graduated from schools in the rural school jurisdictions in Education zone 6; and of 100, 1971-72, and of 100, 1976-77 matriculation graduates who had graduated from schools in the Medicine Hat urban school jurisdiction. All of the students in the experimental population had completed their freshman year at the Medicine Hat College the year following their graduation from high school. The variables analyzed in this study were: (1) Departmental Examination Grade XII grade-point averages, (2) Teacher-assigned Grade XII grade-point averages, (3) college freshmen grade-point averages, and (4) zones (rural and urban). Correlation coefficients were calculated between Grade XII grade-point averages before and after the accreditation of Alberta high schools. Results indicated that the correlation coefficients ranged from .36 to 50. The Grade XII grade-point averages which showed the highest correlations with college freshmen grade-point averages were those which had been obtained on Departmental Examinations. The Fisher's Zr transformation statistical test indicated, at the .05 level of significance, that there was no significant difference between the zones' correlation coefficients before and after accreditation. The two way analysis of variance test results indicated that there was no significant mean difference between Departmental Examinations Grade XII grade-point averages and teacher-assigned grades. There was, however, a significant difference at the .01 level, between the rural and urban zones' matriculation graduates' Grade XII grade-point averages. The t test showed that there was no significant mean difference between the rural and urban zone's matriculation graduates' Grades XII grade-point averages before accreditation, but after accreditation there was a significant mean difference at the .01 level. The two-way analysis of variance statistical test results showed no significant mean difference in the Medicine Hat College's freshmen grade-point averages prior to or after accreditation.
8

Performance management and developmental system within Department of Education in the North West Province / Basetsana Gloria Mahape

Mahape, Basetsana Gloria January 2005 (has links)
The Minister for Public Service and Administration Geraldine Fraser-Moleketi, made a request to government departments to move towards improved productivity, an improved scale of service delivery and the kind of quality service where citizens can say that public servants across the board, are performing to the best of their ability. The Government has put in place policies such as Performance Management and Developmental System (PMDS) as a gesture of its commitment and seriousness about effecting a better life for all through a business like approach to public service, Unfortunately some governments departments fail to enforce the policy accordingly. This paper is intended to examine the implementation of PMDS within the Department of Education in the North West. A qualitative research was conducted in the Corporate Center (Head Office) of the department. The data was collected from three managers and four staff members, two of whom are union representatives. The correspondence on PMDS and the researcher's observations were also used in this study. The investigation conducted revealed that performance management is not a priority in the department as it is done on an ad ho basis. There are also no specific people appointed to enforce the policy and those supervisors who do not feel like implementing the tool do so. This has a negative impact on the service delivery. There is a need for the department to make performance management a priority so as to improve productivity and service delivery. / M.Admin. (Industrial Relations) North-West University, Mafikeng Campus, 2005
9

Exploring the learning paths of academic department chairs

Massaro, Anne V. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Ohio State University, 2007. / Title from first page of PDF file. Includes bibliographical references (p. 116-125).
10

An analysis of the industrial arts programs in the public secondary schools of Louisiana, 1975-1976

Dunagan, Tommy S. 08 1900 (has links)
The problem of this study was to determine the status of industrial arts programs in the public secondary schools of Louisiana and perceptions of industrial arts teachers in regards to their programs. The study was a cooperative effort of the Industrial Arts Division of the State Department of Education of Louisiana.

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