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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

Assessing the capacity for collaborative ecosystem stewardship on private forestland in the Missouri Ozarks

Wolter, Faren R., January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2007. / The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. Title from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on October 15, 2007) Vita. Includes bibliographical references.
42

Biogeochemical Response of a Northeastern Forest Ecosystem to Biosolids Amendments

Banaitis, Michael R. January 2007 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
43

Competence development in marine protected area professionals: a case study of the South African Marine Protected Area Management Training Course (SAMPATC)

Lewis, Sebastian Giulio January 2012 (has links)
This study reviews a training programme on Marine Protected Area (MPA) management. It notes that although MPAs are well promulgated under legislation, reports have found that there are still key challenges facing the management of these areas. The research examines how the course was developed following the Lemm and Attwood (2003) report and designed to develop competences for effective MPA management. The aim is to identify how a MPA management training course produced competences apposite to the workplace settings of the participants. An interpretive case study method was used, in two phases. The first phase explored salient issues in MPA management in South Africa through analysis of the two key ‘state of MPA management’ reports and interviews with MPA professionals. The second was an analysis of the South African Marine Protected Area Management Training Course. This involved interviews with course designers, a review of the course materials, interviews with past course participants, and an analysis of course evaluations. Evidence emerged that supported the following findings: Challenges and problems facing MPA management still exist. Competence in key areas of MPA management was addressed in an effective work-integrated approach. Social learning was a key process in the development of these competences. The competences articulate well with the workplace of participants. Gaps exist between some of the management issues and the competences developed by the course, and some aspects of the course design are ineffective. From these findings it is concluded that: The course took up the majority of issues in MPA management through the development of key competences. The course design facilitated the development of these competences. The competences developed through the course are relevant to the workplace of MPA professionals. The research found that the course adequately addresses issues in MPA management through the development of competences. Some recommendations for improvements are made.
44

Granivores as ecosystem regulators of woody plant increasers in semi-arid Savannas of the Lowveld, South Africa

Petersen, Leif Michael January 2006 (has links)
Magister Scientiae - MSc (Biodiversity and Conservation Biology) / In recent years, a global trend of increasing woody vegetation densities in semi-arid savanna habitats has been recorded, commonly described in South Africa as 'bush encroachment'. The shrubs and trees that do this (Increasers) have wrought significant economic and ecological impacts upon carrying capacities of large areas of savannas. This occurs, as suitable grazing areas are incrementally engulfed in shrubs and trees establishing new equilibria, from open savannas (essentially grasslands with scattered trees) into closed woodlands (treelands with scattered grasses). This thesis demonstrated a link between grass biomass, small mammal abundance and diversity, and their potential increaser seed/seedling predatory activities in the semi-arid Lowveld Savannas of South Africa. / South Africa
45

Phosphate-associated phenotype plasticity as a driver of cattail invasion in the sawgass-dominated Everglades

Unknown Date (has links)
In plants, phenotypic plasticity, the ability to morphologically adapt to new or broad environmental conditions, is a consequence of long-term evolutionary genetic processes. Thus, plants adapted to low phosphate (P) environments exhibit only limited plasticity to take advantage of nutrient enrichment, a global phenomenon in terrestrial and aquatic environments. In the face of anthropogenic P-enrichment, low nutrient adapted resident plant species are frequently displaced by species with high morphological and genetic plasticity. However, it remains unclear whether plasticity is systemically expressed across molecular, biochemical, physiological, and morphological processes that ultimately contribute to the root and shoot phenotypes of plants. In this study, we demonstrated high plasticity in root-borne traits of sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense), the dominant plant species of the P-impoverished Everglades, and counter the idea of inflexibility in low P adapted species. However, sawgras s expressed inflexibility in processes contributing to shoot phenotypes, in contrast to cattail, which was highly plastic in shoot characteristics vii in response to P enrichment. In fact, plasticity in cattail shoots is likely a function of its growth response to P that was globally regulated by P-availability at the level of transcription. Plasticity and inflexibility in the growth of both species also diverged in their allocation of P to the chloroplast for growth in cattail versus the vacuole for P storage in sawgrass. In the Everglades, anthropogenic P-enrichment has changed the environment from a P-limited condition, where plasticity in root-borne traits of sawgrass was advantageous, to one of light-competition, where plasticity in shoot-borne traits drives competitive dominance by cattail. / We hypothesize that these shifts in plasticity competitive advantage from root to shoots has been a major driver of cattail expansion in the Everglades ecosystem. Further, this understanding of how natural plant species adapt and shift in response to nutrient availability could also be used a model system to optimize agricultural systems to increase efficiencies in food production and protect low nutrient adapted natural systems from cultural eutrophication. / by James Webb. / Vita. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2010. / Includes bibliography. / Electronic reproduction. Boca Raton, Fla., 200?. Mode of access: World Wide Web.
46

Development of a remote sensing technique for woody vegetation in Rotenberger Wildlife Management Area

Unknown Date (has links)
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission lacks a viable method for monitoring woody vegetation in expansive wetland communities, such as the Florida Everglades. This study used aerial photographs of Rotenberger Wildlife Management Area in southeastern Palm Beach County, Florida to develop techniques for remotely monitoring changes in woody vegetation. Imagery from 2006, 2008, and 2010 were classified into woody and non-woody categories using Adobe Photoshop's Magic Wand Tool. Selection was performed with a bias toward over classification, as project objectives required identifying as many trees as possible. Classified pixels in Time 1 within 4 feet (2 pixels) of classified pixels from Time 2 were considered the same canopy. Overall accuracy for the study was 98%. / by Sarah Franklin. / Thesis (M.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2011. / Includes bibliography. / Electronic reproduction. Boca Raton, Fla., 2011. Mode of access: World Wide Web.
47

Legacies of forest management and fire in mixed-pine forest ecosystems of the Seney National Wildlife Refuge, eastern Upper Michigan

Rist, Stephen George. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Ohio State University, 2008. / Title from first page of PDF file. Includes bibliographical references (p. 74-79).
48

Examining effectiveness of Oregon's forest practice rules for maintaining warm-season maximum stream temperature patterns in the Oregon Coast Range /

Fleuret, Jennifer Marie. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Oregon State University, 2007. / Printout. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 102-110). Also available on the World Wide Web.
49

Empirical modeling of windthrow occurrence in streamside buffer strips /

Drake, Timothy P. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Oregon State University, 2009. / Printout. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 78-85). Also available on the World Wide Web.
50

Granivores as ecosystem regulators of woody plant increasers in semi-arid Savannas of the Lowveld, South Africa.

Petersen, Leif Michael. January 2006 (has links)
<p>In recent years, a global trend of increasing woody vegetation densities in semi-arid savanna habitats has been recorded, commonly described in South Africa as 'bush encroachment'. The shrubs and trees that do this (Increasers) have wrought significant economic and ecological impacts upon carrying capacities of large areas of savannas. This occurs, as suitable grazing areas are incrementally engulfed in shrubs and trees establishing new equilibria, from open savannas (essentially grasslands with scattered trees) into closed woodlands (treelands with scattered grasses). This thesis demonstrated a link between grass biomass, small mammal abundance and diversity, and their potential increaser seed/seedling predatory activities in the semi-arid Lowveld Savannas of South Africa.</p>

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