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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

An investigation into the relationship between good corporate governance and corporate sustainability: the case of public further education and training colleges in Gauteng province of South Africa.

Muswaba, Manager Mhangarai. January 2012 (has links)
D.Tech. Business Administration. Business School. / Assess the extent to which good corporate governance and corporate sustainability are practiced by all 128 public Further Education and Training (FET) college council members in the Gauteng Province of South Africa. Since 1998, the governance of public FET colleges has moved to the forefront of the political agenda in the Republic of South Africa. Among the governance issues which have received most attention are council board appointments, the role of the Government in the management of public FET colleges and the role of the community in the governing of public FET colleges.
2

A framework to implement social entrepreneurship activities in higher education institutions

Tai Hing, Paul January 2017 (has links)
The development of social enterprises are recognised by the broader community as an effective tool for addressing social problems. As a result, the development and emergence of social enterprise sectors have taken various paths in different geographic regions in the world. For the African context, the withdrawal of funding from the state as a result of external conditions imposed by foreign actors as well as the institutional support provided by foreign aid organisations were the key drivers behind the emergence of the social enterprise sector in Africa. Within the South African context, job creation and poverty alleviation are pressing priorities, both politically and economically, so providing an environment that is conducive for the development of social enterprises or social entrepreneurship. Implementing social entrepreneurship activities in higher education is important as universities are under increasing pressure to become responsive to student needs, and there is a growing scrutiny of their engagement, supportive, and economic role in local communities. By supporting local communities, institutions can broaden the student experience and create an economic impact. In addition, as the student experience entails more than curricular learning opportunities, social entrepreneurship practices are an important dimension for higher learning. This study used a series of case studies of social entrepreneurship projects that were implemented in the classroom of the first and second year Management students on the 2nd Avenue Campus of the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU). These case studies highlighted the possibilities of how classroom space and students can be utilised to set-up social enterprises to improve the conditions of the many disadvantaged and disenfranchised communities within which the university functions. At the same time, learning takes place through the practical application of the theory taught in the classroom. From the seven case studies highlighted in the study, a framework was developed to implement social entrepreneurship activities in the context of higher education. This framework includes five steps, namely, motivation and inspiration to develop social enterprises in the classroom, student involvement in creating and developing a product for sale, use of appropriate teaching strategies to provide the learning experience, provision of adequate mentoring and control of the social enterprises and, finally, assessment of the social enterprises. With the funds generated from the projects, communities benefited, for example, the upgrading of community facilities. Educators in higher education institutions are responsible for developing future business leaders. Given the increasing importance of social issues, especially poverty, this educational experience ensured that the students were made aware of the importance of using the powers yielded by business to solve some of these social issues, and thus contribute to the improvement of the South African economy. As a result, social entrepreneurship has a role to play in addressing social and economic issues. For example, the entrepreneurship part of the business will help to alleviate the unemployment strain placed upon the South African economy, whereas, the social part of the business will assist in alleviating poverty. Regarding the implementation of social entrepreneurship activities within the environment of higher education, it is evident from the case studies that successful social enterprises can be established within the classroom and sufficient funds generated to effect positive change within disadvantaged communities. Other higher education institutions in South Africa may find the implementation of social entrepreneurship activities more problematic as they might not possess a similar university culture as the NMMU.
3

An approach to the strategic governance of educational technology at universities of technology

Sadie, Alida Jeanetta. January 2012 (has links)
D.Tech. Organisational Leadership. Business School. / The research problem for this thesis reads as follows: Educational technology within Universities of Technology is not strategically governed and managed, resulting in the underutilisation of resources impacting on the achievement of strategic goals and objectives. The primary research question therefor follows: Can a strategic approach be formulated to mitigate the research problem to benefit Universities of Technology? Questions explored in the thesis are: What business principles and managerial strategies can be applied in the formulation of a governance scenario for effective educational technology governance? What are the key national and international strategic driving forces that influence institutional governance? What are the key strategic driving forces that influence governance at the Tshwane University of Technology?
4

A critical analysis of transfer, articulation and master planning in tertiary education in California (1960-1988) and a resultant model for the RSA

Shippey, Theodore Clive January 1990 (has links)
Thesis (Masters Diploma (Post -School Education)) -- Cape Technikon, Cape Town, 1990 / The main hypothesis underlining this study is the belief that the great emphasis on "transfer" and "articulation" in tertiary education in California contains lessons for the tertiary sector in the RSA. Such lessons can fruitfully be examined with a view to intelligent, selective adaptation. In California an extremely flexible pattern of mobility exists between the four systems of tertiary education, namely the University of California (UC) (9 campuses), the California State University (CSU) (19 campuses), the Community Colleges (CCs) (106 campuses), and the Private/Independent sector (377 campuses). This pattern contrasts strikingly with the relatively inflexible approach in the RSA where transfer and articulation between the universities, technikons and colleges of education are not generally encouraged and do not occur too frequently. The creation of a model in the RSA which incorporates the most constructive elements of the systems in California is one of the primary objectives of this study. In the creation of this model cognisance has been taken of the many similarities and also the considerable differences in the economic, social, historical and physical conditions which exist in the RSA and in California. Every attempt has been made to avoid errors of "transplantation" which could easily take place. The key word in this study is "adaptation" and not the direct "transfer" of ideas since an eclectic approach, if applied too literally, can easily lead to an imposition of alien concepts. This study is therefore aimed primarily at focusing attention on the need for greater ''mobility'' among the tertiary education sectors in the RSA and in stimulating constructive moves in this direction. A secondary hypothesis underlying this study is the assumption that the 1960 Master Plan for Higher Education in California has proved successful and worthy of emulation in certain respects. This assumption has led to an examination of the California Plan with a view to the possible adaptation of some of its successful principles - other than "transfer" and "articulation" - in order to formulate the basis for a much needed Master Plan for Tertiary Education in the RSA. Implicit in this secondary hypothesis is a brief analysis of those aspects of the California Master Plan such as budgeting, funding, examining, control of standards, and so on, which have contributed to the success which has been achieved in California during the last three decades. This analysis is inevitably followed by a consideration of these points in the South African context in order that any constructive ideas may be incorporated or adapted to the conditions prevailing in the RSA. The universality of certain educational principles emerges clearly from this study as do the undeniable virtues of careful, logical studies of other educational systems in order that one may be in a stronger position to assess and improve one's own system.
5

A Framework for enhancing organisational performance through knowledge sharing

Mashilo, Magdeline Mmapula January 2010 (has links)
Thesis (MTech. Degree. Knowledge management ) / Organisational performance is a manifestation of knowledge sharing, which has an effect on the overall competitiveness of an organisation. Knowledge shapes individual actions and behaviours, which sometimes conflict with the norms, structures and systems of the organisation. A knowledge gap was identified amongst employees at higher institutions of learning in South Africa. It enables some employees to perform their jobs more effectively than others. Knowledgeable employees are expected to share their knowledge with others to increase productivity and efficiency within their environment. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. Generally, employees may behave differently within an organisation due to their diverse background or according to their skills and stock of knowledge. Two case studies were conducted to investigate the impact of knowledge sharing on organisational performance. Factors affecting knowledge sharing were identified from the findings of both case studies. A framework was developed to encourage the flow of knowledge sharing that will enhance overall performance in organisations, particularly at higher institutions of learning. Contingency theory was employed in the analysis of the data.
6

The idea of the university in South Africa today / Untitled

Pillay, Krishnavani January 2009 (has links)
This thesis aims to examine the concept of the university in contemporary South Africa. The aim of this thesis evolves from the question, what is the idea of the university in contemporary South Africa? This question evolves from my current experiences as an academic in a contemporary South African university. My colleagues and I are faced with many epistemological challenges on a daily basis as we try to teach our students, by providing them with both access to higher education as well as epistemological access, as we try and transform our curricula from an Apartheid determined one, to one that is more congruent with the values of our new dispensation, and which at the same time will contribute to the coherent development of both our universities and our country. Central to these issues and practices is a particular understanding of a university in our context. This priority is very challenging in a context such as ours which has a rich history of a politically determined, highly differentiated university sector. A direct consequence of this legacy is an unclear and shared understanding of a university in our country at present. What is currently required in our university and broader context is more determined thinking about a concept of the university in this country. In order to examine the concept of a university in contemporary South Africa, I engaged in a conceptual analysis. In so doing I divided my thesis into two parts, on the basis of the two conceptual analysis techniques which I used. In Part one I constructed a Model Example, and in the second part I applied this Model Example (scope of application) to different contexts. My Model example of a concept of a university is predicated on a Theory of concepts; a Theory of institutions, a Theory of practices, a theory of Inquiry and a Theory of Higher Education. I then examine the concept of a university in South Africa, by focusing on an examination of the concept of a university in different chronological and geographical contexts. In this part of my thesis I engage in examining the scope of applicability of a particular concept of a university. I examine the concept of a university firstly at a more historical level, by going back to Cardinal Newman, Von Humboldt and Jaspers. This examination is important to the contemporary concept of the university in South Africa, as our current concept of a university still attempts to hold onto the components that characterised the concept of the university that these historical figures were instrumental in developing. I then go on to examine a concept of a university in Germany and America, as contemporary South Africa has extended its borders to become part of a more globally competitive context. In so doing the concept of the university in contemporary South Africa is also at the same time, influenced by the kinds of developments in such countries. I then go on to examine a concept of a university during Apartheid South Africa, to provide a context for current change initiatives in this sector. The last two chapters focus on the post Apartheid university context. On the basis of two seminal higher education policy documents, I extrapolate a concept of a university in the contemporary South African policy context. I then go on to examine how this concept of a university is impacting on current transformatory initiatives in contemporary universities. In attempting to examine an idea of a university in a contemporary South African context, I had to grapple with an array of issues. But the most fundamental challenge for me was trying to clarify an essentially contentious concept. What emerges continuously from an examination of a concept of a university is the tension that has existed and which continues to exist, between the social responsibilities of a public institution such as a university; and its traditionally established epistemological functions. Most conflicts and disillusionment regarding this concept and its use, is predicated on the challenge of trying to establish how a university can be both relevant and valuable to society and still maintain its epistemic authority and value. The South African context further complicates this dilemma, because central to our transformatory goals is a particular world view that we as South Africans regard as valuable. Such a world view is based on the social epistemology and ontology of Ubuntu. This world view comes up constantly in policy documents and discourses that underpin the university terrain. I set out to examine the idea of the university in contemporary South Africa within the parameters of such a context and world view. It is against such a backdrop that I construct a Model Example of a concept of a university. My model example acknowledges both the socio-political functions and identity of a university; as well as its constitutive epistemological functions and identity. Central to such an understanding is the imperative to maintain a dialogical balance between these two important functions. Although this thesis goes into deep epistemological regions, it just skims the surface of such an exciting epistemological terrain. What it does do however, is open up an alternate perspective on how to try and understand a concept of a university and extend its scope of applicability in a variety of ways.
7

Pivotal role of the UNISA council in corporate governance

Nobatyi, Andile January 2011 (has links)
There have been calls the world over for academic institutions to adopt corporate forms of management. Unisa Council declared its commitment to corporate governance in the Annual report 2009. This study aims to determine whether Unisa Council activities and decisions comply with corporate governance as per the King III Code and identify any area(s) of improvement. Case study research was undertaken to investigate compliance with the principles of good governance as recommended in the Code. A checklist was used to collect data from university documents and this data was analysed by pattern matching. Unisa performance was then compared with that of University of KwaZulu-Natal. Unisa Council performed 91percent of recommended practices and thereby complied with 87 percent of principles of good governance as per the King III Code on Corporate Governance. Unisa did not comply with three principles and neither complied nor not-complied with five principles as the level of performance of corresponding recommended practices was below the threshold of 75 percent. UKZN achieved 91 percent performance of the recommended practices and thereby obtained 87 percent compliance. The study also showed that practicing corporate forms of management to improve academic governance does not necessarily relegate academic interest to lower levels. This means that these institutions delivered on their mandate from the Higher Education Act, 1997 (as amended). Unisa and UKZN are primarily public institutions of higher education and not profit driven, despite them embracing corporate forms of management.
8

An evaluation of the factors affecting student success at a South African higher education institution : implications for management

Watkiss, Sheralyn Ann January 2011 (has links)
The context of this study centres on Higher Education in South Africa, the role that this sector plays in terms of economic development and the implications that face Institutional management in retaining students in the Higher Education system. Central to this study is the notion that student development theory can be used as a basis towards understanding the customers of Higher Education, how to better serve the customers needs and finally, retain students in the system through more effective management practices. The education sector is growing at an increasingly rapid rate as a result of strategic goals of countries and organisations such as the United Nations promoting the notion of education for all people (Altbach, Reisberg & Rumbley, 2009). The aim of the strategic goals adopted by developing countries in particular is to enhance the human capital or skills and knowledge of its people since education is a known contributor towards economic, social and political development. Higher Education in particular is known to contribute towards the human capital and economic development of a country. The Higher Education sector in South Africa for instance contributes approximately 1.5 percent to the country‟s gross domestic product (GDP), significantly higher than other industry sectors (apart from gold and agriculture) in the country (van Heerden, Bohlmann, Giesecke, Makochekanwa, & Roos, 2007). Figure 1.1 provides a context of the relevant importance of the higher education sector towards economic growth.
9

Job embeddedness and organisational commitment as predictors of voluntary turnover at a South African higher education institution

Tebele, Cebile 04 September 2013 (has links)
The objectives of this study were to determine whether job embeddedness and organisational commitment significantly predict voluntary turnover, and whether people from different gender, race and age groups differ significantly in their job embeddedness, organisational commitment and voluntary turnover. The Job Embeddedness Scale (JES), Organisational Commitment Scale (OCS) and Voluntary Turnover Scale (VTS) were used as measuring instruments. A stratified random sample of 102 full-time employed higher education academics participated in the study. Multiple regression analyses showed that organisation fit and community links and normative commitment significantly and positively predicted the participants’ intentions to stay at the institution. Significant differences were observed between the job embeddedness and intention to stay of the gender and race groups. The findings of the current study add to the knowledge base on the turnover intentions of academic staff, contributing to the field of career psychology. In conclusion, the study makes recommendations for retention practices and future research. / Industrial & Organisational Psychology / M. Com. (Industrial and Organisational Psychology)
10

Job embeddedness and organisational commitment as predictors of voluntary turnover at a South African higher education institution

Tebele, Cebile 11 1900 (has links)
The objectives of this study were to determine whether job embeddedness and organisational commitment significantly predict voluntary turnover, and whether people from different gender, race and age groups differ significantly in their job embeddedness, organisational commitment and voluntary turnover. The Job Embeddedness Scale (JES), Organisational Commitment Scale (OCS) and Voluntary Turnover Scale (VTS) were used as measuring instruments. A stratified random sample of 102 full-time employed higher education academics participated in the study. Multiple regression analyses showed that organisation fit and community links and normative commitment significantly and positively predicted the participants’ intentions to stay at the institution. Significant differences were observed between the job embeddedness and intention to stay of the gender and race groups. The findings of the current study add to the knowledge base on the turnover intentions of academic staff, contributing to the field of career psychology. In conclusion, the study makes recommendations for retention practices and future research. / Industrial and Organisational Psychology / M. Com. (Industrial and Organisational Psychology)

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