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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The introduction of computer networking and activities in K-12 classrooms : a case study of a secondary school

Silva, Marcos, 1953- January 1998 (has links)
The purpose of this research is to document data on the implementation and integration of computer networking capabilities and activities in regular classrooms, looking specifically at the expectations and concerns of those involved (school administrators and teachers), and at the issue of integrating the networking capabilities with the regular curriculum. The outcomes of the research will be recommendations on practices that produce successful or unsuccessful implementation of network-based classroom activities. Particular attention is given to Internet-based K--12 classroom activities and to the creation of electronic communities of learners.
2

The status of data-processing services in the public schools of Indiana with supporting case studies revealing patterns of organization of existingregional data-processing centers in adjoining states

Wagner, Ivan D. January 1970 (has links)
The purpose of the study was to determine the status of electronic data processing services and/or functions in the public schools of Indiana. To provide additional insight to the organizational structure of a data processing center, four existing regional data processing centers serving a group of school districts in adjoining states through a centrally located computer facility were examined. The procedures used in collecting and analyzing the data for the study included the following: (1) appropriate data gathering instruments were designed, (2) a questionnaire accompanied by a cover letter explaining the purpose of the study was mailed to each superintendent of all school corporations in Indiana, (3) a personal interview was conducted with the administrative personnel directly responsible for the operation of each of the four selected regional data processing centers, (3) data obtained from the questionnaire and the personal interview were compiled, tabulated, analyzed, and presented, and (4) the findings, conclusions and recommendations for further study were presented. The superintendents were asked to respond to the question, "Do you presently utilize data processing (computer and punch card) equipment in any part of the operation and/or administration of your school district?" Those school administrators responding "YES" were then asked to indicate those services and functions which were accomplished in their school corporation, to indicate the method of obtaining data processing services and to indicate methods. All of the superintendents were asked to indicate their future plans for the use of data processing services in their local school corporation(s). The systematic analysis of the procedures necessary for implementing educational data processing services to a group of school districts in adjoining states included the following elements: (1) background information, (2) objectives, (3) historical development, (4) equipment, (5) personnel, (6) services and/or functions, (7) orientation procedures, (8) advantages of a central computer facility, (9) disadvantages of a central computer facility, and (10) future plans. The findings indicated the following major general conclusions to be appropriate the level of their satisfaction with both services. There has been only limited development toward the organization of educational data processing systems throughout the state of Indiana. This situation lends itself to collective exploration by interested school administrators toward cooperative arrangements of obtaining data processing services, regardless of the size of the school district. Qualified and competent personnel must be responsible for the operation of the data processing center. The director of the data processing center should be totally familiar with all facets of school administration so that he may use electronic data processing services to facilitate the instructional program. A central computer facility organized to provide electronic data processing services to a group of school districts is capable of supporting the more sophisticated computer equipment at a reduction in cost, provided the equipment is operating at a near capacity work load. It is possible for a group of school districts to benefit from the developmental experience of existing data processing centers. The amount of time once considered necessary to progress from feasibility of operation to full-scale implementation has been greatly reduced by administrators' capitalizing on the systematic developments of existing regional data processing centers.School districts involved in data processing can benefit from the efforts of an administrative officer whose function is to systematically analyze administrative operations. This individual is referred to as a systems analyst or operations analyst. Teleprocessing has great potential for providing electronic data processing services to school districts regardless of size. Teleprocessing provides school administrators with direct access to sophisticated electronic data processing equipment and computer programs which have been successfully developed and implemented in other school districts. The Indiana Department of Education should assume the leadership in establishing regional service centers throughout Indiana to provide comprehensive educational data processing services to local school districts.Colleges and universities should serve as a catalyst of ideas for the intelligent use of electronic data processing services to perform administrative and instructional functions.
3

The introduction of computer networking and activities in K-12 classrooms : a case study of a secondary school

Silva, Marcos, 1953- January 1998 (has links)
No description available.
4

Information communications technologies in education : a Faustian bargain?

Thomas, Charalambos Bob. January 2001 (has links)
There is currently a glaring absence of critical discourse surrounding the integration of information communications technologies in schools. Despite a growing body of literature showing that technology has both advantages and disadvantages, schools are incorporating ICT as if it were a panacea for educational and societal ills. This deification of ICT is based on utilitarian concerns and spiritual yearnings. The first chapter situates the author and outlines how the larger technology metanarrative has a mythic status. Chapter two situates the appeal to utilitarian and spiritual values in the wider culture. The final chapter examines how these issues are played out in the school system. The author concludes with a summary and raises areas for further investigation, along with suggestions for change.
5

An investigation into the viability of deploying thin client technology to support effective learning in a disadvantaged, rural high school setting

Ndwe, Tembalethu Jama January 2002 (has links)
Computer Based Training offers many attractive learning opportunities for high school pupils. Its deployment in economically depressed and educationally marginalized rural schools is extremely uncommon due to the high technology skills and costs involved in its deployment and ongoing maintenance. This thesis puts forward thin client technology as a potential solution to the needs of education environments of this kind. A functional business case is developed and evaluated in this thesis, based upon a requirements analysis of media delivery in learning, and upon formal cost/performance models and a deployment field trial. Because of the economic constraints of the envisaged deployment area in rural education, an industrial field trial is used, and the aspects of this trial that can be carried over to the rural school situation have been used to assess performance and cost indicators. Our study finds that thin client technology could be deployed and maintained more cost effectively than conventional fat client solutions in rural schools, that it is capable of supporting the learning elements needed in this deployment area, and that it is able to deliver the predominantly text based applications currently being used in schools. However, we find that technological improvements are needed before future multimediaintensive applications can be adequately supported.
6

Information communications technologies in education : a Faustian bargain?

Thomas, Charalambos Bob. January 2001 (has links)
No description available.
7

Dimensional extension: towards a unifying framework for instructional systems. / CUHK electronic theses & dissertations collection

January 1996 (has links)
by Albert Kam-Wah Wu. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1996. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 126-136). / Electronic reproduction. Hong Kong : Chinese University of Hong Kong, [2012] System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader. Available via World Wide Web. / Mode of access: World Wide Web.
8

A study of the application of emerging technology: teacher and student perceptions of the impact of one-to-one laptop computer access

Niles, Rae 05 1900 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to describe and identify Sedgwick High School’s teacher and student perceptions of the impact of one-to-one laptop computer access using an appreciative inquiry theoretical research perspective and the theoretical frameworks of change and paradigm shift. An appreciative inquiry theoretical research perspective was used to structure a qualitative, embedded descriptive case study design. An embedded case study design was used to describe the perceptions of high school teachers and their students who were involved in a one-to-one laptop computer wireless environment on student learning and how teachers teach. Data were collected through teacher and student focus groups, as well as administration of the Left-Hand Right-Hand Column Case Method. Data were analyzed using the comparative analysis matrix method (Miles & Huberman, 1994). The analyzed data revealed six salient findings: (1) Students functioned in the capacity of teacher, (2) technology changed the way teachers and students communicated, (3) the culture of the classroom dynamics between teacher and student changed, (4) technology made learning enjoyable for students, (5) teachers and students believed immersion in a technology-rich learning environment created advantages for student success after high school graduation, and (6) teachers believed that access to ubiquitous technology created new challenges for maintaining student engagement in the learning process. Five of the six findings suggested that technology had changed teaching and learning, and helped to create a paradigm shift in the teacher and student roles. Additionally, those findings also identified the positive core of Sedgwick High School, serving to describe the life giving forces within the organization. One of the six findings revealed challenges associated with the application of emerging technology in the classroom. The findings from this study have the potential to contribute to areas of study that focus on the use of technology in schools. Moreover, research from this study has the potential to help serve as a foundation for other school leaders who are seeking opportunities that prepare students for life in the technology-rich 21st Century through one-to-one laptop computer access. / Thesis (Ed.D.)--Wichita State University, College of Education. / "May 2006." / Includes bibliographic references (leaves 129-145).
9

An architecture for adaptive computer-assisted instruction programs for complex dynamic systems

Fath, Janet Louise 08 1900 (has links)
No description available.
10

The impact of ubiquitous computing on a teacher's practice : factors and conditions affecting the operationalizing of a constructivist teaching philosophy

Ransom, Stephen M. January 2003 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of how ubiquitous computing would affect an elementary teacher's ability to more fully operationalize her existing constructivist teaching philosophy.Research on computing technologies in K-12 schools has documented that there are numerous important barriers to technology integration in the classroom, one of which is access to computer technologies. In addition, the research documents that new technologies can act as a catalyst toward teacher change of instructional practices over time when using such technologies for teaching and learning. The literature also suggests that a teacher's use of computing technologies may contribute to a shift toward more constructivist teaching practices. Ubiquitous computing technologies are becoming more and more prevalent in K-12 schools and are removing the barriers of sufficient access and related issues of infrastructure, making it increasingly feasible to study the impact of computer-saturated environments on teaching and learning.This qualitative single case study investigated the impact of full-time in school computer ubiquity via wireless laptops for every student and the teacher in a fifth grade classroom during the 2002-2003 school year. Qualitative methods were used in the gathering and analysis of multiple forms of data.Findings1.Key enabling conditions of ubiquitous technology-supported constructivist practices were (i) peer support and collaboration, (ii) ubiquitous access to information, curriculum, and tools, (iii) time to plan, implement, and assess inquiry-based instruction, (iv) technical support, technical knowledge, and reliable hardware, and (v) software to support student construction of knowledge and projects.2. This teacher's preexisting pedagogical beliefs positively impacted her ability to implement and sustain a shift toward more constructivist teaching practices.3.Computing ubiquity facilitated this teacher's (i) planning for inquiry-based learning activities, (ii) ability to remain flexible and spontaneous, (iii) desire and motivation to pursue her own professional inquiry, (iv) it reduced the amount of risk required to make and sustain changes of pedagogy coupled with high technology use, and (v) it accelerated the time required to assume ownership of a technological innovation.This study concludes with the suggestion for a new model of ubiquitouscomputing based upon the findings of this study. / Department of Elementary Education

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