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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
51

Relationships among urban students' identification with school, and students', teachers', and parents' perceptions of academic press and safety, and reading achievement

Parson, Kyleah A. 01 January 2012 (has links)
No description available.
52

Color of Discipline: Reducing Discipline Disparities through the Use of School-Wide Discipline Programs

Unknown Date (has links)
Disparities in school discipline for Black students has been a problem for decades. The negative effects of exclusionary discipline have been well-documented. This problem must be addressed by educational stakeholders in order to take steps to reduce the issue and provide interventions to reduce the disproportionality. Disproportionality in discipline prevents schools from achieving the ultimate goal of fostering positive outcomes for all students. School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Support Programs have created a systems-level approach to reducing overall school discipline issues. Some studies have identified SW-PBIS programs that have been able to reduce disparities in secondary schools and increase graduation rates, however, studies of SW-PBIS and disproportionality have overlooked disparities in elementary schools. The present study contributed to the current research base by investigating elementary disparity rates and how schools are using a SW-PBIS system to lower those rates. It also identifies factors that create strong programs successful in reducing disparity rates as well as factors that hinder the success of schools with disparity problems. This qualitative analysis revealed four themes that are critical to the success of a SW-PBIS system in lowering disparity rates: training, finding the root of the negative behavior, high expectations, and support for teachers. Implications for professional development, data tracking, and measuring disproportionality in schools are discussed. / A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education. / Summer Semester 2018. / May 17, 2018. / Discipline Disparities, SW-PBIS / Includes bibliographical references. / Stacey Rutledge, Professor Directing Dissertation; Ithel Jones, University Representative; Helen Boyle, Committee Member; Motoko Akiba, Committee Member.
53

Title I Funding in High-Poverty Schools: Is Equal Opportunity Really Equal?

Unknown Date (has links)
The purpose of this research was to generate an understanding of the impact of Title I funding on high-poverty schools. Although the Title I policy was designed to provide supplemental funding to high poverty schools, research has uncovered that the highest poverty schools are not always the schools that receive the supplemental funds. This study was motivation by two research questions: (1) How do teachers and administrators in two schools in a Central Florida school district describe their experiences of working within high-poverty schools in years with and without Title I funding; and (2) How do the cases of these two schools help us understand the impact of the Title I funding allocation processes on the working of schools in one school district in Central Florida? Through a qualitative research approach these research questions were answered. Interviews were conducted across two school sites to explore the experiences of teachers and administrators within two high-poverty schools in years with and without Title I funding. The findings revealed that the loss of support that Title I funding provided caused a negative impact on the morale of teachers and students. / A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education. / Summer Semester 2018. / May 11, 2018. / equitable education, equity in schools, funding in schools, high-poverty schools, students living in poverty, Title I / Includes bibliographical references. / Ayesha Khurshid, Professor Directing Dissertation; Steve McDowell, University Representative; Robert Schwartz, Committee Member; Stephanie Zuilkowski, Committee Member.
54

What Fire Chiefs Think and Organizational Directors Know: A Study of the Potential Benefits of Higher Education for the Fire Service

Unknown Date (has links)
The fire chiefs of today realize the importance of higher education. This is evident in the seminal works of the 1966 Wing Spread I conference and the United States Fire Administration’s Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education Project (FESHE). Organizational directors charged with the responsibilities of recruiting and employing a fire chief must understand the educational qualifications needed to find the best candidate using available resources. This mixed methods study explored organizational directors’ and fire chiefs’ perceptions on the evolving educational, professional credentialing, and experience requirements for the fire chief position. The study provides a foundation for aspiring fire chiefs to base future educational attainment goals. This study also highlights organizational directors’ perspectives on what current fire chiefs should attain regarding educational requirements for the position. The mixed methods approach demonstrated that the quantitative study results were more than adequate to provide a snap shot of Florida’s Fire Service in regards to their perception of necessity for higher education in the development of future officers. The qualitative results provided additional valuable information regarding the five themes deemed necessary to further enhance the qualitative experience. These themes included Perseverance, Experience, Position Relevant Roles and Responsibilities, Mentorship and Information Management. The rich personal experiences provided by the interviewees expounded in way that provided a real world perspective of the rewards and challenges of attaining higher education. / A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education. / Spring Semester 2018. / March 1, 2018. / Fire Chief, Fire service professional, Higher Education, Professional Devolopment / Includes bibliographical references. / Kristal Moore Clemons, Professor Co-Directing Dissertation; Ayesha Khurshid, Professor Co-Directing Dissertation; Stephen McDowell, University Representative; Stephanie Zuilkowski, Committee Member; Robert Schwartz, Committee Member.
55

A Comparative Document Analysis on Early Childhood Teacher State Requirements, NAEYC Standards and Developmental Theories

Spirakus, Maria 23 January 2019 (has links)
<p> The gap between our current understanding of child development and public policies related to the early childhood education workforce continues to grow (Shonkoff, 2002). This gap may lead to the hiring of individuals who are not equipped with a foundation of child development theories which is fundamental to meeting the needs of children in the early childhood range (birth through age eight). The purpose of this study is to examine the recommendations regarding early childhood standards for preparation programs both from the literature and pre-service teacher preparation programs as found in certification/credentialing programs of early childhood pre-service teachers. </p><p> Early childhood education teacher preparation is key to building a successful foundation for future academic success for young learners (Mooney, 2013). Gordon &amp; Browne (2017) noted that becoming a professional teacher takes time, knowledge, training, and experience. Teacher preparation standards &ldquo;are intended to ensure that teachers have the skills necessary to help children master the prescribed content&rdquo; (Feeney, 2012, p. 40). Many theorists, such as Dewey, Montessori, Erikson, Piaget and Vygotsky provide us with their findings on the importance of early childhood development (Mooney, 2013). Teachers in early childhood education should build upon these theories and apply them in their classrooms. When newly graduated teachers are in classrooms with ten or more students, they need to have the ability to connect with their students and an understanding about how their students learn and grow.</p><p>
56

Understanding selective college access for minority, low-income high school students

Jennett, Pauline Elizabeth 06 June 2017 (has links)
The purpose of this investigation was to explore a contextual intervention of effective college advising programs for ethnic minority students that helps them acquire the skills and personal dispositions necessary to apply to, get into, and stay at selective colleges and universities. Utilizing a regression analysis, this analytical study examined 199 low-income minority high school students in a contextual college intervention program from 2014 to 2015. The central hypothesis being tested was that intervention programs that were successful at getting lower income ethnic minority youth to apply to, get into, and stay at selective colleges and universities attract and maintain students with higher levels of personal factors, especially factors of resilience such as motivation, grit, and perseverance. The research questions sought to examine the relationship between effective college advising programs for minority, low-income students (contextual intervention) and what social and emotional or resilient skills (personal factors) their students possess to become college and career ready, and whether possessing these skills differentiates those students who are accepted into highly selective colleges from those who are accepted to less selective colleges. A growing body of research demonstrates that admittance to selective colleges often leads to increased social status, higher income, and improved job opportunities. It has been demonstrated that getting into a highly selective college matters. Caucasian and minority students alike who graduate from highly selective colleges experience increased lifetime earnings and prestige (Bowen, 1998, Avery, 2003). A total of 199 minority high school student participants were surveyed during their senior year in high school. Survey items were drawn from Solberg’s Success Model Survey (2007) and Duckworth’s Grit Model (2007). Duckworth validated a self-report questionnaire called the Grit Scale where “Grit” is defined as trait-level perseverance and passion for long-term goals. Solberg’s Success Model Survey is a composite of several scales: Career Search Self-Efficacy, Goal-Setting, and Motivation to Attend School; Academic Self-Efficacy; and Social Connections. (Sample survey questions in Table section.) The dataset also included participant demographic data, program participation information, and college admit results. This investigation tested Coleman’s (2006) Minority Student Achievement Model to demonstrate that significant personal factors including academic ability, diligent use of resources, perseverance, and strategic involvement in youth development initiatives, combined with a successful college contextual intervention, were significant indicators regarding increased admittance to selective colleges.
57

District and School Leadership Perceptions of School Turnaround and Teacher Advancement Program (TAP) Reform Practices

Bernard, Ladale Lemoine 12 April 2019 (has links)
<p> With an increased focus on school accountability and school improvement, efforts to quickly improve or turnaround low performing schools are on the rise. School turnaround is a complex concept with a myriad of social, political, and economic aspects (CPRE, 2013, p. 8). While each school is different, there are generally several practices and changes, that if addressed will result in quick improvements among most low performing schools. This dissertation addressed perceptions of district and school leaders, the importance of climate and culture in the turnaround process, and the support needed to sustain the positive efforts in the turnaround process. The overarching research question that guided this study was, what leadership practices do school leaders and district leaders believe are vital to the turnaround process? </p><p>
58

An Exploration of the Relationship Between Leadership Styles and School Culture in a Small Rural Southeast Missouri School District

Blissett, Kimberley 15 April 2019 (has links)
No description available.
59

The Black Inside the Blue| Black Law Enforcement Officers' Perceptions of Racial Profiling in Missouri

Green, Clarence, Jr. 15 April 2019 (has links)
<p> Nationally, law enforcement agencies are under tremendous scrutiny in reference to racial profiling. A gap exists in knowledge of Black law enforcement officers&rsquo; in Missouri perceptions of racial profiling. Missouri has experienced a disproportionate number of traffic stops of Black motorists for the last 11 years. A review of the literature revealed that police officers have an identity formed through practices of the organization. This notion was further explained by examining social-identity theory and the key concepts of Black law enforcement officers, racial profiling, and occupational socialization. This qualitative bounded case study used semistructured interviews with rural Black law enforcement officers from three counties in Missouri, conducted three focus groups with community members, and performed an artifact review of law enforcement agencies&rsquo; policies. The following themes emerged: racial profiling is not tolerated, law enforcement officers are held accountable for their behavior, Black law enforcement officers joined agencies because they wanted the ability to help others, Blacks are racially profiled more than others, racial profiling had been experienced, confidence existed in law enforcement agencies to not racially profile, and Blacks were perceived as bad people. These results allow law enforcement agencies and law enforcement training academies to address selection and training needs of officers. The results also aid policymakers to expand the collection of data around profiling as well as aid community leaders in understanding the dynamics of racial profiling. </p><p>
60

Title I Funding in High-Poverty Schools: Is Equal Opportunity Really Equal?

Unknown Date (has links)
The purpose of this research was to generate an understanding of the impact of Title I funding on high-poverty schools. Although the Title I policy was designed to provide supplemental funding to high poverty schools, research has uncovered that the highest poverty schools are not always the schools that receive the supplemental funds. This study was motivation by two research questions: (1) How do teachers and administrators in two schools in a Central Florida school district describe their experiences of working within high-poverty schools in years with and without Title I funding; and (2) How do the cases of these two schools help us understand the impact of the Title I funding allocation processes on the working of schools in one school district in Central Florida? Through a qualitative research approach these research questions were answered. Interviews were conducted across two school sites to explore the experiences of teachers and administrators within two high-poverty schools in years with and without Title I funding. The findings revealed that the loss of support that Title I funding provided caused a negative impact on the morale of teachers and students. / A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education. / Summer Semester 2018. / May 11, 2018. / equitable education, equity in schools, funding in schools, high-poverty schools, students living in poverty, Title I / Includes bibliographical references. / Ayesha Khurshid, Professor Directing Dissertation; Steve McDowell, University Representative; Robert Schwartz, Committee Member; Stephanie Zuilkowski, Committee Member.

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