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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
31

The Needs of Custodial Grandparents in Helping Their Grandchildren Experience School Success

Ward, Rex S. 19 May 2017 (has links)
<p> At a local middle school, twice as many students were being reared by their grandparents than in each of the other 3 schools in the study district. Most of these students were experiencing academic and social issues; increased understanding of the issue was needed to address these problems. Using a phenomenological approach, this project study explored the lived experiences of grandparents of skipped-generation households and school employees who interact daily with skipped-generation households. Epstein&rsquo;s theory of parental involvement undergirded this study, and semistructured interviews were used to gather data from 15 grandparents and 15 school employees. Interviews were transcribed, open coded, and themes were generated. Findings revealed that grandparents often did not understand the grandchildren&rsquo;s generation, 21st-century parenting skills, or how services from community agencies could make the rearing process easier. Also, school employees often did not understand the challenges faced by skipped-generation households, the importance of grandparent-friendly school environments, and the value of sharing internal information. Based on the findings, the Educators Impacting Skipped-Generation Household seminar was designed to inform school employees of strategies to assist grandparents in addressing their challenges, and create grandparent-friendly school environments. This study should improve the lives, relationships, and communication of members of skipped-generation households and school employees, while increasing the number of successful students and citizens who can break this parenting cycle. </p>
32

Quintero's Intervention Paragon Ensures Academic Success for Secondary Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities

Ochoa, Marianne De Jesus Quintero 01 June 2017 (has links)
<p> With poor retention and low high school graduation rates, students with learning disabilities present challenges to secondary teachers. The purpose of this mixed methods design was to investigate the effects Quintero&rsquo;s Intervention Paragon (QIP) has on secondary students with mild to moderate disabilities and their academic achievement. This study focused on implementing an intervention model -- Quintero&rsquo;s Intervention Paragon -- to determine academic outcomes for secondary students with mild to moderate disabilities. The intervention includes explicit instruction, a cooperative learning technique, technology integration and parent involvement. Students with mild to moderate disabilities were required to meet the same expectations as their nondisabled peers. Students with mild to moderate disabilities -- eligible under IDEA -- must be challenged to excel within the general curriculum and be prepared to succeed in their post-school lives, including college and careers. The study was conducted at ABC Middle School located in Los Angeles County in Southern California. The study used two types of quantitative instruments: (1) surveys of parents and students and (2) pre and post assessments in reading. There were paired t-tests and descriptive statistics to analyze the tests. Results indicated that students made academic engagement growth with intervention. They also increased their self-regulation skills. Analysis of data collected indicated that participants had positive perspectives about the intervention. Contributions to the literature and implications of the findings are discussed as well as limitations for future research.</p>
33

Factors that Build and Sustain a Relationship of Trust between School District Superintendents and Principals

Kellogg, Donna 05 May 2017 (has links)
<p> <b>Purpose:</b> The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the factors that facilitate the building and sustaining of a trusting relationship between experienced superintendents and principals. An additional purpose of this study was to determine what similarities and differences exist between superintendents and principals perceptions of the factors that build and sustain a trusting relationship. </p><p> <b>Methodology:</b> This was a qualitative phenomenological comparative design to first determine the lived experiences of sixteen total participants, eight superintendents and eight principals from both San Bernardino and Riverside Counties. Face-to-Face interviews were conducted and responses from the total of 16 questions were coded to analyze. </p><p> <b>Findings:</b> The findings of this study included identifying the factors and actions that superintendents take to build and sustain a trusting relationship with principals. Based upon this study the results indicated that there were a number of factors that affected and influenced the maintenance and sustainability of trust. Including but not limited to, open communication, building trust, extension of trust and building relationships. </p><p> <b>Conclusion:</b> Open, honest, transparent communication in the form of various modalities that enabled the building and maintaining of trust were the most important factors in the establishing and sustaining of a relationship of trust between school district superintendents and principals. A wide variety of communication skills are critical, especially for the superintendent, for the health of the relationship between the principals and superintendents. </p><p> <b>Recommendations:</b> Further research is advised: Descriptive studies of the identified factors that establish and maintain trust should be replicated with a larger set of data with the goal of impacting the current programs used to train those in leadership positions. Further recommendations include continued research on trust relationships in educational relationships: principals/teachers, teachers/students, county superintendents/district superintendents and superintendents/school boards. ABSTRACT Factors that Build and Sustain a Relationship of Trust Between School District Superintendents and Principals by Donna Kellogg Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the factors that facilitate the building and sustaining of a trusting relationship between experienced superintendents and principals. An additional purpose of this study was to determine what similarities and differences exist between superintendents and principals perceptions of the factors that build and sustain a trusting relationship. Methodology: This was a qualitative phenomenological comparative design to first determine the lived experiences of sixteen total participants, eight superintendents and eight principals from both San Bernardino and Riverside Counties. Face-to-Face interviews were conducted and responses from the total of 16 questions were coded to analyze. Findings: The findings of this study included identifying the factors and actions that superintendents take to build and sustain a trusting relationship with principals. Based upon this study the results indicated that there were a number of factors that affected and influenced the maintenance and sustainability of trust. Including but not limited to, open communication, building trust, extension of trust and building relationships. Conclusion: Open, honest, transparent communication in the form of various modalities that enabled the building and maintaining of trust were the most important factors in the establishing and sustaining of a relationship of trust between school district superintendents and principals. A wide variety of communication skills are critical, especially for the superintendent, for the health of the relationship between the principals and superintendents. Recommendations: Further research is advised: Descriptive studies of the identified factors that establish and maintain trust should be replicated with a larger set of data with the goal of impacting the current programs used to train those in leadership positions. Further recommendations include continued research on trust relationships in educational relationships: principals/teachers, teachers/students, county superintendents/district superintendents and superintendents/school boards. ABSTRACT Factors that Build and Sustain a Relationship of Trust Between School District Superintendents and Principals by Donna Kellogg Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the factors that facilitate the building and sustaining of a trusting relationship between experienced superintendents and principals. An additional purpose of this study was to determine what similarities and differences exist between superintendents and principals perceptions of the factors that build and sustain a trusting relationship. Methodology: This was a qualitative phenomenological comparative design to first determine the lived experiences of sixteen total participants, eight superintendents and eight principals from both San Bernardino and Riverside Counties. Face-to-Face interviews were conducted and responses from the total of 16 questions were coded to analyze. Findings: The findings of this study included identifying the factors and actions that superintendents take to build and sustain a trusting relationship with principals. Based upon this study the results indicated that there were a number of factors that affected and influenced the maintenance and sustainability of trust. Including but not limited to, open communication, building trust, extension of trust and building relationships. Conclusion: Open, honest, transparent communication in the form of various modalities that enabled the building and maintaining of trust were the most important factors in the establishing and sustaining of a relationship of trust between school district superintendents and principals. A wide variety of communication skills are critical, especially for the superintendent, for the health of the relationship between the principals and superintendents. Recommendations: Further research is advised: Descriptive studies of the identified factors that establish and maintain trust should be replicated with a larger set of data with the goal of impacting the current programs used to train those in leadership positions. Further recommendations include continued research on trust relationships in educational relationships: principals/teachers, teachers/students, county superintendents/district superintendents and superintendents/school boards. ABSTRACT Factors that Build and Sustain a Relationship of Trust Between School District Superintendents and Principals by Donna Kellogg Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the factors that facilitate the building and sustaining of a trusting relationship between experienced superintendents and principals. An additional purpose of this study was to determine what similarities and differences exist between superintendents and principals perceptions of the factors that build and sustain a trusting relationship. Methodology: This was a qualitative phenomenological comparative design to first determine the lived experiences of sixteen total participants, eight superintendents and eight principals from both San Bernardino and Riverside Counties. Face-to-Face interviews were conducted and responses from the total of 16 questions were coded to analyze. Findings: The findings of this study included identifying the factors and actions that superintendents take to build and sustain a trusting relationship with principals. Based upon this study the results indicated that there were a number of factors that affected and influenced the maintenance and sustainability of trust. Including but not limited to, open communication, building trust, extension of trust and building relationships. Conclusion: Open, honest, transparent communication in the form of various modalities that enabled the building and maintaining of trust were the most important factors in the establishing and sustaining of a relationship of trust between school district superintendents and principals. A wide variety of communication skills are critical, especially for the superintendent, for the health of the relationship between the principals and superintendents. Recommendations: Further research is advised: Descriptive studies of the identified factors that establish and maintain trust should be replicated with a larger set of data with the goal of impacting the current programs used to train those in leadership positions. Further recommendations include continued research on trust relationships in educational relationships: principals/teachers, teachers/students, county superintendents/district superintendents and superintendents/school boards.</p>
34

Superintendents' and Principals' Perceptions of Using Social Media to Develop a Brand Presence in a Small Northeast State

L?Etoile, Nicole 11 May 2017 (has links)
<p>Social media has shifted the landscape and broadened the concept of educational branding. Developing a BrandED mindset and strategy in the digital age is necessary in today?s educational climate (Sheninger, 2015). Social media tools provide school leaders with opportunities to share successes on a frequent basis with stakeholders. This immediate sharing of successes could be a powerful tool for schools to proactively shape their public image (Scott, 2011). This mixed methods study explored experiences of public school superintendents and principals using social media to communicate with stakeholders as a component of their communications and public relations strategy to establish a brand presence. The research questions were: 1. To what extent do superintendents and principals use social media tools to communicate with employees, students, parents, and community members? 2. Is there a significant difference between superintendents and principals with respect to the use of social media tools among the following groups: employees, students, parents, and community members? 3. Is there a significant difference between superintendents and principals with respect to the branding strategies they include in their use of social media tools? 4. Is there a relationship between the use of social media tools and following demographics: gender, years of experience, level, urban/suburban rural? 5. How do superintendents (n=4) describe experiences using social media tools to communicate as a component of their communications and public relations strategy to establish a brand presence? 6. How do principals (n=5) describe experiences using social media tools to communicate as a component of their communications and public relations strategy to establish a brand presence? The quantitative instrument was administered to State Superintendents (N=14) and Principals (N=78). Significant differences were found between superintendents? and principals? branding strategies when using Facebook; using blogs with students between urban and suburban school leaders; using Twitter between elementary principals compared to middle and high school principals; and using Facebook between elementary and high school principals. The qualitative findings revealed nine themes between superintendents (n=4) and principals (n=5). The results from this study may provide guidance to school leaders developing a social media public relations strategy to establish a brand presence
35

A Phenomenological Study of Teacher Leadership Experiences in Wisconsin PK-12 Public Schools| 2011-2016

Pfaff, Betty J. 03 June 2017 (has links)
<p> This study, &ldquo;A Phenomenological Study of Teacher Leadership Experiences in Wisconsin PK-12 Public Schools: 2011-2016,&rdquo; explored teacher leadership experiences during a time of extraordinary change. Throughout the time period specified, Wisconsin teachers dealt with Act 10 legislation that ended collective bargaining, large-scale teacher retirements, common core induced curriculum overhauls, and unprecedented education budget cuts. This research study looked at teacher leaders&rsquo; experiences during this unique time-frame. Given that this area of research is new, a phenomenological methodology was selected because it looks at lived experiences. To conduct this research, semi-structured interviews were completed with twelve teacher leaders who were nominated as teacher leaders by their administrators.</p>
36

Exploring Student Engagement and Middle-School Students' Perceptions of Humor Used As a Teaching Tool

Gingold Seaman, Linda 08 June 2017 (has links)
<p> As students progress from elementary to high school grades, academic disengagement becomes increasingly evident. In studies with college-aged students, humor has been effectively utilized as a tool in the classroom to stimulate engagement and enhance the learning of class material. The purpose of this qualitative single-case study was to explore the extent to which humor could be used as a viable teaching tool in the middle school classroom to increase student engagement. The research question focused on the perspectives of 10 middle-school students on the use of humor in an eighth-grade English class, in a suburban community in the Capital Region of New York State. Data collection methods included interviews using semi-structured questions and follow-up probes, based on an existing survey protocol by Makewa, Role, and Genga (2011), observations, and student daily journal entries. Eight themes emerged, including two that could not be triangulated. The following themes emerged: teacher chosen humorous media used as a tool for instruction; humor used as a tool to convey content knowledge; humor as a tool for redirection; subjective nature of humor; jokes as an instructional tool; humorous stories used as an instructional tool; humor appropriate for middle-school students; and the effect of humor on learning. Literature from previous studies on the benefits of humor in the classroom supported the findings in this study. Data analyses revealed that middle-school students perceived humor as a viable instructional tool that had positive effects on their academic engagement, including increases in the desire to be present in class, attentiveness to tasks, motivation, understanding and recall of concepts; decreases in boredom were also noted. Recommendations for future application included professional development on the use of humor in the classroom. Future research should include study in other grade levels and with a diverse range of student populations to better generalize the findings of this study.</p>
37

Virginia's Instructional Technology Resource Teacher Program: Ten Years Later, What We Know, -Where Do We Need to Go?

Hodge, Cherise A. 01 January 2017 (has links)
VIRGINIA’S INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY RESOURCE TEACHER PROGRAM: TEN YEARS LATER, WHAT WE KNOW, WHERE DO WE NEED TO GO? By Cherise Ann Hodge, PhD A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Virginia Commonwealth University. Virginia Commonwealth University, 2017 Director: Dr. Whitney Newcomb, Professor, Educational Leadership In 2004, Virginia’s Department of Education (VDOE) identified the need for technology integration in instruction to meet the needs of the 21st century student. For this to happen effectively, Virginia legislators authorized and funded an instructional position, the Instructional Technology Resource Teacher (ITRT), for each 1000 students in Virginia’s 132 school divisions (Virginia Standards of Quality [SOQ], 2004). The VDOE established guidelines for this position to direct school division implementation. Primary responsibilities for the position involve activities relating to teacher professional development. Virginia divisions chose varying models for deploying the ITRT to meet this requirement. In 2012, the legislature edited the directive for the position to give localities the option to use the position as an ITRT, as a data coordinator, or as both positions (Virginia Standards of Quality, 2012). This study uses survey data to determine how ITRTs are spending their time, ten years after the implementation of the program. Survey data was compared to data collected by Hooker (2006) and the guidelines for the position as published by the Virginia Department of Education (Virginia Department of Education [VDOE], 2008). Major findings indicate that ITRTs are still spending time on tasks that are not specified in the published guidelines. This study’s data correlate with the data gathered by Hooker (2006) following the first year of the implementation of the SOQ.
38

Online Learning| Allowing Students to Learn Non-Traditionally

Waldron, Keali Clark 02 May 2017 (has links)
<p> It was not known if and how online teaching modalities influenced student achievement relative to traditional classrooms in the State of Louisiana in the context of curriculum changes moving from Pathways to Common Core Standards. The purpose of this qualitative, descriptive case study was to explore teacher perceptions regarding how, and if, the type of learning environment and transition to new educational accountability standards influenced high school student achievement for Algebra I and geometry. Gardner&rsquo;s theory of multiple intelligences and McClelland&rsquo;s achievement motivation theory guided the study. Five teachers that instructed students in a traditional classroom and five teachers that instructed students in an online classroom completed open-ended questionnaires followed by telephone interviews. Data were analyzed with NVivo Software, the five major themes that were related to the research questions and discussed with the study were: teaching challenges, student issues, resource issues, educational settings, and curriculum transition. These themes were consistent with the current practices of Common Core Standards (CCS) and with proposed future beliefs of CCS implementations. Implications for future research suggest comparing EOC scores directly, examining other state scores, other subject areas within the EOCs, and what kind of learners succeed more readily in online schools and why.</p>
39

Meaning Makers| A Mixed-Method Case Study of Exemplary Police Chiefs and the Behaviors They Use to Create Personal and Organizational Meaning

Villanueva, Rose Nicole 03 May 2017 (has links)
<p> The purpose of this thematic, mixed-method case study was to identify and describe the behaviors that exemplary police chiefs use to create personal and organizational meaning for themselves and their followers through character, vision, relationships, wisdom, and inspiration. Additionally, this study surveyed the followers of these exemplary leaders to evaluate the degree of importance to which these followers believe a leader uses character, vision, relationships, wisdom, and inspiration to create personal and organizational meaning. Police chiefs were interviewed for this study regarding their insight in the use of the behaviors associated with character, vision, relationships, wisdom, and inspiration. There have been studies that have focused on character, vision, relationships, wisdom, and inspiration. However, there has not been a study that has included all five variables in the research that identify and describe behaviors that exemplary leaders use to create personal and organizational meaning. The literature and the findings support use of the five variables in the behaviors that create meaning. The findings of this research show that exemplary leaders use all five variables throughout their leadership. Additionally, exemplary police chiefs agree that all five variables are needed, and one variable does not offset the others. Their followers also concur that the five variables are important exemplary leadership behaviors that help create personal and organizational meaning. Further research is recommended for this area of study by replicating this study in other law enforcement agencies focusing on either elected sheriffs, school district police, or special district police chiefs. In addition, a limited case study is recommended, locating three female police chiefs and looking at their pathways to the chief position. By identifying and describing the behaviors that exemplary police chiefs use to create personal and organizational meaning for themselves and their followers and the degree of importance which followers perceive the behaviors through character, vision, relationships, wisdom, and inspiration, help to create personal and organizational meaning, researchers can provide the necessary strategies and tools for improving these five variables in leaders in order to create successful and meaning leadership.</p>
40

Cultural Capital and Student Engagement| Examining the Differences Between Culturally Relevant Curriculum and Traditional Instruction in an Elementary School Setting

Duran, Angela 15 September 2016 (has links)
<p> This dissertation begins using Pierre Bourdieu (1979b), Gloria Ladson-Billings (2009), and Jean Anyon (1980) as a theoretical framework to examine how culturally relevant curriculum influences student engagement. This qualitative study utilized narrative inquiry to examine the effect of culturally relevant curriculum and student engagement. Four research questions were used in interviews of students, parents, teachers, and administrators, and were as follows: To what extent does culturally relevant literature influence student engagement with academic material in fourth grade? What common themes related to culturally relevant curriculum emerge when observing and listening to authentic voices of parents and fourth graders? Based on research findings of this study, what curricular and instructional recommendations can be made related to the influence of culturally relevant curriculum on student engagement in fourth grade? Does culturally relevant literature engage students more than traditional curriculum in a fourth- grade classroom? Social and cultural capital is demonstrated through all three themes of school culture, curriculum, and instruction. Used as a tool to guide pedagogy, teachers and administrators were able to form trusting relationships allowing for more behavioral and affective student engagement. Using authentic voices from the 14 interviews, two themes emerged from school culture, including relationships and identity; three themes emerged from curriculum, including making connections, human resources, and physical resources; and three themes emerged from instruction, including communication, support, and interactive environments.</p>

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