• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 2
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 3
  • 3
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Der Einfluss von Lebensstilen auf den Energieverbrauch in privaten Haushalten im Bereich Wohnen am Beispiel der Stadt Stuttgart / The influence of lifestyle on residential energy consumption – a case study of the city of Stuttgart

Linder, Susanne January 2008 (has links) (PDF)
Aufgrund der weltweit steigenden Energienachfrage und den gleichzeitig knapper werdenden natürlichen Ressourcen, muss Energie in Zukunft effizienter genutzt werden. Auch im Sektor der privaten Haushalte stellt sich deshalb die Frage, von welchen Faktoren der Energieverbrauch abhängt. Der Einfluss von technischen Faktoren wie Wärmedämmung von Gebäuden oder der Effizienzklasse von elektrischen Geräten auf den Heizenergie- bzw. Stromverbrauch in privaten Haushalten ist bereits bekannt. Interessant zu wissen ist jedoch auch, welchen Einfluss unterschiedliche Eigenschaften und Verhaltensweisen der Bewohner und damit welchen Einfluss der Lebensstil auf den Energieverbrauch hat. Um den Einfluss des Lebensstils auf den Energieverbrauch in privaten Haushalten im Bereich Wohnen zu untersuchen, wurden Daten anhand einer schriftlichen Haushaltsbefragung in ausgewählten Stadtvierteln in Stuttgart erhoben. Bei der Befragung kam ein bereichsspezifischer Lebensstilansatz zur Anwendung d.h. es wurden Fragen zu den einzelnen Lebensstilbereichen „Lebensform“, „Sozialstruktur“, „Energiesparverhalten“ und „Umwelt- und Energiebewusstsein“ gestellt. Anhand ausgewählter Variablen dieser Lebensstilbereiche wurden die Haushalte mit Hilfe der Clusteranalyse in Lebensstilgruppen des Strom- und Heizenergieverbrauchs eingeteilt. Ein Vergleich der Lebensstilgruppen des Stromverbrauchs zeigte, dass der Unterschied im Stromverbrauch v.a. durch die Anzahl der Personen im Haushalt bedingt ist. Die anderen Lebensstilbereiche wirken sich zwar auch auf den Stromverbrauch aus, sie rufen jedoch nur zwischen wenigen Gruppen signifikante Unterschiede im Stromverbrauch hervor. Bei den Lebensstilgruppen des Heizenergieverbrauchs zeichnet sich ein Einfluss des Lebensstilbereichs des „Energiesparverhaltens“ auf den Heizenergieverbrauch ab. Aufgrund der geringen Fallzahlen konnten die Unterschiede im Heizenergieverbrauch zwischen den Gruppen jedoch nicht auf Signifikanz getestet werden. Aus den Ergebnissen der Untersuchung wird deutlich, dass der Lebensstil einen Einfluss auf den Energieverbrauch in privaten Haushalten im Bereich Wohnen hat. Eine Einteilung der Haushalte in Lebensstilgruppen könnte somit Ansatzpunkte für ein Lebensstil-spezifisches Energiesparmarketing bieten. Um den Einfluss des Lebensstils auf den Energieverbrauch tiefergehend zu untersuchen, sollte der Einfluss von technischen Faktoren ganz ausgeschlossen und die einzelnen Lebensstilbereiche (v.a. das Energiesparverhalten) in den Analysen mit mehr Variablen berücksichtigt werden. / Due to the increasing energy consumption and the growing scarcity of fossil fuels, energy efficiency is a crucial issue. Private households account for 30% of the energy consumption in Germany and thus, the question arises how to reduce the energy demand in this sector. Influences of technical factors like insulation of buildings, or the energy efficiency class of electrical appliances on the energy demand are already well known. However, little information exists on the influence of lifestyle on the energy demand that is the characteristics and the energy behaviour of households. In order to analyse the influence of lifestyle on energy demand in residences, a survey was conducted in selected urban districts of the city of Stuttgart, Germany. In the lifestyle analysis, the domains “household type”, “social structure”, “energy saving behaviour” and “environmental awareness” were targeted. Based on selected variables of these domains and a cluster analysis, the households were classified into different lifestyle groups of electricity and heat energy demand. The results show that variations in electricity consumption in the lifestyle groups are mainly caused by differences in the number of household members. The other lifestyle domains also affect the electricity demand; however, no significant differences between the individual lifestyle groups can be identified. The lifestyle groups of heat energy consumption display differences in the energy saving behaviour. However, due to the small sample size, significance tests could not be applied. The results demonstrate that lifestyle has a measurable influence on the residential energy consumption. Thus, marketing campaigns for energy saving should be based on lifestyle specific concepts to improve their success. Future research should try to fully exclude the influence of technical factors on the energy demand to be able to further determine the influence of the individual lifestyle domains.
2

Measuring, Rating, and Predicting the Energy Efficiency of Servers / Messung, Bewertung und Vorhersage von Serverenergieeffizienz

von Kistowski, Jóakim Gunnarsson January 2019 (has links) (PDF)
Energy efficiency of computing systems has become an increasingly important issue over the last decades. In 2015, data centers were responsible for 2% of the world's greenhouse gas emissions, which is roughly the same as the amount produced by air travel. In addition to these environmental concerns, power consumption of servers in data centers results in significant operating costs, which increase by at least 10% each year. To address this challenge, the U.S. EPA and other government agencies are considering the use of novel measurement methods in order to label the energy efficiency of servers. The energy efficiency and power consumption of a server is subject to a great number of factors, including, but not limited to, hardware, software stack, workload, and load level. This huge number of influencing factors makes measuring and rating of energy efficiency challenging. It also makes it difficult to find an energy-efficient server for a specific use-case. Among others, server provisioners, operators, and regulators would profit from information on the servers in question and on the factors that affect those servers' power consumption and efficiency. However, we see a lack of measurement methods and metrics for energy efficiency of the systems under consideration. Even assuming that a measurement methodology existed, making decisions based on its results would be challenging. Power prediction methods that make use of these results would aid in decision making. They would enable potential server customers to make better purchasing decisions and help operators predict the effects of potential reconfigurations. Existing energy efficiency benchmarks cannot fully address these challenges, as they only measure single applications at limited sets of load levels. In addition, existing efficiency metrics are not helpful in this context, as they are usually a variation of the simple performance per power ratio, which is only applicable to single workloads at a single load level. Existing data center efficiency metrics, on the other hand, express the efficiency of the data center space and power infrastructure, not focusing on the efficiency of the servers themselves. Power prediction methods for not-yet-available systems that could make use of the results provided by a comprehensive power rating methodology are also lacking. Existing power prediction models for hardware designers have a very fine level of granularity and detail that would not be useful for data center operators. This thesis presents a measurement and rating methodology for energy efficiency of servers and an energy efficiency metric to be applied to the results of this methodology. We also design workloads, load intensity and distribution models, and mechanisms that can be used for energy efficiency testing. Based on this, we present power prediction mechanisms and models that utilize our measurement methodology and its results for power prediction. Specifically, the six major contributions of this thesis are: We present a measurement methodology and metrics for energy efficiency rating of servers that use multiple, specifically chosen workloads at different load levels for a full system characterization. We evaluate the methodology and metric with regard to their reproducibility, fairness, and relevance. We investigate the power and performance variations of test results and show fairness of the metric through a mathematical proof and a correlation analysis on a set of 385 servers. We evaluate the metric's relevance by showing the relationships that can be established between metric results and third-party applications. We create models and extraction mechanisms for load profiles that vary over time, as well as load distribution mechanisms and policies. The models are designed to be used to define arbitrary dynamic load intensity profiles that can be leveraged for benchmarking purposes. The load distribution mechanisms place workloads on computing resources in a hierarchical manner. Our load intensity models can be extracted in less than 0.2 seconds and our resulting models feature a median modeling error of 12.7% on average. In addition, our new load distribution strategy can save up to 10.7% of power consumption on a single server node. We introduce an approach to create small-scale workloads that emulate the power consumption-relevant behavior of large-scale workloads by approximating their CPU performance counter profile, and we introduce TeaStore, a distributed, micro-service-based reference application. TeaStore can be used to evaluate power and performance model accuracy, elasticity of cloud auto-scalers, and the effectiveness of power saving mechanisms for distributed systems. We show that we are capable of emulating the power consumption behavior of realistic workloads with a mean deviation less than 10% and down to 0.2 watts (1%). We demonstrate the use of TeaStore in the context of performance model extraction and cloud auto-scaling also showing that it may generate workloads with different effects on the power consumption of the system under consideration. We present a method for automated selection of interpolation strategies for performance and power characterization. We also introduce a configuration approach for polynomial interpolation functions of varying degrees that improves prediction accuracy for system power consumption for a given system utilization. We show that, in comparison to regression, our automated interpolation method selection and configuration approach improves modeling accuracy by 43.6% if additional reference data is available and by 31.4% if it is not. We present an approach for explicit modeling of the impact a virtualized environment has on power consumption and a method to predict the power consumption of a software application. Both methods use results produced by our measurement methodology to predict the respective power consumption for servers that are otherwise not available to the person making the prediction. Our methods are able to predict power consumption reliably for multiple hypervisor configurations and for the target application workloads. Application workload power prediction features a mean average absolute percentage error of 9.5%. Finally, we propose an end-to-end modeling approach for predicting the power consumption of component placements at run-time. The model can also be used to predict the power consumption at load levels that have not yet been observed on the running system. We show that we can predict the power consumption of two different distributed web applications with a mean absolute percentage error of 2.2%. In addition, we can predict the power consumption of a system at a previously unobserved load level and component distribution with an error of 1.2%. The contributions of this thesis already show a significant impact in science and industry. The presented efficiency rating methodology, including its metric, have been adopted by the U.S. EPA in the latest version of the ENERGY STAR Computer Server program. They are also being considered by additional regulatory agencies, including the EU Commission and the China National Institute of Standardization. In addition, the methodology's implementation and the underlying methodology itself have already found use in several research publications. Regarding future work, we see a need for new workloads targeting specialized server hardware. At the moment, we are witnessing a shift in execution hardware to specialized machine learning chips, general purpose GPU computing, FPGAs being embedded into compute servers, etc. To ensure that our measurement methodology remains relevant, workloads covering these areas are required. Similarly, power prediction models must be extended to cover these new scenarios. / In den vergangenen Jahrzehnten hat die Energieeffizienz von Computersystemen stark an Bedeutung gewonnen. Bereits 2015 waren Rechenzentren für 2% der weltweiten Treibhausgasemissionen verantwortlich, was mit der durch den Flugverkehr verursachten Treibhausgasmenge vergleichbar ist. Dabei wirkt sich der Stromverbrauch von Rechenzentren nicht nur auf die Umwelt aus, sondern verursacht auch erhebliche, jährlich um mindestens 10% steigende, Betriebskosten. Um sich diesen Herausforderungen zu stellen, erwägen die U.S. EPA und andere Behörden die Anwendung von neuartigen Messmethoden, um die Energieeffizienz von Servern zu bestimmen und zu zertifizieren. Die Energieeffizienz und der Stromverbrauch eines Servers wird von vielen verschiedenen Faktoren, u.a. der Hardware, der zugrundeliegenden Ausführungssoftware, der Arbeitslast und der Lastintensität, beeinflusst. Diese große Menge an Einflussfaktoren führt dazu, dass die Messung und Bewertung der Energieeffizienz herausfordernd ist, was die Auswahl von energieeffizienten Servern für konkrete Anwendungsfälle erheblich erschwert. Informationen über Server und ihre Energieeffizienz bzw. ihren Stromverbrauch beeinflussenden Faktoren wären für potentielle Kunden von Serverhardware, Serverbetreiber und Umweltbehörden von großem Nutzen. Im Allgemeinen mangelt es aber an Messmethoden und Metriken, welche die Energieeffizienz von Servern in befriedigendem Maße erfassen und bewerten können. Allerdings wäre es selbst unter der Annahme, dass es solche Messmethoden gäbe, dennoch schwierig Entscheidungen auf Basis ihrer Ergebnisse zu fällen. Um derartige Entscheidungen zu vereinfachen, wären Methoden zur Stromverbrauchsvorhersage hilfreich, um es potentiellen Serverkunden zu ermöglichen bessere Kaufentscheidungen zu treffen und Serverbetreibern zu helfen, die Auswirkungen möglicher Rekonfigurationen vorherzusagen. Existierende Energieeffizienzbenchmarks können diesen Herausforderungen nicht vollständig begegnen, da sie nur einzelne Anwendungen bei wenigen Lastintensitätsstufen ausmessen. Auch sind die vorhandenen Energieeffizienzmetriken in diesem Kontext nicht hilfreich, da sie normalerweise nur eine Variation des einfachen Verhältnisses von Performanz zu Stromverbrauch darstellen, welches nur auf einzelne Arbeitslasten bei einer einzigen gemessenen Lastintensität angewandt werden kann. Im Gegensatz dazu beschreiben die existierenden Rechenzentrumseffizienzmetriken lediglich die Platz- und Strominfrastruktureffizienz von Rechenzentren und bewerten nicht die Effizienz der Server als solche. Methoden zur Stromverbrauchsvorhersage noch nicht für Kunden verfügbarer Server, welche die Ergebnisse einer ausführlichen Stromverbrauchsmessungs- und Bewertungsmethodologie verwenden, gibt es ebenfalls nicht. Stattdessen existieren Stromverbrauchsvorhersagemethoden und Modelle für Hardwaredesigner und Hersteller. Diese Methoden sind jedoch sehr feingranular und erfordern Details, welche für Rechenzentrumsbetreiber nicht verfügbar sind, sodass diese keine Vorhersage durchführen können. In dieser Arbeit werden eine Energieeffizienzmess- und Bewertungsmethodologie für Server und Energieeffizienzmetriken für diese Methodologie vorgestellt. Es werden Arbeitslasten, Lastintensitäten und Lastverteilungsmodelle und -mechanismen, die für Energieeffizienzmessungen und Tests verwendet werden können, entworfen. Darauf aufbauend werden Mechanismen und Modelle zur Stromverbrauchsvorhersage präsentiert, welche diese Messmethodologie und die damit produzierten Ergebnisse verwenden. Die sechs Hauptbeiträge dieser Arbeit sind: Eine Messmethodologie und Metriken zur Energieeffizienzbewertung von Servern, die mehrere, verschiedene Arbeitslasten unter verschiedenen Lastintensitäten ausführt, um die beobachteten Systeme vollständig zu charakterisieren. Diese Methodologie wird im Bezug auf ihre Wiederholbarkeit, Fairness und Relevanz evaluiert. Es werden die Stromverbrauchs- und Performanzvariationen von wiederholten Methodologieausführungen untersucht und die Fairness der Methodologie wird durch mathematische Beweise und durch eine Korrelationsanalyse anhand von Messungen auf 385 Servern bewertet. Die Relevanz der Methodologie und der Metrik wird gezeigt, indem Beziehungen zwischen Metrikergebnissen und der Energieeffizienz von anderen Serverapplikationen untersucht werden. Modelle und Extraktionsverfahren für sich mit der Zeit verändernde Lastprofile, sowie Lastverteilungsmechanismen und -regeln. Die Modelle können dazu verwendet werden, beliebige Lastintensitätsprofile, die zum Benchmarking verwendet werden können, zu entwerfen. Die Lastverteilungsmechanismen, hingegen, platzieren Arbeitslasten in hierarchischer Weise auf Rechenressourcen. Die Lastintensitätsmodelle können in weniger als 0,2 Sekunden extrahiert werden, wobei die jeweils resultierenden Modelle einen durchschnittlichen Medianmodellierungsfehler von 12,7% aufweisen. Zusätzlich dazu kann die neue Lastverteilungsstrategie auf einzelnen Servern zu Stromverbrauchseinsparungen von bis zu 10,7% führen. Ein Ansatz um kleine Arbeitslasten zu erzeugen, welche das Stromverbrauchsverhalten von größeren, komplexeren Lasten emulieren, indem sie ihre CPU Performance Counter-Profile approximieren sowie den TeaStore: Eine verteilte, auf dem Micro-Service-Paradigma basierende Referenzapplikation. Der TeaStore kann verwendet werden, um Strom- und Performanzmodellgenauigkeit, Elastizität von Cloud Autoscalern und die Effektivität von Stromsparmechanismen in verteilten Systemen zu untersuchen. Das Arbeitslasterstellungsverfahren kann das Stromverbrauchsverhalten von realistischen Lasten mit einer mittleren Abweichung von weniger als 10% und bis zu einem minimalen Fehler von 0,2 Watt (1%) nachahmen. Die Anwendung des TeaStores wird durch die Extraktion von Performanzmodellen, die Anwendung in einer automatisch skalierenden Cloudumgebung und durch eine Demonstration der verschiedenen möglichen Stromverbräuche, die er auf Servern verursachen kann, gezeigt. Eine Methode zur automatisierten Auswahl von Interpolationsstrategien im Bezug auf Performanz und Stromverbrauchscharakterisierung. Diese Methode wird durch einen Konfigurationsansatz, der die Genauigkeit der auslastungsabhängigen Stromvorhersagen von polynomiellen Interpolationsfunktionen verbessert, erweitert. Im Gegensatz zur Regression kann der automatisierte Interpolationsmethodenauswahl- und Konfigurationsansatz die Modellierungsgenauigkeit mit Hilfe eines Referenzdatensatzes um 43,6% verbessern und kann selbst ohne diesen Referenzdatensatz eine Verbesserung von 31,4% erreichen. Einen Ansatz, der explizit den Einfluss von Virtualisierungsumgebungen auf den Stromverbrauch modelliert und eine Methode zur Vorhersage des Stromverbrauches von Softwareapplikationen. Beide Verfahren nutzen die von der in dieser Arbeit vorgegestellten Stromverbrauchsmessmethologie erzeugten Ergebnisse, um den jeweiligen Stromverbrauch von Servern, die den Vorhersagenden sonst nicht zur Verfügung stehen, zu ermöglichen. Die vorgestellten Verfahren können den Stromverbrauch für verschiedene Hypervisorkonfigurationen und für Applikationslasten zuverlässig vorhersagen. Die Vorhersage des Stromverbrauchs von Serverapplikationen erreicht einen mittleren absoluten Prozentfehler von 9,5%. Ein Modellierungsansatz zur Stromverbrauchsvorhersage für Laufzeitplatzierungsentscheidungen von Softwarekomponenten, welcher auch dazu verwendet werden kann den Stromverbrauch für bisher nicht beobachtete Lastintensitäten auf dem laufenden System vorherzusagen. Der Modellierungsansatz kann den Stromverbrauch von zwei verschiedenen, verteilten Webanwendungen mit einem mittleren absoluten Prozentfehler von 2,2% vorhersagen. Zusätzlich kann er den Stromverbrauch von einem System bei einer in der Vergangenheit nicht beobachteten Lastintensität und Komponentenverteilung mit einem Fehler von 1,2% vorhersagen. Die Beiträge in dieser Arbeit haben sich bereits signifikant auf Wissenschaft und Industrie ausgewirkt. Die präsentierte Energieeffizienzbewertungsmethodologie, inklusive ihrer Metriken, ist von der U.S. EPA in die neueste Version des ENERGY STAR Computer Server-Programms aufgenommen worden und wird zurzeit außerdem von weiteren Behörden, darunter die EU Kommission und die Nationale Chinesische Standardisierungsbehörde, in Erwägung gezogen. Zusätzlich haben die Implementierung der Methodologie und die zugrundeliegende Methodologie bereits Anwendung in mehreren wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten gefunden. In Zukunft werden im Rahmen von weiterführenden Arbeiten neue Arbeitslasten erstellt werden müssen, um die Energieeffizienz von spezialisierter Hardware zu untersuchen. Zurzeit verändert sich die Server-Rechenlandschaft in der Hinsicht, dass spezialisierte Ausführungseinheiten, wie Chips zum maschinellen Lernen, GPGPU Rechenchips und FPGAs in Servern verbaut werden. Um sicherzustellen, dass die Messmethodologie aus dieser Arbeit weiterhin relevant bleibt, wird es nötig sein, Arbeitslasten zu erstellen, welche diese Fälle abdecken, sowie Stromverbrauchsmodelle zu entwerfen, die in der Lage sind, derartige spezialisierte Hardware zu betrachten.
3

Wake-up Receiver for Ultra-low Power Wireless Sensor Networks

Bdiri, Sadok 05 July 2021 (has links)
In ultra-low power Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) sensor nodes need to interact, depending on the application, even at a rapid pace while preserving battery life. Wireless communication brings thereby quite the burden as the radio transceiver requires a relative huge amount of power during both transmission or reception phases. In WSNs with on demand communication, the sensor nodes are required to maintain responsiveness and to act the sooner they receive a request, reducing the overall latency of the network. The aspect is more challenging in asynchronous WSN as the receiver possesses no information about the packet arrival time. In a purely on-demand communication, duty-cycling shows little to almost no improvement. The receiving node, in such scheme, is expected to last for years while also being accessible to other peers. Here arises the utility of an external ultra-low power radio receiver known as Wake-up Receiver (WuRx). Its essential task is to remain as the only part of the system running while the rest of the systems enters the lowest power mode (i.e., sleep state). Once a request signal is received, it notifies the host processor and other peripherals for an incoming communication. With the sensor node being in sleep state (WuRx active only), substantial power levels can be achieved. If the WuRx is able to interact rapidly, the added latency remains negligible. As crucial performance figures, the sensitivity and bit rate are immediately affected by the extreme low-power budget at diifferent magnitudes, depending mainly on the incorporated architecture. This thesis focuses on the design of a feature-balanced WuRx. The passive radio frequency architecture (PRF) relies on passive detection while consuming zero power to extract On-Off-Keying (OOK) modulated envelopes. The featured sensitivity, however, is reduced compared to more complex architectures. A WuRx based on PRF architecture can effectively enable short-range applications. The sensitivity can vary with respect to several parameters including the total generated noise, circuit technology and topology. Two variants of the PRF WuRxs are introduced with the baseband amplifier being the main change. The first revision employs a high performance amplifier with reduced average energy consumption, thanks to a novel power gating control. The second variant focuses on employing an ultra-low power baseband amplifier as it is expected to be in a continuous active state. This thesis also brings the necessary analysis on the passive front-end with the intention to enhance the overall WuRx sensitivity. Proof of concepts are embedded in sensor node boards and feature -61 dBm and -64 dBm of sensitivity for the first and the second variant, respectively, at a packet-error-rate (PER) of 1% whilst demanding a similar power of 7.2 µW during packet listening. During packet decoding, the first variant demands a 150 µW of power, caused greatly by the baseband amplifier. The achieved latency is less than 30 ms and the bit rate is 4 kbit/s, Manchester encoding. For long-range applications, a higher sensitivityWuRx is proposed based on Tuned-RF (TRF) architecture. By embedding a low-noise amplifier (LNA) in the receiver chain, very weak radio signal can be detected. TheWuRx emphasizes higher sensitivity of -90 dBm. The design of the LNA prioritized the highest gain and lowest bias current by sacrifcing the linearity that poses little impact on signal integrity for the OOK modulated signals. The total active power consumption of the TRF WuRx is 1.38 mW. In this work, a fast sampling approach based on power gating protocol allows a drastic reduction in energy consumption on average. By being able to sample in matter of few microseconds, the WuRx is able to detect the presence of a packet and return to sleep state right after packet decoding. Being power-gated dropped the average power consumption to 2.8 µW at a packet detection latency of 32 ms for less than 2 s of interval time between communication requests. The proposed solutions are able to decode a minimum length of 16-bit pattern and operate in the license-free ISM band 868 MHz. This thesis also includes the analysis and implementation of low-power front-end building blocks that are employed by the proposed WuRx.:1 Introduction 1.1 Motivation 1.2 Wake-up Receiver Design Requirements 1.2.1 Energy Consumption 1.2.2 Network Coverage and Robustness 1.2.3 Wake-up Packet Addressing 1.2.4 WuPt Detection Latency 1.2.5 Hosting System, Form-factor and Fabrication Technology 1.3 Thesis Organisation 2 Wireless Sensor Networks 2.1 Radio Communication 2.1.1 Electromagnetic Spectrum 2.1.2 Link Budget Analysis 2.2 Asynchronous Radio Receiver Duty-cycle Control 2.2.1 B-MAC and X-MAC Protocols 2.2.2 Energy and Latency Analysis 2.3 Power Supply Requirements 2.3.1 Low Self-discharge Battery 2.3.2 Energy Harvester 2.4 Summary 3 State-of-the-Art of Wake-up Receivers 3.1 Wake-up Receiver Architectural Analysis 3.1.1 Passive RF Detector 3.1.2 Classical Radio Architectures 3.2 Wake-up Receiver Back-end Stages 3.2.1 Baseband Amplifiers 3.2.2 Analog to Digital Conversion 3.2.3 Wake-up Packet Decoder 3.3 Power Consumption Reduction at Circuit Level 3.3.1 Power Gating 3.3.2 Interference Rejection and Filtering 3.4 Summary 4 Proposal of Novel Wake-up Receivers 4.1 Ultra-low Power On-demand Communication in Wireless Sensor Networks: Challenges and Requirements 4.2 Passive RF Wake-up Receiver 4.3 Power-gated Tuned-RF Wake-up Receiver 5 Low-power RF Front-end 5.1 Narrow-band Low-noise Amplifier (LNA) 5.1.1 Topology 5.1.2 Voltage Gain 5.1.3 Stability 5.1.4 Noise Figure 5.1.5 Linearity 5.2 Envelope Detector 5.2.1 Theory of Square-law Detection and Sensitivity Analysis 5.2.2 Single-Diode Envelope Detector 5.2.3 Voltage Multiplier Envelope Detector 5.3 Hardware Assessment 5.3.1 LNA 5.3.2 Envelope Detector 5.4 Summary 6 Passive RF Wake-up Receiver 6.1 Circuit Implementation 6.1.1 Address Decoder 6.1.2 Envelope Detector 6.1.3 Power-gated Baseband Amplifier 6.1.4 Ultra Low-power Baseband Amplifier 6.2 Experimental Results 6.2.1 Wireless Sensor Node 6.2.2 Measurements 6.3 Summary 7 Power-gated Tuned-RF Wake-up Receiver 7.1 Power-gating Protocol 7.2 Circuit Design 7.2.1 Radio Front-end 7.2.2 Data Slicer 7.2.3 Digital Baseband 7.3 Performance Evaluation 7.4 Summary 8 Conclusion 8.1 Performance Summary 8.2 Future Perspective 8.3 Applications A Two-tone Simulation Setup B Diode Models and Simulation Setup C Preamble Detection C Code Implementation Bibliography Publications / In drahtlosen Sensornetzwerken (WSNs) mit extrem geringem Stromverbrauch müssen Sensorknoten je nach Anwendung kurze Latenzzeiten erreichen ohne die Batterielebensdauer zu beeinträchtigen. Die drahtlose Kommunikation bringt dabei eine ziemliche Belastung mit sich, da der Funktransceiver sowohl während der Sende- als auch der Empfangsphase relativ viel Strom benötigt. Einige marktfähige Funktransceiver benötigen durchschnittlich ca. 10 mA im Empfangsmodus sowie 30 mA im Sendemodus. Deshalb wird heutzutage das sogenannte Duty-Cycling mit bestimmten Sende-, Empfangs- und langen Schlafzeitintervallen eingeführt. Während der Schlafphase ist der Empfänger nicht ansprechbar. Was wiederum zu einer massiven Erhöhung der Latenzzeit führen kann. In vielen Anwendungen und insbesondere im Rahmen der Digitalisierung von Prozessen wird mittlerweile die Fähigkeit On-Demand mit sehr kurzen Latenzzeiten zu kommunizieren verlangt. Diese Anforderung steht in einem Wiederspruch zum genannten Duty-cycle Betrieb. Um dieses Dilemma zu lösen wird im Rahmen dieser Doktorarbeit ein Funkempfänger mit extrem geringen Stromverbrauch untersucht und entwickelt. Mit Hilfe des extrem niedrigen Stromverbrauches kann der Funkempfänger ständig empfangsbereit sein. Er wird zum Hauptempfänger mit dem hohen Stromverbrauch zugeschaltet, so dass nur nach Aufforderung der Hauptempfänger aktiv sein wird. Dieser Empfänger wird Wake-up Empfänger (WuRx) genannt. Seine wesentliche Aufgabe besteht darin, als einziger Teil des Gesamtknotens aktiv zu sein, während der Rest in den Modus mit dem niedrigsten Stromverbrauch versetzt wird. Sobald ein Anforderungssignal empfangen wird, weckt er den Haupt-Prozessor und andere Peripheriegeräte über eine eingehende Kommunikation. Somit ist der Aufweckempfänger essenziell für die Zuverlässigkeit der drahtlosen Kommunikation. Sein Stromverbrauch sollte im µA Bereich sein. Seine Empfangsbereitschaft hängt entscheidend von seiner Empfindlichkeit sowie Bitrate ab. Eine Verbesserung der Empfindlichkeit und Erhöhung der Bitrate würden zwangsläufig zu einer Erhöhung des Stromverbrauches führen. Im Rahmen dieser Doktorarbeit werden unterschiedliche Architekturen von Aufweckempfängern untersucht und umgesetzt. Zusammenhänge zwischen Empfindlichkeit, Bitrate und Stromverbrauch wurden analysiert und mögliche Grenzen gezeigt. Ein wesentliches Augenmerk war dabei, Off-the-Shelf Komponenten zu verwenden. Im Rahmen dieser Doktorabeit wurden in Abhängigkeit von der zu erreichenden Reichweite und Häufigkeit der Kommunikation zwei wesentliche Architekturen mit geeigneten Empfindlichkeiten und extrem geringem Stromverbrauch entwickelt. Für kurze Reichweiten wurde eine passive Hochfrequenzarchitektur (PRF Architektur) basierend auf einer passiven Erkennung von OOK-modulierten (On-Off-Keying) Signalen mittels Hüllkurvenbildung entwickelt. Die erreichte Empfindlichkeit von ca. -64 dBm stellt eine wesentliche Verbesserung gegenüber dem Stand der Technik und Forschung mit einer Empfindlichkeit von ca. -52 dBm dar. Die Empfindlichkeit kann in Bezug auf verschiedene Parameter variieren, einschließlich des insgesamt erzeugten Rauschens, der Schaltungstechnologie und der Topologie. Zwei Varianten der PRF WuRxs wurden realisiert, wobei der Basisbandverstärker die Hauptänderung darstellt. Die erste Version verwendet einen Hochleistungsverstärker mit reduziertem durchschnittlichen Energieverbrauch dank einer neuartigen Leistungssteuerung. Die zweite Variante konzentriert sich auf die Verwendung eines Basisbandverstärkers mit extrem geringer Leistung, da erwartet wird, dass er sich in einem kontinuierlichen aktiven Zustand befindet. Diese Arbeit bringt auch die notwendige Analyse des passiven Front-Ends mit der Absicht, die allgemeine WuRx-Empfindlichkeit zu verbessern. Nachweise der Wirksamkeit sind in Sensorknotenmodulen eingebettet und verfügen über -61 dBm und -64 dBm Empfindlichkeit für die erste bzw. die zweite Variante bei einer Paketfehlerrate (PER) von 1 %, während beim Abhören von Paketen eine ähnliche Leistung von 7.2 µW gefordert wird. Während der Paketdecodierung erfordert die erste Variante eine Leistung von 150 µW, die stark durch den Basisbandverstärker verursacht wird. Die erreichte Latenz beträgt weniger als 30 ms und die Bitrate beträgt 4 kbit/s mit einer Manchester-Codierung. Für Anwendungen mit großer Reichweite wird ein WuRx mit höherer Empfindlichkeit vorgeschlagen. Dieser basiert auf einer TunedRF (TRF) -Architektur. Dabei werden sehr schwache Funksignale durch einen rauscharmen Verstärker (LNA) erkannt und verstärkt. Der WuRx erreicht eine bessere Empfindlichkeit von ca. –90 dBm. Dabei wurde das Augenmerk auf die höchste Verstärkung verbunden mit dem niedrigsten Vorspannungsstrom gelegt. Der LNA wird dann im nicht-linearen Bereich betrieben. Dieser Betriebsmodus beeinflusst nur im geringeren Maße die Signalintegrität der OOK-modulierten Signale. Der gesamte Leistungsverbrauch des TRF WuRx beträgt 1.38 mW. Um den Gesamtleistungsverbrauch im µW Bereich zu reduzieren, wird im Rahmen dieser Arbeit das sogenannte Power-Gating-Protokoll eingeführt. Dabei wird das Funkkanal zyklisch abgetastet. Der WuRx kann innerhalb von wenigen Mikrosekunden das Vorhandensein eines Pakets erkennen und direkt nach der Paketdecodierung in den Ruhezustand zurückkehren. Durch diesen Ansatz konnte der durchschnittliche Stromverbrauch bei einer Paketerkennungslatenz von ca. 32 ms innerhalb einer Abtastrate von 2 s auf 2.8 µW reduziert werden. Die vorgeschlagenen Lösungen können eine Mindestlänge von 16-Bit-Mustern decodieren und im lizenzfreien ISM-Band 868 MHz arbeiten.:1 Introduction 1.1 Motivation 1.2 Wake-up Receiver Design Requirements 1.2.1 Energy Consumption 1.2.2 Network Coverage and Robustness 1.2.3 Wake-up Packet Addressing 1.2.4 WuPt Detection Latency 1.2.5 Hosting System, Form-factor and Fabrication Technology 1.3 Thesis Organisation 2 Wireless Sensor Networks 2.1 Radio Communication 2.1.1 Electromagnetic Spectrum 2.1.2 Link Budget Analysis 2.2 Asynchronous Radio Receiver Duty-cycle Control 2.2.1 B-MAC and X-MAC Protocols 2.2.2 Energy and Latency Analysis 2.3 Power Supply Requirements 2.3.1 Low Self-discharge Battery 2.3.2 Energy Harvester 2.4 Summary 3 State-of-the-Art of Wake-up Receivers 3.1 Wake-up Receiver Architectural Analysis 3.1.1 Passive RF Detector 3.1.2 Classical Radio Architectures 3.2 Wake-up Receiver Back-end Stages 3.2.1 Baseband Amplifiers 3.2.2 Analog to Digital Conversion 3.2.3 Wake-up Packet Decoder 3.3 Power Consumption Reduction at Circuit Level 3.3.1 Power Gating 3.3.2 Interference Rejection and Filtering 3.4 Summary 4 Proposal of Novel Wake-up Receivers 4.1 Ultra-low Power On-demand Communication in Wireless Sensor Networks: Challenges and Requirements 4.2 Passive RF Wake-up Receiver 4.3 Power-gated Tuned-RF Wake-up Receiver 5 Low-power RF Front-end 5.1 Narrow-band Low-noise Amplifier (LNA) 5.1.1 Topology 5.1.2 Voltage Gain 5.1.3 Stability 5.1.4 Noise Figure 5.1.5 Linearity 5.2 Envelope Detector 5.2.1 Theory of Square-law Detection and Sensitivity Analysis 5.2.2 Single-Diode Envelope Detector 5.2.3 Voltage Multiplier Envelope Detector 5.3 Hardware Assessment 5.3.1 LNA 5.3.2 Envelope Detector 5.4 Summary 6 Passive RF Wake-up Receiver 6.1 Circuit Implementation 6.1.1 Address Decoder 6.1.2 Envelope Detector 6.1.3 Power-gated Baseband Amplifier 6.1.4 Ultra Low-power Baseband Amplifier 6.2 Experimental Results 6.2.1 Wireless Sensor Node 6.2.2 Measurements 6.3 Summary 7 Power-gated Tuned-RF Wake-up Receiver 7.1 Power-gating Protocol 7.2 Circuit Design 7.2.1 Radio Front-end 7.2.2 Data Slicer 7.2.3 Digital Baseband 7.3 Performance Evaluation 7.4 Summary 8 Conclusion 8.1 Performance Summary 8.2 Future Perspective 8.3 Applications A Two-tone Simulation Setup B Diode Models and Simulation Setup C Preamble Detection C Code Implementation Bibliography Publications

Page generated in 0.0672 seconds