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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Sudden death processing : an ethnographic study of emergency care

Scott, Patricia January 2003 (has links)
The following doctoral thesis provides an ethnographic account of sudden deathwork performed by emergency personnel. The study centres on three accident and emergency departments in the North East of England. Sudden death practices and perceptions are revealed using thick description from focus groups, narratives and informant accounts. Three emergency disciplines: accident and emergency nurses, police traffic officers and paramedics provide the backdrop to describing three sudden death trajectories, which take the dead body from a state of collapse to a mortuary. Particular attention is paid to the significance of status passage as a temporal dimension of deathwork with due consideration being given to the concept of body handling as 'dirty work'. A feminist concept of embodiment challenges the dominant discourse of the death processing industry in relation to beneficence and non- maleficence for those who are left behind to grieve. The theatrical representation of the body to relatives is discussed within a dramaturgical frame, questioning what is appropriate and achievable within the boundaries of an emergency care environment. An exploration of the roles of emergency personnel illuminates problems of dealing with a phenomenon, which annihilates the possibility of a sense of order and emotionally incapacitates emergency personnel. The procedural base to sudden death is presented through accounts of emergency personnel contact with human suffering and emotional pain with the intention to build a substantive theory of a sudden death milieu. Finally, Schutzian relevances highlight key concepts of significance within the data demonstrating how, despite an evidence-base to practice, some myths are highly influential in shaping the behaviours of emergency personnel throughout the sudden death event. It is hoped that insight gained may provide a catalyst to inform change where needed, in service provision and enhance interprofessional working relationships.
2

Managing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Emergency Personnel: A Qualitative Case Study

Brooks, Jason Lee 01 January 2019 (has links)
The material in current emergency medical services (EMS) curricula is insufficient to prepare prehospital emergency medical care personnel recognize the signs and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) within their workforce. Prehospital emergency textbooks focus on treating patients affected with PTSD, but there is very little included about how EMS professionals may also be affected. Moreover, supervisors and managers of EMS agencies receive very little education on workforce PTSD in their personnel. The purpose of this study was to understand the educational preparation of EMS supervisors in order to develop a PTSD-awareness course. The research question investigated the educational preparation that EMS supervisors receive. The conceptual framework of the study was Conti-O’Hare’s wounded healer theory. EMS professionals are wounded healers from frequent critical incident exposure. A qualitative approach featuring a case study design was used. The study included 9 participants. A focus group was used that consisted of three paramedics and three emergency medical technicians (EMTs). Separate interviews were conducted with three EMS supervisors. Data gained from the focus group and individual interviews were analyzed through coding with the goal of investigating the education received by EMS supervisors on PTSD. The themes that emerged were EMS supervisors do not receive enough education on workforce PTSD and a course specifically targeted on this subject is needed. Positive social change may be achieved through this study by enabling EMS managers to help paramedics and EMTs cope with a critical incident (CI) improving prehospital healthcare.
3

Ambulance Work : Relationships between occupational demands, individual characteristics and health-related outcomes

Aasa, Ulrika January 2005 (has links)
Although musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and other health complaints are an occupational problem for ambulance personnel, there is a lack of knowledge regarding work-related factors associated with MSDs and other health complaints. The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate the relationships between occupational demands, individual characteristics and health-related outcomes among ambulance personnel. A random sample of 234 female and 953 male ambulance personnel participated in a national questionnaire survey on work-related factors, and musculoskeletal and other health complaints. Physical demands was associated with activity limitation due to neck-shoulder and low-back complaints among the female personnel. Among the male personnel, physical demands was associated with low-back complaints and activity limitation due to low-back complaints. Psychological demands was significantly associated with neck-shoulder complaints, sleeping problems, headache and stomach symptoms among both female and male ambulance personnel. Worry about work conditions was associated with musculoskeletal disorders and sleeping problems, headache and stomach symptoms. A local sample of 26 ambulance personnel was followed during a 24-hour work shift and for the next two work-free days. Subjective stress- and energy levels, and cortisol levels were measured at regular intervals, and heart rate was registered continuously by electrocardiogram (ECG). Autonomic reactivity to standardized tests before (pre-work) and at the end of the work shift (post-work) was also investigated. For the whole group, baseline values of heart rate were higher pre-work than post-work, but autonomic reactivity did not differ. Increased reactivity to the mental test, modest deviation in heart rate variability (HRV) pattern during the late night hours at work and higher morning cortisol values during work than during leisure time were observed in personnel with many health complaints, but not among their co-workers without or with few complaints. Ambulance personnel with many health complaints also reported higher psychological demands and tended to be more worried about work conditions. Heart rate (HR), lactate level (LL) and perceived exertion (RPE) were investigated in 17 female and 48 male ambulance personnel during a simulated standardized work task “carry a loaded stretcher”. The ambulance personnel had to carry the loaded stretcher (920 N) up and down three flights of stairs twice. The high physiological strain (HR, LL, RPE) for the male, and near or at maximal strain for the female ambulance personnel, implied the importance to identify what kind of physical capacity is most important for ambulance personnel. Therefore, the explained variance of developed fatigue by tests of cardiorespiratory capacity, muscular strength and endurance, and coordination was investigated. The results showed that VO2max and isometric back endurance were important predictors for development of fatigue when carrying a loaded stretcher. The influence of body size on the relationships between maximal strength and functional performance was investigated in a methodological study. The results confirm that the assessment of physical performance could be confounded by the body weight. Therefore, the models for explaining development of fatigue when carrying the loaded stretcher were adjusted for height and weight. Including height in the models significantly increased the explained variance of accumulated lactate among female, but not among male personnel. Lactate levels were higher among short compared to tall female personnel. Weight had no effect on any of the models. In conclusion, the national survey showed that self-reported physical demands was a risk factor of having MSDs, and that self-reported psychological demands and worry about work were important risk factors of having MSDs and other health complaints. Stress monitoring of ambulance personnel during work and leisure time showed that physiological and subjective stress markers did not show any differences between the 24-hour ambulance work shift and leisure time afterwards. However, ambulance personnel with many health complaints had certain physiological changes during the work shift in comparison with the next two work-free days. The physiological and subjective responses during carrying a loaded stretcher, especially among the female ambulance personnel, showed that female and male ambulance personnel could be exposed to internal exposures at different levels when performing the same work task. A better understanding of the relationships between occupational demands and health-related outcomes require further studies on age- and gender matched groups in long-term perspective studies.

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