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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A study of engineering student attributes and time to completion of first year required courses at Texas A&M University

Kimball, Jorja Lay 17 September 2007 (has links)
For many years, colleges of engineering across the nation have required that a foundational set of courses be completed for entry into upper division coursework or into a specific engineering major. Since 1998, The Dwight Look College of Engineering at Texas A&M University (TAMU) has required that incoming first-time enrolling students complete a Core Body of Knowledge (CBK) with specific cumulative grade points required for specific majors. However, considerations of the time to completion of coursework and other student characteristics and academic factors have not been taken into consideration by TAMU, like most institutions. The purpose of this study is to determine for first year engineering students at TAMU the relationship of gender, ethnicity, engineering major, unmet financial need, cumulative grade point average, and total transfer hours on time to completion of CBK courses. The results of the analysis showed that cumulative grade point average (CGPA) had the strongest relationship to completion of CBK of any independent variable in this study. Statistical significance was found for the following variables in this study: CGPA, gender, ethnicity, and unmet financial need. For the study's variable of major, statistical significance was found for Chemical, Electrical, and Computer Engineering majors. The one variable in this study that did not show statistical significance in relation to time to completion of CBK was transfer credit. Findings with implications for recruitment and retention of underrepresented in engineering is a statistical significance indicating that on average females are taking less time than males to complete CBK. The conclusion from the study is that efforts to attract more women into engineering have merit as do programs to support underrepresented students in order that they may complete CBK at a faster pace. Further study to determine profiles of those majors where statistical significance was found for students taking a greater or lesser amount of time for CBK completion than the mean is recommended, as is ongoing data collection and comparison for current cohorts of engineering majors at TAMU.
2

A Controlled Study of the Flipped Classroom With Numerical Methods for Engineers

Bishop, Jacob L. 01 May 2013 (has links)
Recent advances in technology and ideology have unlocked entirely new directions for education research. Mounting pressure from increasing tuition costs and free, online course offerings are opening discussion and catalyzing change in the physical classroom. The flipped classroom is at the center of this discussion. The flipped classroom is a new pedagogical method, which employs asynchronous video lectures, practice problems as homework, and active, group-based problem-solving activities in the classroom. It represents a unique combination of learning theories once thought to be incompatible—active, problem-based learning activities founded upon constructivist schema and instructional lectures derived from direct instruction methods founded upon behaviorist principles. The primary reason for examining this teaching method is that it holds the promise of delivering the best from both worlds. A controlled study of a sophomore-level numerical methods course was conducted using video lectures and model-eliciting activities (MEAs) in one section (treatment) and traditional group lecture-based teaching in the other (comparison). This study compared knowledge-based outcomes on two dimensions: conceptual understanding and conventional problem-solving ability. Homework and unit exams were used to assess conventional problem-solving ability, while quizzes and a conceptual test were used to measure conceptual understanding. There was no difference between sections on conceptual under- standing as measured by quizzes and concept test scores. The difference between average exam scores was also not significant. However, homework scores were significantly lower by 15.5 percentage points (out of 100), which was equivalent to an effect size of 0.70. This difference appears to be due to the fact that students in the MEA/video lecture section had a higher workload than students in the comparison section and consequently neglected to do some of the homework because it was not heavily weighted in the final course grade. A comparison of student evaluations across the sections of this course revealed that perceptions were significantly lower for the MEA/video lecture section on 3 items (out of 18). Based on student feedback, it is recommended that future implementations ensure tighter integration between MEAs and other required course assignments. This could involve using a higher number of shorter MEAs and more focus on the early introduction of MEAs to students.
3

Enabling 'growth mindsets' in engineering students

Campbell, Anita January 2020 (has links)
Student failure is often attributed to a lack of work by students. While this view has some merit, it implies that only students need to change and reduces the incentive for lecturers, curricula, assessment practices to be interrogated. In this thesis, I take a comprehensive look into why students do not work. Firstly, I place social psychology factors in context with other factors that impact student success and show how beliefs about academic ability underpin the academic behaviour that leads to success. By placing a learning theory lens on six characteristics of fixed mindsets (beliefs that ability can only be developed to an individually pre-determined level) and growth mindsets (beliefs that that effective effort will lead to unlimited self-improvement), I develop a theoretical framework that explains how both fixed and growth mindsets can be encouraged by teaching practices. As students with fixed mindsets may be more vulnerable to dropping out of university, lecturers should be aware of the mindset messages they are sending to students through their words, actions and choice of activities and assessment practices. To address the question of how growth mindsets can be developed, I present results from a systematic literature review of growth mindset interventions aimed at engineering students, drawing on databases in education, engineering, and psychology. The findings show that most interventions involved informing students about mindsets and asking students to reflect on or teach others about mindsets, using personal examples. An intervention was devised to develop growth mindsets in engineering students through tutoring groups on the social media platform WhatsApp. Poor group functioning was addressed using a design-based research approach for the establishment of effective groups. Unexpectedly, assessments of engineering students' mindsets through surveys and interviews showed very low numbers of students with fixed mindset views. Reasons for this result are explained by categorizing growth mindset enablers identified from literature and comparing the literature findings with interview data from engineering students. The thesis culminates by contributing a critique on mindset assessment and a framework for creating learning environments conducive to student success.
4

Changing Pedagogy: The Introduction of Experiential, Cooperative Learning and Interactive Multimedia into the Statics Learning Environment

Bavaro, M. Tina 13 November 1999 (has links)
Teacher change is about moving from thought, feelings and an understanding of teaching and learning into action and practice (Fullan, 1982). This naturalistic case study describes the initial phases of the teacher change process resulting from the implementation of a restructured undergraduate statics engineering course. The investigation focused on the broad research question of what happens when an educator undertakes the teacher change process to allow himself to move away from what is familiar and known (i.e., the traditional pedagogy) into an unknown, new pedagogy. More specifically, the three research questions investigated by this study were : (a) what were the teacher's intentions for changing his pedagogy? (b) what were the actual teaching events over the course of the semester? (c) what were the participant's (i.e., the instructor, students, undergraduate teaching assistant and researchers) perceptions of the pedagogical change? The collection and analysis of the data occurred simultaneously throughout the Fall semester of 1995, and continued into April 1996. Data were collected from transcribed audio recordings of interviews with the instructor, selected students and the undergraduate teaching assistant,written field notes from observations, questionnaires, electronic mail exchanges, student minute papers, and other documents. The data were summarized and coded according to recurring words, phrases, sentences and paragraphs about the instructor's intent for his change in pedagogy, then organized into categories of three change foci : (a) experiential learning, (b) cooperative learning, and (c) interactive multimedia in order to correspond with his intent for the new statics learning environment. Data were displayed in charts and tables to determine issues related to change. The results of this study are presented in terms of a descriptive analysis of the initial teacher change process portrayed through the "multiple realities" of the participants who experienced the pedagogical change. Three issues were evident : (a) the problem of the simultaneous introduction of three new innovations (experiential, cooperative learning and the interactive multimedia), (b) the frustrations of the teacher change process, and (c) difficulties of a paradigm shift in pedagogy when the instructor commences to relinquish control in the new learning environment. Articulation of these issues helps to increase our understanding of the teacher change process and the need to enact change over time. Moreover, lessons learned from this study can serve as guidelines for future researchers in their efforts to study the change process. This study increases our understanding of the teacher change process particularly when one undertakes a paradigm shift in pedagogy. / Ph. D.
5

A Mixed Method Analysis of Factors Influencing Success and Failure in Undergraduate Engineering Capstone Design Experiences

Stresau, Kurt 01 January 2020 (has links)
The engineering undergraduate curriculum presents substantial opportunities for improvement. Society is calling for a transformation. As the culminating experience for undergraduate engineering students, capstone design team projects represent a window on the curriculum and a particularly fertile ground for understanding these opportunities. However, the factors that influence success and failure in capstone remains an area of inquiry. The work presented here proposes to help us develop a deeper understanding of these factors. The research presented here uses a mixed methods analysis approach for identifying the critical factors impacting capstone design team success, where success is defined from both student and faculty perspectives. The framework for the research includes factors and their interactions in three fundamental areas: faculty mentorship, student backgrounds, and various contextual influences. The research capitalizes on the use of survey tools and course data to conduct a mapping of faculty mentor beliefs and practices against student perception and recognition of those practices. In conjunction with student reflective memos containing self-evaluations of their project and team experiences, interactions with faculty mentors, and overall satisfaction with their educational experience, the data will combine to provide a multifaceted assessment of which factors are influential and are value-added to capstone courses. The mixed methods approach will include statistical analysis of programmatic data, student perception of instruction surveys, social network analysis of peer evaluations, faculty teacher belief self-assessments and case-study triangulation with student-authored reflective memoranda. The ultimate objective of this work is to provide an in-depth understanding of the capstone design experience and insights based upon careful analysis and observations of engineering students working on "real-world" projects. It is envisioned that the results of the research will provide meaningful guidance to students, instructors and stakeholders for improved preparation of young engineers for the profession.
6

A study of engineering student attributes and time to completion of first year required courses at Texas A&M University

Kimball, Jorja Lay 17 September 2007 (has links)
For many years, colleges of engineering across the nation have required that a foundational set of courses be completed for entry into upper division coursework or into a specific engineering major. Since 1998, The Dwight Look College of Engineering at Texas A&M University (TAMU) has required that incoming first-time enrolling students complete a Core Body of Knowledge (CBK) with specific cumulative grade points required for specific majors. However, considerations of the time to completion of coursework and other student characteristics and academic factors have not been taken into consideration by TAMU, like most institutions. The purpose of this study is to determine for first year engineering students at TAMU the relationship of gender, ethnicity, engineering major, unmet financial need, cumulative grade point average, and total transfer hours on time to completion of CBK courses. The results of the analysis showed that cumulative grade point average (CGPA) had the strongest relationship to completion of CBK of any independent variable in this study. Statistical significance was found for the following variables in this study: CGPA, gender, ethnicity, and unmet financial need. For the study's variable of major, statistical significance was found for Chemical, Electrical, and Computer Engineering majors. The one variable in this study that did not show statistical significance in relation to time to completion of CBK was transfer credit. Findings with implications for recruitment and retention of underrepresented in engineering is a statistical significance indicating that on average females are taking less time than males to complete CBK. The conclusion from the study is that efforts to attract more women into engineering have merit as do programs to support underrepresented students in order that they may complete CBK at a faster pace. Further study to determine profiles of those majors where statistical significance was found for students taking a greater or lesser amount of time for CBK completion than the mean is recommended, as is ongoing data collection and comparison for current cohorts of engineering majors at TAMU.
7

“Must have that Business Intelligence…!” How to illustrate complex processes by interactive exercises and role playing

Kans, Mirka, Williamsson, Ia January 2012 (has links)
In enterprises we find many complex processes consisting of several sub-processes and actors, each of them contributing to the end outcome. Teaching on complex processes is not easy if the aim is deep knowledge regarding the processes and how different activities and choices will affect the final outcomes. An example of a complex process is the Enterprise Recourse Planning (ERP) systems procurement. A lot of different business representatives are involved in the procurement project, each with their opinion on how the optimal solution looks like. These opinions are often conflicting and the demands too many to be included in the formal requirements specification. Sometimes the requirements are the same, but expressed in different terms. Definition and selection of requirements is one of many potential pitfalls of Information Technology (IT) procurement which is dealt with during a half day exercise in ERP procurement in the course “Integrated Business Solutions”. Through role playing the students experience the transformation of theories into practice by identifying, arguing for or against and thereafter agree upon a limited list of requirements. Another complex activity is the evaluation of alternatives, where the students first need to find suitable candidate systems and thereafter assess how well these satisfy the formulated requirements. The vendor web pages and an online search function provided by a consultant are used. This gives a good basis for discussions regarding assessment of information sources and how decision making is affected by available information. This article describes the purpose and implementation of the above mentioned exercise. The exercise serves as an exemplification of how to create active learning situations that provide hands-on experiences and puts the problem solving and analysis abilities in a real context. Different skills trained during the exercise are highlighted using the Conceive-Design-Implement-Operate (CDIO) syllabus. The article also identifies pitfalls to be avoided when creating this kind of learning situations.
8

Gender differences in reverse engineering

Robles, Mariel E. 14 October 2014 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to investigate possible gender differences related to Reverse Engineering unit of the Engineer Your World curriculum. A pilot study took place in 4 schools in Texas and 1 in Massachusetts. The sample size was 160 students: 121 males and 39 females. Students taking EYW (both as an elective and as a required course) were surveyed about their experiences and interest in reverse engineering before and after the Reverse Engineering unit. Results reported some differences in responses between genders. Females reported a higher curiosity for taking things apart but fewer experiences than the males did, although the difference was not necessary statistically significant. A difference between genders was reported differences in learning about how things that they use on a daily basis (IPhones, digital cameras) work. Despite the students' reported lack of expectation that they would use information learned in the reverse engineering outside of class, they reported an interest in learning more about how things work. / text
9

Integration of engineering components into the AP Physics I curriculum

Manuel, Mariam Afzal 07 November 2014 (has links)
This work examines the integration of engineering topics and design in an Advanced Placement (AP) Physics I course as taught in a large urban district in Texas, herein referred to as the school district, and examines whether engineering integrated into physics instruction accomplishes the same educational objectives as dedicated engineering courses such as the Engineer Your World designed by UTeach Engineering Program at The University of Texas at Austin. (Innovative Curriculum for High School Engineering Design, 2013). Observations were conducted in physics classrooms to view the enactment of district prescribed performance tasks. These performance tasks are open-ended, engineering-type challenges involving real-world scenarios in which students generate products. In addition, two AP Physics I instructors from the district were interviewed, one of whom is affiliated with UTeach engineering. A third instructor outside of the district, who teaches physics and Engineer Your World was also interviewed. The findings reported in this work indicate that AP Physics I courses have the potential to include steps of engineering design in traditional physics project-based instruction as well as the opportunity for instructors to utilize engineering-based examples during instruction. However, AP Physics I with its many curriculum requirements and accelerated pace cannot provide an experience comparable to that of an authentic engineering course. A more effective instructional model would be to teach the two courses concurrently, rather than substituting engineering modules in physics courses for an engineering course. To better integrate physics and engineering instruction, professional development geared towards physics teachers interested in incorporating engineering components into their lessons and projects is needed. / text
10

A guide for planning unique engineering design challenges and an example unit

Jones, Jack Osban 16 April 2013 (has links)
This report describes a generic capstone design project for a high school engineering course. In this unit, the design process is cycled thrice with declining amounts of structure and support. Students are expected to become increasingly independent in the design process by the end of the unit. The generic unit can accommodate many themes, but in order to give a through description, the report focuses on the design of a hovercraft. The bulk of the report presents engineering content needed to design RC hovercraft but readers will hopefully see the hovercraft as more of an example instead of the example. My intention is to inform other teachers of a generic way to conduct this type of engineering unit. Any brevity or lack of detail should be viewed as an opportunity for personalization and creativity. The report includes a review of relevant literature on the topics of student interest and motivation affecting achievement, recommendations on curriculum guidelines by a national review committee and some discussion on coaching students from novice to expert performance / text

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