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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Multi-sensor physical activity measurement in early childhood

McCullough, Aston Kyle January 2018 (has links)
The purpose of this dissertation was to develop, validate, and implement multi-sensor approaches for measuring physical activity and social/contextual covariates in 2-5 year-old children via wearable-, wireless communication-, and infrared-depth camera-based technologies. In Chapter 2, a three-phased study design was used to validate a method for estimating metered distances between wearable devices using accelerometer-derived Bluetooth signals. Results showed that distances, up to 20 meters, can be predicted between a single Bluetooth beacon and receiver using a Random Forest algorithm. When multiple Bluetooth beacons and receivers were used within the same environment, a moving average filter was required to recover observations lost due to noise. Overall, simulation and validation data suggest that accelerometer-derived Bluetooth signals can be used in studies of physical activity co-participation to 1) estimate metered distances between devices using a single beacon-receiver paradigm, as well as to 2) estimate the proportion of time that devices are proximal when using multiple beacons and receivers. Chapter 3 characterized the relationship between objectively measured physical activity and dyadic spatial proximities in 2 year-olds and their parents. Data revealed that the overall proportions of time that children and their parents spent in total physical activity were positively associated, and time series data revealed that this relationship remained consistent when analyzed hour-to-hour. Time spent engaged in sedentary behavior was also positively associated between children and parents; however, there was no association between child and parent moderate-vigorous physical activity volumes. Dyadic proximity results showed that girls spent more time in joint physical activity with their mothers than boys. Furthermore, children who engaged in >60 minutes of daily moderate-vigorous physical activity spent an additional 30 minutes in joint total physical activity with their mothers each day, on average, when compared to children who engaged in <60 minutes of daily moderate-vigorous physical activity. Finally, boys and girls who engaged in >60 minutes of daily moderate-vigorous physical activity participated in joint physical activity with their mothers across wider relative distances, on average, than did boys who engaged in physical activity at closer relative distances to their mothers. In Chapter 4, an original computer vision algorithm was applied to infrared-depth camera data for the purpose of converting three-dimensional videos into triaxial physical activity signals in young children. Physical activity data were collected in 2-5 year-old children during 20-minute semi-structured, indoor child-parent dyadic play sessions. Play session video data were converted into triaxial physical activity signals using a multi-phased computer vision algorithm for each child. Computer vision-derived triaxial physical activity cut points for 2-5 year-olds were calibrated against a direct observation reference system using a machine learning algorithm. Results revealed that triaxial activity signals, as measured by a dual-sensor camera, can be used to estimate both physical activity intensities and volumes in young children without the use of wearable technology. Collectively, these studies show that multi-sensor approaches to physical activity measurement are a valid means by which to measure physical activity and social/contextual covariates in young children using either wearable sensors or computer vision.
2

The effectiveness of a pedometer feedback intervention for increasing physical activity in cardiac rehabilitation patients

Heckman, Jenna L. 05 August 2011 (has links)
Access to abstract permanently restricted to Ball State community only / Access to thesis permanently restricted to Ball State community only / School of Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Science
3

Pedometer intervention to increase physical activity of patients entering a maintenance cardiac rehabilitation program / Title on signature form page: Pedometer intervention to increase the physical activity habits of patients participating in a maitnenance cardiac rehabilitation program

Jones, Jason L. January 2009 (has links)
Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to determine if a pedometer-driven physical activity (PA) intervention with individualized stepcount goals would be more efficacious in yielding greater amounts of PA than the usual time-based PA recommendations given to maintenance CR patients. Additionally, the secondary purpose of this study was to assess differences in stepcount activity on days attending maintenance CR and on non-rehab days. Methods: Subjects entering maintenance CR for the first referral were recruited for study participation and stratified into pedometer feedback (PF) and usual care (UC) groups. All subjects wore a New Lifestyles NL-1000 pedometer. PF subjects wore the pedometer for the duration of the 8-week study. For comparison, UC subjects wore the pedometer at baseline, week 4, and week 8.Both groups were encouraged to accumulate a minimum of 40 - 50 min/d at moderate intensity when attending maintenance CR. UC subjects were encouraged to follow-up with at least 30 min/d PA outside maintenance CR, while PF subjects were given daily stepcount goals. Stepcount goals were calculated as 10% of baseline stepcounts and added weekly to increase daily goal. All subjects completed a 6- minute walk test at baseline and week 8, and behavioral change questionnaires were completed at baseline, week 4, and week 8. Results: A total of 18 subjects (PF, n = 9, 53.7±8.0; UC, n = 9, 60.2±9.6 yrs) completed the 8-week study. There were no differences between groups at baseline. PF group increased daily stepcounts by week 4 (19%, 1,080±649 steps/d) and 8 (44%, 2,468±846 steps/d) in addition to days attending rehab by week 4 (14%, 1064±45 steps/d) and 8 (36%, 2,711±423 steps/d) and non-rehab days by week 8 (42%, 1,747±759 steps/d). PF subjects accumulated greater daily stepcounts compared to UC subjects at weeks 4 (26%, 1,405±393 steps/d) and 8 (48%, 2,612±284 steps/d). UC subjects accumulated greater stepcounts on rehab compared to non-rehab days, but no changes were found from baseline for daily stepcounts, rehab, or non-rehab days. There was a time effect for responses to social support from friends for all subjects (baseline to week 4) and a time by group effect for decision balance pro-questions by week 4 where PF significantly increased, UC significantly decreased, and both groups where significantly different. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that a pedometer-driven PA intervention yields significantly greater stepcounts compared to time-based PA recommendations among maintenance CR patients. / School of Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Science
4

Physical activity change in peripheral artery disease patients / Title on signature form: Physical activity change in peripheral artery disease patients after treatment (PACPAD)

Gunderson, Lisa C. 14 December 2013 (has links)
Access to abstract permanently restricted to Ball State community only. / Access to thesis permanently restricted to Ball State community only. / School of Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Science
5

Comparison of physical activity assessment methods among Phase III cardiac rehabilitation participants

Jones, Nicole L. January 2006 (has links)
Physical inactivity is a significant health concern for individuals in the United States, and is especially an issue for those with a history of coronary artery disease. Increased physical activity is encouraged for those who are participants in Phase III cardiac rehabilitation to promote a healthy lifestyle after a cardiac event. The purpose of the study was to assess and characterize the physical activity levels of Phase III cardiac patients. Other objectives of this study were to compare various forms of physical activity assessment and compare the activity levels of the cardiac rehabilitation participants with other populations. Comparisons of three physical activity devices were analyzed as well as activity levels on rehab and non-rehab days. Those who participated in home exercise vs. those who did not do home exercise were compared as well as those who were retired vs. those who were employed. Subject inclusion criteria included Phase III cardiac patients who were 40-69 years of age and who attended rehab a minimum of two days per week. The subjects were required to wear a pedometer and accelerometer for at least 12 days and complete a questionnaire following the trial. The mean ± S. D. for age, height, weight and BMI of the subjects was 59.4±8.2 years, 69.1±3.1 inches, 200.9±41.8 lbs., and 29.4±4.8 kg/m2 respectively. The Lifecorder, ActiGraph and International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) were used to measure physical activity levels of the Phase III cardiac patients. The IPAQ did not correlate well with the Lifecorder or ActiGraph in assessing physical activity in Phase III cardiac patients (R=0.251, P=0.226-ActiGraph and R=0.280, P=0.175-Lifecorder), however, the Lifecorder and the ActiGraph had a significant correlation coefficient with one another (R=0.83, P<0.001). Rehab vs. non-rehab day data as well as rehab session and non-rehab session physical activity levels were compared among the subjects. On a rehab day, subjects took 9,770±3132 steps/day, which was significantly higher than what they took on a non-rehab day, 5,404±2843 steps/day. Those who did not exercise at home accumulated on average 8,194±2912 steps/day on a rehab day, while on a non-rehab day they accumulated 3,475±1579 steps/day (P<0.001). Those who did exercise at home, took 10,883±2856 steps/day on a rehab day, while on a non rehab day they took 6,767±2768 steps/day (P<0.001). Those who were employed were more active than those who were retired. In conclusion, Phase III cardiac rehabilitation is an effective way to increase physical activity levels of those with a history of coronary artery disease. All participants in Phase III cardiac rehabilitation should be encouraged to come into the center-based facility at least 4-5 days per week or implement a home exercise program into their weekly regimen. / School of Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Science
6

How Activity Monitor Use Is Associated With Motivation and Physical Activity Behavior

Friel, Ciarán Peter January 2018 (has links)
Wearable physical activity (PA) monitors have been adopted by millions of people across the United States, but we do not fully understand who wears them and why. The devices have been promoted as a tool that motivates users by collecting data on their daily activities and delivering tailored feedback based on predetermined goals. The purpose of this dissertation was twofold: 1) To describe users of activity monitors detailing how and why they used this technology, and 2) To explore the motivational profile of activity monitor users and assess how it is related to PA. This dissertation consists of a series of two separate but related studies. The first study recruited over 2000 activity monitor users from across the United States to complete a web-based survey describing why they used this technology and how they interacted with their device. This study showed significant differences in sociodemographic and use characteristics between current and former users and between women and men. Activity monitors were perceived by users as influential on their PA behavior and differences in use patterns between subgroups warranted further exploration of associations between user characteristics, motivation to exercise, and PA. The second study investigated the motivation and PA of activity monitor users. While activity monitors have been widely promoted as a means to motivate users to be more active, the motivational profile of users has never been assessed. While all motivational regulations were significantly correlated with PA, the strongest associations were with the more self-determined motives (integrated, identified and intrinsic respectively). Five motivational profiles emerged from the cluster analysis: ‘High Amotivation’ (n=30), ‘Autonomous with High Introjected’ (n=101), ‘Low Overall Motivation’ (n=61), ‘High Controlled Motivation (n=47), and ‘Autonomous with Low Introjected’ (n=81). Profiles characterized by more autonomous regulations had higher levels of PA. These studies offer new insights on who activity monitor users are, why they decide to use this technology, and how they interact with their devices. While the second study identified an association between motivational profiles and PA, further longitudinal research is needed to assess whether use of an activity monitor impacts the direction and/or magnitude of this relationship.
7

Eating psychopathology in athletes : methods of identification and intervention

Plateau, Carolyn R. January 2014 (has links)
Background: The incidence of eating psychopathology in athletes is considerably higher than in the general population. Facilitating the early identification and successful management of eating problems in this group is therefore essential. Objectives: The thesis aimed to improve our empirical understanding of the identification and management of eating problems in athletes. Three areas were investigated. First, a measure of compulsive exercise was evaluated as a method of identification of eating psychopathology in athletes. Second, the thesis explored coach methods of identification and management of eating problems among their athletes. Finally, athlete experiences of disclosing and seeking treatment for eating disorders were explored. Main findings: The Compulsive Exercise Test was found to be a useful measure in screening for eating psychopathology in athletes. Track and field coaches relied heavily on the physical symptoms of disordered eating when identifying potential eating problems in athletes. Coaches described difficulties in identifying eating psychopathology in athletes, and in signposting athletes to appropriate support. Individual differences in the perceived value of disclosing an eating disorder were discovered among athletes currently seeking treatment. Lastly, athletes described struggling to engage with their eating disorder treatment programme, particularly where exercise was restricted or reduced. Implications: The findings suggest a need for greater support, education and resources for coaches and sports professionals in identifying and facilitating treatment access among their athletes. The Compulsive Exercise Test may be one way to assist sports professionals in identifying athletes with elevated levels of eating psychopathology. Athletes may be more willing to engage with treatment programmes when they are closely involved in goal setting and their exercise and sporting commitments are incorporated where possible.
8

Pedometers in the curriculum: an instrument to enhance student success through wellness education

Unknown Date (has links)
The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of a pedometer-based intervention on physical activity and self-efficacy among community college students in wellness classes (N = 154). The intervention included a pretest/posttest physical activity questionnaire, pedometer use, weekly goal setting and self-report of step data via the web. The experimental group wore pedometers daily for ten weeks; the control group wore pedometers for one week at baseline and week ten. Average weekday physical activity increased 29% for the experimental group and decreased 16% for the control group. Data analysis demonstrated a statistically significant difference due to the treatment regarding step count, differences in mean scores for self-efficacy, and a main effect for treatment for BMI. These results support the effectiveness of pedometer use to increase physical activity and self-efficacy in conjunction with a community college health curriculum. / by Henry J. Allen. / Thesis (M.S.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2009. / Includes bibliography. / Electronic reproduction. Boca Raton, Fla., 2009 Mode of access: World Wide Web.
9

Physical activity validation pilot project in Inuit of the Baffin region

Dénommé, Daneen. January 2006 (has links)
The main goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of physical activity (PA) measurement in an Inuit population with a self-administered questionnaire. The objective was to validate a culturally relevant physical activity questionnaire that measures Inuit PA levels. To do this, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) was evaluated against the Caltrac accelerometer and anthropometric/physiologic measurements. / There were a number of compliance problems encountered when implementing the Caltrac in the pilot community which resulted in too few Caltrac scores available for analyses. However, IPAQ PA score (N=44) was significantly inversely related to Body Mass Index (p≤0.05) and positively related to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p≤0.03). / The results indicate that the IPAQ has potential but needs further refinements to be acceptable to Inuit populations and needs re-evaluation in a larger sample. The participants found it very difficult to remember the time spent performing each activity and, in general, the IPAQ was not well received.
10

Heart Rate and Accelerometry during Singles Footbag Net Play

Siebert, Christopher Michael 01 January 2012 (has links)
This investigation examined the heart rate responses and movement characteristics of experienced footbag net players during singles play. Footbag net is a net/court sport similar to volleyball, but it is played with a footbag (e.g., Hacky-SackTM) using only the feet. In singles footbag net, players are allowed either one or two kicks to propel the footbag over the net. Subjects were 15 males and 1 female, ranging in age from 18- 60 years, with a mean age of 33.6 years. Subjects played two games of singles footbag net using two different scoring systems: "sideout" scoring and "rally" scoring. Mean heart rates were 149.4 bpm for games played under the sideout scoring system and 148.7 bpm for games played under the rally scoring system. Sideout games were 1.2 minutes (~11%) longer than rally games. The mean heart rate responses to competitive play using sideout scoring and rally scoring were not significantly different (p>0.05). For play under both scoring systems, the average exercise intensity--expressed as a percentage of age-predicted maximum heart rate (MHRest)--was 80-81% MHRest. Accelerometer counts accumulated during play were similar for both scoring systems. It is recommended that additional research be conducted to evaluate the extent to which accelerometry may contribute to physiological and metabolic measurements of footbag net competition.

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