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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Novel function of spexin as a satiety factor in feeding control

Wong, Ka-hei, 黃家禧 January 2013 (has links)
Spexin (SPX), also called neuropeptide Q (NPQ), is a novel neuropeptide discovered recently using the bioinformatic approach. Except for mammals, SPX has not been reported in lower vertebrates including fish and amphibians. Following its discovery, the biological functions of this peptide in both higher and lower vertebrates are still largely unknown. To examine the structure and functions of SPX in fish model, molecular cloning of goldfish SPX has been performed and found to be highly comparable to its mammalian counterparts. In goldfish, broad expression of SPX transcripts has been found in various tissues. In vivo feeding studies have revealed that SPX mRNA levels in the telencephalon, optic tectum and hypothalamus of goldfish brain could be elevated by food intake. Brain injection of goldfish SPX, however, inhibited both basal and NPY- and orexin-induced feeding behaviour and food consumption. Similar treatment has also reduced transcript expression of NPY, AGRP and apelin with concurrent rises in CCK, CART, POMC, MCH and CRH mRNA levels in different brain areas examined. The differential effects of goldfish SPX on NPY, CCK and MCH transcript expression could also be noted in vitro in goldfish brain cell culture. In mice, SPX has been also found to be expressed within the brain-gut axis, including the stomach and specific neuronal subpopulations within the hypothalamus, including the ARC, PVN, DMN, and VMN. Similar to goldfish, feeding has shown to affect SPX mRNA and protein expression. Fasted animals have lower SPX mRNA in the stomach, and lower SPX protein levels in the serum and glandular stomach; the opposite effects have been noted in ad libitumfed animals. Both IP and ICV injection of SPX could produce a short-term feeding inhibitory effect. Furthermore, ICV administration of SPX could also downregulate hypothalamic expression of NPY, NPY5R, AGRP, and GHSR mRNA, and upregulate leptin receptor and MC4R gene expression concurrently. Taken together, these findings suggests that SPX may act as a satiety factor in vertebrate species. Apparently, SPX expression could be induced by feeding and the neuropeptide could act centrally to inhibit feeding by differentially regulating orexigenic and anorexigenic signals within the CNS. / published_or_final_version / Biological Sciences / Master / Master of Philosophy
2

A purified diet for trout and the interaction of methionine and vitamin A

Eckhert, Curtis Dale, 1944- January 1971 (has links)
No description available.
3

Studies on the effects of dietary composition and ration on the growth of oreochromis mossambicus in freshwater and seawater: a bioenergetic approach.

January 1989 (has links)
by Chow Cheuk Yi. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1989. / Bibliography: leaves 179-192.
4

The nutritional value of dietary fibre for rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneiri)

Davies, Simon John January 1984 (has links)
The nutritional value of dietary fibre for rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri was investigated using juvenile fish (lO-30g) maintained in freshwater at ambient temperatures under a natural photo period. A preliminary experiment was conducted using five purified dietary fibre sources, namely, a~cellulose, lignin, lignosulphonate, galactomannan and chitin ·which varied in physical, chemical and textural characteristics. A commercially available, powdered polyethylene was also used as an inert control ingredient and all sources of fibre were included at a, realistically low level of 5'% in separate semi-purified diets. Although there were no significant differences in the growth of fish at the end of the 10-week trial, several nutritional parameters were affected for rainbow trout fed the different experimental treatments. Mean daily food intake was re"d uced for trout receiving the lignin, chitin and galactomannan diets compared to the polyethylene control. Similarly the food conversion ratios (FeR) and protein efficiency ratios (PER) were relatively inferior for diets containing chitin and galactomannan compared to the lignosulphonate treatment. Maximum net dietary nitrogen utilization was obtained for the polyethylene control t' ... ra ~on whilst lower values were again observed with chitin and galactomannan. Apparent dry matter (DM) and nitrogen digestibility coefficients however were in close agreement for each of the dietary treatments except for the lignin diet which was poorly digested. Generally the results implied that the properties of chitin and galactomannan were worthy of further study at higher inclusion levels and in different physical states. A specific·investigation in which 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% additions of a purified a-cellulose replaced dietary starch in separate experimental di e t s f a~'1 e d to produce any significant changes in the growth performance of trout and only slightly influenced nutrient utilization at the higher 15 and 20% inclusion levels. Negative digestibility coefficients for the 'unavailable' carbohydrate fraction of diets calculated from the 'total' and 'available' carbohydrate contents of diet and faecal samples was considered to be evidence of the non-nutritive and bulking qualities of a-cellulose. Growth and digestibility trials were then undertaken to examine the effects of including different levels (10 and 20%) and particle size ranges (45-500, 500-1000 microns) of chitin (poly-Nacetyl- D glucosamine) as a natural source of dietary fibre for trout. In a similar experiment, graded amounts of galactomannan polysaccharide (0, 10 and 20%) were added to moist pelleted diets to examine the long term effects of feeding a gel-type fibre characteristic' of many commercially available binding agents. Negative digestibility coefficients for both chitin and galactomannan based on specific biochemical measurements together with the failure to detect any chitinase activity in stomach and intestinal tissue was confirmation of the inability of rainbow trout to degrade and utilize these materials. Coarse grades of chitin at the 10 and 20% levels impaired food intake, growth performance and nutrient utilization as shown by the Poorer FCR, PER, net nitrogen utilization and digestibility coefficients compared to the diets containing finely ground chitin or the α-cellulose control treatment. Similar findings were obtained with increasing additions of galactomannan and there were associated reductions in the serum glucose and protein concentrations with each increment of dietary galactomannan. The final carcass compositions of fish were also affected by the gel fibre which caused a significant reduction in the tissue lipid content and an inverse trend in moisture content compared to trout receiving an a-cellulose control diet. Further investigations using a sacrificial method to follow and quantify the passage of food through the gastrointestinal tract revealed that the physical properties of fibre such as particle size composition, water retaining capacity and viscosity were among several factors which modified gastric evacuation and digestion rates in rainbow trout. From the predicted gastric emptying times (GET), it was apparent that coarsely graded chitin (20%) and both 10 and 20% inclusions of galactomannan considerably increased the residence time of the gastrointestinal contents compared to finely ground chitin and a control diet without added fibre. Although an exponential relationship was found to best describe the stomach emptying profiles obtained, linearization of the data was achieved by applying surface area and volume dependent mathematical models which emphasized the importance of these physical factors. The combined nutrition and physiological studies supported the contention that fibre is the non-nutritive part of the diet, but it Was concluded that the level and nature of the fibrous material has· important consequences on the processes controlling food intake and the efficiency of digestion, which in turn may affect the assimilation of nutrients and the performance of growing rainbow trout.
5

Centrarchid feeding interactions in a small desert impoundment

Biggins, Richard G. January 1968 (has links)
No description available.
6

Food habits and feeding relationships of Satilla River fishes

Henry, Robert Liddell 12 1900 (has links)
No description available.
7

Feeding behaviour in fry of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L.

Browman, Howard I. January 1985 (has links)
No description available.
8

Rate of food exploitation by littoral fishes

Boisclair, Daniel. January 1984 (has links)
No description available.
9

Studies on the use of fermented fish silage in diets for juvenile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and catfish (Clarias gariepinus)

Fagbenro, Oyedapo Adewale January 1994 (has links)
Fermented silage was prepared from a mixture of minced tiiapias (Oreochromis spp. ), different carbohydrate substrates (molasses, corn flour, tapioca flour) and Lactobacillus plantarum as inoculum, incubated anaerobically for 30 days at 5°-35°C. The pH and protein solubilization were temperature-dependent, and the source of carbohydrate substrate did not affect non-protein nitrogen (NPN) content or proximate composition of tilapla silage. During storage at 30°C for 180 days, NPN content increased and there was 8-11% loss of tryptophan. Moist diets containing tilapla silage (stored up to 60 days) were fed to Clarias gariepinus and differences in growth and protein utilization were demonstrated, but there were no effects on body composition. Partial replacement of fish meal with co-dried tilapla silage and soybean flour blend (FSS: BF) in dry diets supported growth and protein utilization similar to the control treatment. Fish growth and protein utilization were reduced with total replacement of fish meal. Apparent protein digestibility decreased with Increasing dietary level of co-dried FSS: BF. Carcass composition was not affected and morphological defects were not observed. Co-dried tilapla silage blended with soybean meal, poultry by-product meal, hydrolysed feather meal or meat and bone meal (FSS: BM, FSP: BM, FSH: FM, FSM: BM) (providing 50% of the dietary protein) In dry diets fed to Oreochromis niloticus and Clarias gariepinus gave differences In growth, protein utilization and digestibility, and apparent energy digestibility. Carcass composition was not affected by silage blend and histological examination of exocrine pancreas, liver and Intestine tissues did not show any lesions suggestive of nutritional imbalance. Haematocrit, haemoglobin content and mean cell haemoglobin concentration values showed no differences among the treatments. The results indicated that fermented tilapla silage is a suitable protein supplement in moist or dry diets for Oreochromis niloticus and Clarias gariepinus, without affecting feed efficiency, fish growth or health.
10

Yeast from papaya processing wastes as aquaculture feed supplement

Kang, Hsu-Ya January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2007. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 127-136). / x, 136 leaves, bound ill. 29 cm

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