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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Ogden's lemma for random permitting and forbidding context picture languages and table-driven context-free picture languages

Idahosa, Joy O 06 May 2015 (has links)
A dissertation submitted to the Faculty of Science, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, in fulfilment of requirements for the degree of Master of Science. Johannesburg, February 16, 2015. / Random context picture grammars are used to generate pictures through successive refinement. There are three important subclasses of random context picture grammars, namely random permitting context picture grammars, random forbidding context picture grammars and table-driven context-free picture grammars. These grammars generate the random permitting context picture languages, random forbidding context picture languages and table-driven context-free picture languages, respectively. Theorems exist which provide necessary conditions that have to be satisfied by a language before it can be classified under a particular subclass. Some of these theorems include the pumping and shrinking lemmas, which have been developed for random permitting context picture languages and random forbidding context picture languages respectively. Two characterization theorems were developed for the table-driven context-free picture languages. This dissertation examines these existing theorems for picture languages, i.e., the pumping and shrinking lemmas and the two characterisation theorems, and attempts to prove theorems, which will provide an alternative to the existing theorems and thus provide new tools for identifying languages that do not belong to the various classes. This will be done by adapting Ogden’s idea of marking parts of a word which was done for the string case. Our theorems essentially involve marking parts of a picture such that the pumping operation increases the number of marked symbols and the shrinking operation reduces it.
2

On context-free derivations

Mäkinen, Erkki. January 1985 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Tampere, 1985. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 91-94).
3

Knowledge representation in mathematics : a case study in graph theory /

Epstein, Susan Lynn. January 1983 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Rutgers University, 1983. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 271-274).
4

Some combinatorial and algebraic problems related to subwords

Péladeau, Pierre. January 1986 (has links)
No description available.
5

A survey of Greibach normal form : transformation & analysis /

Ho, Man Chi. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (M.Phil.)--Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, 2006. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 49-50). Also available in electronic version.
6

Desátomat - aplikace pro názornou výuku problematiky formálních gramatik

Dusíková, Hana January 2011 (has links)
No description available.
7

Some combinatorial and algebraic problems related to subwords

Péladeau, Pierre. January 1986 (has links)
No description available.
8

Some results on systolic tree automata as acceptors

Foufa, Aouaouche Fazileit January 1985 (has links)
No description available.
9

Applications of algebraic automata theory to quantum finite automata

Mercer, Mark. January 2007 (has links)
No description available.
10

TELEMETRY AS AUTOMATA

Jones, Charles H. 11 1900 (has links)
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings / October 30-November 02, 1995 / Riviera Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada / In its simplest form an automaton can be considered a set of inputs, a process, and a set of outputs. Certainly telemetry can be thought of in this way as well. Automata theory is a cross between mathematics and computer science which considers how to precisely define the inputs, the outputs, and the process of translating the one into the other. The input to an automaton can be described using a formal grammar. Two standard bit stream encodings, PCM matrices and MIL-STD-1553, are described using grammars. An example of how a grammar can be used to decode a bit stream is given. Further, ambiguity and complexity of bit stream encodings are discussed in the context of grammars. It is thus illustrated how grammars can be used to cleanly define and decode telemetry bit streams.

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