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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Exploiting replication in automated program verification

Wahl, Thomas, 1973- 28 August 2008 (has links)
Not available
2

Regular model checking /

Nilsson, Marcus, January 2005 (has links)
Diss. Uppsala : Univ., 2005.
3

Model checking parameterized timed systems /

Mahata, Pritha, January 2005 (has links)
Diss. Uppsala : Uppsala universitet, 2005.
4

A graph theoretic approach to assessing tradeoffs on memory usage for model checking

Powell, John D. January 2000 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--West Virginia University, 2000. / Title from document title page. Document formatted into pages; contains vii, 167 p. : ill. Includes abstract. Includes bibliographical references (p. 107-109).
5

Exploiting replication in automated program verification

Wahl, Thomas, January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2007. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references.
6

Efficient and effective symbolic model checking

Iyer, Subramanian Krishnan 28 August 2008 (has links)
Not available / text
7

Combining advanced formal hardware verification techniques

Reeber, Erik Henry, 1978- 29 August 2008 (has links)
This dissertation combines formal verification techniques in an attempt to reduce the human effort required to verify large systems formally. One method to reduce the human effort required by formal verification is to modify general-purpose theorem proving techniques to increase the number of lemma instances considered automatically. Such a modification to the forward chaining proof technique within the ACL2 theorem prover is described. This dissertation identifies a decidable subclass of the ACL2 logic, the Subclass of Unrollable List Formulas in ACL2 (SUFLA). SUFLA is shown to be decidable, i.e., there exists an algorithm that decides whether any SUFLA formula is valid. Theorems from first-order logic can be proven through a methodology that combines interactive theorem proving with a fully-automated solver for SUFLA formulas. This methodology has been applied to the verification of components of the TRIPS processor, a prototype processor designed and fabricated by the University of Texas and IBM. Also, a fully-automated procedure for the Satisfiability Modulo Theory (SMT) of bit vectors is implemented by combining a solver for SUFLA formulas with the ACL2 theorem prover's general-purpose rewriting proof technique. A new methodology for combining theorem proving and model checking is presented, which uses a unique "black-box" formalization of hardware designs. This methodology has been used to combine the ACL2 theorem prover with IBM's SixthSense model checker and applied to the verification of a high-performance industrial multiplier design. A general-purpose mechanism has been created for adding external tools to a general-purpose theorem prover. This mechanism, implemented in the ACL2 theorem prover, is capable of supporting the combination of ACL2 with both SixthSense and the SAT-based SUFLA solver. A new hardware description language, DE2, is described. DE2 has a number of unique features geared towards simplifying formal verification, including a relatively simple formal semantics, support for the description of circuit generators, and support for embedding non-functional constructs within a hardware design. The composition of these techniques extend our knowledge of the languages and logics needed for formal verification and should reduce the human effort required to verify large hardware circuit models.
8

Generalization, lemma generation, and induction in ACL2

Erickson, John D., Ph. D. 29 August 2008 (has links)
Formal verification is becoming a critical tool for designing software and hardware today. Rising complexity, along with software's pervasiveness in the global economy have meant that errors are becoming more difficult to find and more costly to fix. Among the formal verification tools available today, theorem provers offer the ability to do the most complete verification of the most complex systems. However, theorem proving requires expert guidance and typically is too costly to be economical for all but the most mission critical systems. Three major challenges to using a theorem prover are: finding generalizations, choosing the right induction scheme, and generating lemmas. In this dissertation we study all three of these in the context of the ACL2 theorem prover. / text
9

Ethics and the practice of software design

Turilli, Matteo January 2012 (has links)
No description available.
10

Combining advanced formal hardware verification techniques

Reeber, Erik Henry, January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2007. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references.

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