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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Realistic, Efficient and Secure Geographic Routing in Vehicular Networks

Zhang, Lei 10 March 2015 (has links)
It is believed that the next few decades will witness the booming development of the Internet of Things (IoT). Vehicular network, as a significant component of IoT, has attracted lots of attention from both academia and industry in recent years. In the field of vehicular networks, Vehicular Ad hoc NETwork (VANET) is one of the hottest topics investigated. This dissertation focuses on VANET geocast, which is a special form of multicast in VANET. In geocast, messages are delivered to a group of destinations in the network identified by their geographic locations. Geocast has many promising applications, i.e., geographic messaging, geographic advertising and other location-based services. Two phases are usually considered in the geocast process: phase one, message delivery from the message source to the destination area by geographic routing; phase two, message broadcast within the destination area. This dissertation covers topics in the two phases of geocast in urban VANETs, where for phase one, a data-driven geographic routing scheme and a security and privacy preserving framework are presented; and for phase two, the networking connectivity is analyzed and studied. The contributions of this dissertation are three-fold. First, from a real-world data trace study, this dissertation studies the city taxi- cab mobility. It proposes a mobility-contact-aware geocast scheme (GeoMobCon)for metropolitan-scale urban VANETs. The proposed scheme employs the node mobility (two levels, i.e., macroscopic and microscopic mobilities) and contact history information. A buffer management scheme is also introduced to further improve the performance. Second, this dissertation investigates the connectivity of the message broadcast in urban scenarios. It models the message broadcast in urban VANETs as the directed connectivity problem on 2D square lattices and proposes an algorithm to derive the exact analytical solution. The approach is also applied to urban VANET scenarios, where both homogeneous and heterogeneous vehicle density cases are considered. Third, this work focuses on the security and privacy perspectives of the opportunistic routing, which is the main technique utilized by the proposed geographic routing scheme. It proposes a secure and privacy preserving framework for the general opportunistic-based routing. A comprehensive evaluation of the framework is also provided. In summary, this dissertation focuses on a few important aspects of the two phases of VANET geocast in urban scenarios. It shows that the vehicle mobility and contact information can be utilized to improve the geographic routing performance for large- scale VANET systems. Targeting at the opportunistic routing, a security and privacy preserving framework is proposed to preserve the confidentiality of the routing metric information for the privacy purpose, and it also helps to achieve the anonymous authentication and efficient key agreement for security purposes. On the other hand, the network connectivity for the message broadcast in urban scenarios is studied quantitatively with the proposed solution, which enables us to have a better understanding of the connectivity itself and its impact factors (e.g., bond probability and network scale). / Graduate
2

Semantic and Self-Decision Geocast Protocol for Data Dissemination over Vehicle Ad Hoc Network

Alsubaihi, Badr January 2014 (has links)
In this work, we provide a qualitative comparison between existing geocast protocols and then we present an efficient geocast routing protocol for VANET. This protocol is a semantic and self-decision geocast routing protocol for disseminating safety and non-safety information over VANET (SAS-GP). SAS-PG initially executes an algorithm to locally determine the semantic geocast area. Then, the protocol disseminates the information in three phases: Spread, Preserve, and Assurance, which utilize the traffic information system and the digital map. SAS-GP principally employs timer-based techniques in order to avoid overhead and broadcast storm problems; nonetheless, novel factors are enhanced to calculate the timer’s values in each phase. Simulation results demonstrate effective and reliable dissemination in terms of delivery ratio and number of false warnings compared to existing protocols when evaluated in high scale and realistic scenarios. Also, SAS-GP performs faster in notifying vehicles resulting in a higher geocast distance before approaching the location of the event.
3

EFFICIENT GREEDY-FACE-GREEDY GEOGRAPHIC ROUTING PROTOCOLS IN MOBILE AD HOC AND SENSOR NETWORKS

Sun, Yan 01 January 2012 (has links)
This thesis describes and develops two planarization algorithms for geographic routing and a geographic routing protocol for mobile ad hoc and sensor networks. As all nodes are mobile and there is no fixed infrastructure, the design of routing protocols is one of the most challenging issues in mobile ad hoc and sensor networks. In recent years, greedyface- greedy (GFG) geographic routing protocols have been widely used, which need nodes to construct planar graphs as the underlying graphs for face routing. Two kinds of planarization algorithms have been developed, idealized and realistic planarization algorithms, respectively. The idealized planarization algorithms make the ideal assumption that the original network graph is a unit-disk graph (UDG). On the other hand, the realistic planarization algorithms do not need the original network to be a UDG. We propose an idealized planarization algorithm, which constructs an Edge Constrained Localized Delaunay graph (ECLDel). Compared to the existing planarized localized Delaunay graph [42], the construction of an ECLDel graph is far simpler, which reduces the communication cost and saves the network bandwidth. We propose a Pre-Processed Cross Link Detection Protocol (PPCLDP), which generates a planar spanning subgraph of the original network graph in realistic environments with obstacles. The proposed PPCLDP outperforms the existing Cross Link Detection Protocol [32] with much lower communication cost and better convergence time. In GFG routing protocols, greedy routing may fail at concave nodes, in which case, face routing is applied to recover from the greedy routing failure. This may cause extra hops in routing in networks containing voids. We propose a Hill-Area-Restricted (HAR) routing protocol, which avoids the extra hops taken in the original GFG routing. Compared to the existing Node Elevation Ad hoc Routing [4], the proposed HAR guarantees the packet delivery and decreases the communication cost greatly.
4

RESOURCE ALLOCATION AND EFFICIENT ROUTING IN WIRELESS NETWORKS

Yang, Jianjun 01 January 2011 (has links)
In wireless networks, devices (nodes) are connected by wireless links. An important issue is to set up high quality (high bandwidth) and efficient routing paths when one node wants to send packets to other nodes. Resource allocation is the foundation to guarantee high quality connections. In addition, it is critical to handle void areas in order to set up detour-free paths. Moreover, fast message broadcasting is essential in mobile wireless networks. Thus, my research includes dynamic channel allocation in wireless mesh networks, geographic routing in Ad Hoc networks, and message broadcasting in vehicular networks. The quality of connections in a wireless mesh network can be improved by equip- ping mesh nodes with multi-radios capable of tuning to non-overlapping channels. The essential problem is how to allocate channels to these multi-radio nodes. We develop a new bipartite-graph based channel allocation algorithm, which can improve bandwidth utilization and lower the possibility of starvation. Geographic routing in Ad Hoc networks is scalable and normally loop-free. However, traditional routing protocols often result in long detour paths when holes exist. We propose a routing protocol-Intermediate Target based Geographic Routing (ITGR) to solve this problem. The novelty is that a single forwarding path can be used to reduce the lengths of many future routing paths. We also develop a protocol called Hole Detection and Adaptive Geographic Routing, which identifies the holes efficiently by comparing the length of a routing path with the Euclidean distance between a pair of nodes. We then set up the shortest path based on it. Vehicles play an important role in our daily life. During inter-vehicle communication, it is essential that emergency information can be broadcast to surrounding vehicles quickly. We devise an approach that can find the best re-broadcasting node and propagate the message as fast as possible.
5

Dead Reckoning Location Service For Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

Kumar, Vijay January 2002 (has links)
No description available.
6

Rörelsebaserad kommunikation i mobila ad hoc-nätverk / Movement based communication in mobile ad hoc networks

Wandemo, Daniel January 2007 (has links)
<p>I många nätverk antas det att någon form av fix infrastruktur existerar och att nätverkets olika noder kan använda denna för att kommunicera med varandra. I ett ad hoc-nätverk antar man att det inte finns någon fix infrastruktur och att noderna måste använda varandra för att kunna kommunicera. Ett exempel på ett ad hoc-nätverk kan vara bärbara datorer sammankopplade med infraröda länkar under ett möte. När ad hoc-nätverket är mobilt innebär det att noderna rör sig.</p><p>I detta arbete har de tre protokollen Epidemic, GeoMean och GeoMove tillsammans med de två rörelsemodellerna Waypoint och den utökade slumpmässiga vandringen implementerats i en nyskriven simulator för denna typ av nätverk.</p><p>De två Geo-protokollen är nyutvecklade och syftar till att använda geografisk information för att underlätta kommunikationen i denna kategori av nätverk tillsammans med den nya utvidgade slumpmässiga vandringsmodellen.</p> / <p>In many networks, some kind of fix infrastructure is assumed to exist and the nodes of the network can use this infrastructure to communicate with each other. In an ad hoc network one assumes that there don't exist any kind of fix infrastructure and that the nodes must use each other to be able to communicate. One example of an ad hoc network could be laptops connected together with infrared links during a meeting. When an ad hoc network is mobile it implies that the nodes are moving.</p><p>In this work, the three protocols Epidemic, GeoMean and GeoMove together with the two mobility models Waypoint and Extended Random Walk, have been implemented in a newly written simulator for this kind of network.</p><p>The two Geo-protocols are newly developed and aim to use geographical information to aid communication in this category of networks together with the new Extended Random Walk model.</p>
7

Rörelsebaserad kommunikation i mobila ad hoc-nätverk / Movement based communication in mobile ad hoc networks

Wandemo, Daniel January 2007 (has links)
I många nätverk antas det att någon form av fix infrastruktur existerar och att nätverkets olika noder kan använda denna för att kommunicera med varandra. I ett ad hoc-nätverk antar man att det inte finns någon fix infrastruktur och att noderna måste använda varandra för att kunna kommunicera. Ett exempel på ett ad hoc-nätverk kan vara bärbara datorer sammankopplade med infraröda länkar under ett möte. När ad hoc-nätverket är mobilt innebär det att noderna rör sig. I detta arbete har de tre protokollen Epidemic, GeoMean och GeoMove tillsammans med de två rörelsemodellerna Waypoint och den utökade slumpmässiga vandringen implementerats i en nyskriven simulator för denna typ av nätverk. De två Geo-protokollen är nyutvecklade och syftar till att använda geografisk information för att underlätta kommunikationen i denna kategori av nätverk tillsammans med den nya utvidgade slumpmässiga vandringsmodellen. / In many networks, some kind of fix infrastructure is assumed to exist and the nodes of the network can use this infrastructure to communicate with each other. In an ad hoc network one assumes that there don't exist any kind of fix infrastructure and that the nodes must use each other to be able to communicate. One example of an ad hoc network could be laptops connected together with infrared links during a meeting. When an ad hoc network is mobile it implies that the nodes are moving. In this work, the three protocols Epidemic, GeoMean and GeoMove together with the two mobility models Waypoint and Extended Random Walk, have been implemented in a newly written simulator for this kind of network. The two Geo-protocols are newly developed and aim to use geographical information to aid communication in this category of networks together with the new Extended Random Walk model.
8

A Framework for Routing in Fully- and Partially-Covered Three Dimensional Wireless Sensor Networks

El Salti, TAREK 02 January 2013 (has links)
Recently, many natural disasters have occurred (e.g., the 2011 tsunami in Japan). In response to those disasters, Wireless Sensor Networks have been proposed to improve their detection level. This new technology has two main challenges which are routing and topology control where their multi-dimensional dilations need to be improved/balanced. Related to those metrics, the packet delivery factor also needs to be improved/guaranteed. This thesis presents the design of new routing protocols, referred to as: 1) the 3-D Sensing Sphere close to the Line:Smallest Angle to the Line (SSL:SAL) protocol, 2) the 3-D Randomized Sensing Spheres (RSS) protocol, and 3) the SSL:SAL version 1 and version 2 (i.e., SSL:SALv1 and SSL:SALv2, respectively). Through simulations, these protocols are shown to balance/improve the multi-dimensional dilations metrics which also include new bandwidth metrics. The balance/improvement is achieved over some existing position-based protocols. In addition, packet delivery is guaranteed mathematically for new and existing protocols. Furthermore, some experimental evidences are gathered regarding the delivery rate impact on the multi-dimensional metrics. The thesis also proposes a new set of 2-D and 3-D graphs, so called: 1) the Derived Circle version 1 (DCv1) graphs and 2) the Derived Sphere (DSv1) graphs. The new approaches improve the multi-dimensional dilations over some existing graphs. In addition, connectivity, rotability, fault tolerance properties are achieved. Lastly, the thesis develops a framework that combines routing protocols and graphs in fully covered regions. Some experimental evidences demonstrate the improvement of the multi-dimensional metrics and the packet delivery rate for the routing protocols based on the DSv1. This is compared to the routing protocols based on an existing graph. Furthermore, based on either the proposed or existing graphs, some important findings are demonstrated for routing in terms of multi-dimensional metrics and packet delivery rate. Among those findings, the proposed protocol and an exiting protocol have higher delivery rates compared to another existing protocol. Furthermore, the proposed graph improves the multi-dimensional metrics for the proposed and existing protocols over another existing protocol for low communication ranges.
9

Analysis and application of hop count in multi-hop wireless ad-hoc networks

Chen, Quanjun, Computer Science & Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, UNSW January 2009 (has links)
Hop count, i.e., the number of wireless hops a packet has to go through to reach the destination, is a fundamental metric in multi-hop wireless ad-hoc networks. Network performance, such as throughput, end-to-end delay, energy consumption, and so on, depends critically on hop count. Previous work on modeling hop count is limited in making unrealistic simplifying assumptions either at the physical or network, or both layers of the communication protocol stack. A key contribution of this thesis is to present an analytical model to derive the probability distribution of hop count under realistic assumptions at both physical and network layers. Specifically, the model considers a log-normal shadowing radio propagation capable of accommodating the random signal fading observed in most wireless communication environments, and the widely used geographic routing at the network layer. Validation of the model is achieved by a comprehensive set of simulation experiments including a trace driven simulation of a real-word vehicular ad-hoc network. The model reveals that the presence of randomness in radio propagation reduces the required number of hops to reach a given destination significantly. To demonstrate the utility of the proposed hop count model, the thesis proposes three new applications which address some of the key challenges in multi-hop wireless networks. The first application derives the per-node packet forwarding load in multi-hop wireless sensor networks and reveals that the nodes in the vicinity of the base station has a significantly less forwarding load than previously thought under simplifying radio propagation and routing assumptions. The second application demonstrates that using hop count as a measure of distance traveled by a data packet, geocasting can be achieved in multi-hop wireless networks in situations when some of the network nodes do not have access to reliable location information. Finally, the proposed hop count model is used to evaluate the performance of the third application which demonstrates that the overhead of geographic routing can be reduced significantly by embracing a position update philosophy which adapts to the mobility and communication patterns of the underlying ad-hoc network.
10

Analysis and application of hop count in multi-hop wireless ad-hoc networks

Chen, Quanjun, Computer Science & Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, UNSW January 2009 (has links)
Hop count, i.e., the number of wireless hops a packet has to go through to reach the destination, is a fundamental metric in multi-hop wireless ad-hoc networks. Network performance, such as throughput, end-to-end delay, energy consumption, and so on, depends critically on hop count. Previous work on modeling hop count is limited in making unrealistic simplifying assumptions either at the physical or network, or both layers of the communication protocol stack. A key contribution of this thesis is to present an analytical model to derive the probability distribution of hop count under realistic assumptions at both physical and network layers. Specifically, the model considers a log-normal shadowing radio propagation capable of accommodating the random signal fading observed in most wireless communication environments, and the widely used geographic routing at the network layer. Validation of the model is achieved by a comprehensive set of simulation experiments including a trace driven simulation of a real-word vehicular ad-hoc network. The model reveals that the presence of randomness in radio propagation reduces the required number of hops to reach a given destination significantly. To demonstrate the utility of the proposed hop count model, the thesis proposes three new applications which address some of the key challenges in multi-hop wireless networks. The first application derives the per-node packet forwarding load in multi-hop wireless sensor networks and reveals that the nodes in the vicinity of the base station has a significantly less forwarding load than previously thought under simplifying radio propagation and routing assumptions. The second application demonstrates that using hop count as a measure of distance traveled by a data packet, geocasting can be achieved in multi-hop wireless networks in situations when some of the network nodes do not have access to reliable location information. Finally, the proposed hop count model is used to evaluate the performance of the third application which demonstrates that the overhead of geographic routing can be reduced significantly by embracing a position update philosophy which adapts to the mobility and communication patterns of the underlying ad-hoc network.

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