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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Programs for intellectually gifted children in selected junior high schools

Rankin, Wilfred Warren 01 January 1957 (has links)
It was the purpose of this study to survey (1) the procedures now used in the selection of gifted pupils in selected junior high schools of northern California; (2) the selection of teachers for these pupils; (3) the curricular features of their instruction; and (4) the factors determining these procedures.
2

An investigation of the Four Area Curriculum Extension and Enrichment Model for Gifted Education as viewed through the Cartesian, Socialist and Deep Ecology epistemologies

Mentz, Hendrik Jeremy January 1991 (has links)
Because giftedness is a complex, little understood concept which has become politicised, it was deemed necessary to evaluate the Four Area Curriculum Extension and Enrichment model in terms of three epistemological focuses: Cartesian, Socialist and Deep Ecology. Reasons for the selection of these three epistemologies are discussed after which the traditional Cartesian, homunculus view of giftedness is shown to be flawed and a case made for reconceptualizing giftedness to confirm its collective, socially constructed, immanent nature, grounded in the existential human condition. The rationale behind, and design of the Four Area model as reflected in the guide to schools is shown to reflect the Deep Ecology epistemology. The philosophical statement, goal and aims of the guide are shown as clashing with the Deep Ecology ideology. In order to avoid epistemological dissonance, a reformulated statement of intent for the Four Area model which merges the Cartesian, Socialist and Deep Ecology epistemologies into a unitary aim is suggested. The design, short-term success and appropriateness of each of the four Areas of provision are analyzed and evaluated in the light of critical theory as also questionnaires and annual reports completed by principals and co-ordinators. Modifications to aspects of the Four Area model are recommended which, it is argued, will give it greater contextual relevance and make it an appropriate medium for promoting giftedness for all South African pupils. Finally, it is argued that intelligence and genius should be viewed, not as personal capacities, nor as social constructs but metaphysically as a function of gathering complexity.
3

The role of mentorship in enhancing academic proficiency : Motivational dispostion and learning satisfaction in academically gifted children

Simpson, Brenda Gladys Huldis 05 1900 (has links)
According to research, the academically gifted child may not have his/her educational needs met in a classroom with his/her age mates. This study was an investigation of the impact of mentorship on academically gifted students in an attempt to adjust curriculum to reflect what the identified gifted child i s ready to learn. There is little theoretically-based research on the impact of mentorship on children with advanced academic capabilities. It was hypothesized that academically gifted students who received individualized instruction from a mentor would show positive changes i n motivation and that this teaching approach would further enhance their academic proficiency. Learning satisfaction would also be a result of participation in a mentorship program. A multi-case study methodology was employed, including four identified gifted students. Replication of results across cases illustrates an overall improvement in academic competency and motivation. The children involved learned a great deal, evolved as motivated students and had a noticeable sense of satisfaction from participating in the program. Conclusions justify the need for curriculum modification for academically advanced children.
4

The role of mentorship in enhancing academic proficiency : Motivational dispostion and learning satisfaction in academically gifted children

Simpson, Brenda Gladys Huldis 05 1900 (has links)
According to research, the academically gifted child may not have his/her educational needs met in a classroom with his/her age mates. This study was an investigation of the impact of mentorship on academically gifted students in an attempt to adjust curriculum to reflect what the identified gifted child i s ready to learn. There is little theoretically-based research on the impact of mentorship on children with advanced academic capabilities. It was hypothesized that academically gifted students who received individualized instruction from a mentor would show positive changes i n motivation and that this teaching approach would further enhance their academic proficiency. Learning satisfaction would also be a result of participation in a mentorship program. A multi-case study methodology was employed, including four identified gifted students. Replication of results across cases illustrates an overall improvement in academic competency and motivation. The children involved learned a great deal, evolved as motivated students and had a noticeable sense of satisfaction from participating in the program. Conclusions justify the need for curriculum modification for academically advanced children. / Education, Faculty of / Curriculum and Pedagogy (EDCP), Department of / Graduate
5

The particular value of mentorships for gifted students /

Casey, Kerry M. A. January 1997 (has links)
The claim that mentorships are particularly appropriate and in some ways unique educational experiences for high ability students was empirically tested. Students who had and had not taken part in a gifted, creative, or enrichment program (n = 39) completed a questionnaire that consisted of scenarios and statements addressing mentees' vocational and psychosocial needs. Of particular interest were the factor analyses generated from students' responses to the direct statements. As predicted, the high ability group preferred mentorships addressing psychosocial needs to those addressing vocational ones. All five psychosocial items loaded on factor 1, while nine of the 11 vocational items loaded on factor 2. For students who had not participated in a program for high ability pupils, a combination of vocational and psychosocial items loaded on factors 1 and 2. This suggested that these students shared a more general preference for mentoring relationships regardless of whether they addressed vocational or psychosocial needs.
6

Gifted dropouts a phenomenological study /

Zabloski, James. January 2010 (has links)
Thesis (D.Min.)--Liberty University, 2010. / Includes bibliographical references.
7

The College Experience of Gifted Emerging Adults: Factors Associated to Social Adjustment to College

Unknown Date (has links)
The purpose of the present study was to investigate factors that contribute to the social adjustment to college for gifted emerging adults. Specifically, perceived parental attachment, and social competence were included. Additionally, social competence was examined to determine if it served as a mediator between parental attachment and social adjustment to college. Results from bivariate correlations and multiple regression analyses revealed positive, significant correlations between parental attachment and social adjustment to college, parental attachment and social competence, and social competence and social adjustment to college. Analyses also found that social competence partially mediated the relationship between parental attachment and social adjustment to college. Limitations, implications, and future research directions were discussed. The majority of research regarding gifted individuals focuses on the experience and developmental domains within the K-12 setting. The findings of the present study add to the significant dearth of literature concerning the college experience of gifted individuals. Specifically, the results provide support that a secure parental attachment influences positive development of social competence and better social adjustment to college in gifted emerging adults. / A Thesis submitted to the Department of Child and Family Sciences in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science. / Summer Semester 2016. / June 16, 2016. / Includes bibliographical references. / Kendal Holtrop, Professor Directing Thesis; Ming Cui, Committee Member; Lenore McWey, Committee Member; Steven Pfeiffer, Committee Member.
8

The particular value of mentorships for gifted students /

Casey, Kerry M. A. January 1997 (has links)
No description available.
9

Gifted and talented program evaluation : the acquisition of research skills in grades 3-8 /

Tamsberg, Merle S. January 1987 (has links)
No description available.
10

Programmes for the gifted child : a critical analysis of existing programmes with some suggestions for the development of programmes for the gifted child in India.

Alleppa, Christine January 1964 (has links)
No description available.

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