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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The effect of calcination conditions on the graphitizability of novel synthetic and coal-derived cokes

Bennett, Barbara, January 2000 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--West Virginia University, 2000. / Title from document title page. Document formatted into pages; contains xviii, 235 p. : ill. (some col.) Vita. Includes abstract. Includes bibliographical references (p. 190-195).
2

The solidification and graphitization of certain cast irons

Loper, Carl R. January 1961 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 196l. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 148-150).
3

Secondary graphitization in quenched and tempered ductile cast iron

Voigt, Robert Carl. January 1981 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1981. / Typescript. Vita. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 231-238).
4

The effect of static and residual stresses on graphitic corrosion

Meletis, Efstathios Ioannis 05 1900 (has links)
No description available.
5

Effect of graphitization on the static mechanical properties of service exposed ASTM A516 Gr. 65 steam pipe metal

Du Preez, Christiaan January 2017 (has links)
The focus of this research project is to establish what effect graphitization has on the static mechanical properties of service exposed ASTM A516 Grade 65 steam pipe material, which operated for prolonged periods above 425 ̊C. The research study was conducted on three graphitized service exposed steam pipe weldment samples and on a newly welded and post weld heat treated sample with graphitized service exposed steam pipe material. Macro samples were removed from each of the samples at two positions and these were evaluated with regard to graphite nodule size, nearest neighbour spacing and % planar graphitization in the parent pipe and HAZ regions on either side of the welds. It was found on all of the service exposed samples that the graphite nodules of the HAZ regions have a smaller median nodule size, smaller median nearest neighbour spacing and increased % planar graphitization in comparison to the parent pipe material. The service expose parent pipe material on either side of the weldments of the respective samples was chemically analyzed. This was done with the focus being on the deoxidizing element content (Si and Al) of the respective parent pipe regions and to what extent these elements influenced the development of planar graphitization in these regions. No correlation could be identified between the level of deoxidizing elements and the levels of % planar graphitization in the parent pipe material. Tensile and Charpy impact samples were removed from the respective service exposed samples parent material on either side of the weld and from the HAZ regions on the side with the highest levels of planar graphitization. These samples were tested and the yield and ultimate tensile strength and Charpy impact toughness of the respective samples were then evaluated to establish how these static mechanical properties were influenced by the % planar graphitization. The yield and ultimate tensile strength of the service exposed material did not show a statistically significant correlation with the % planar graphitization. The Charpy impact toughness results did however show a statistically significant negative correlation towards the % planar graphitization. This was clearly evident from the results of the HAZ regions of the service exposed weldments (Samples A-C) which had the highest levels of % planar graphitization and the lowest impact toughness, while the newly welded and post weld heat treated Sample D had no planar graphitization outside the HAZ and the highest impact toughness. This research project not only investigated how planar graphitization affects the static mechanical properties of service exposed pipe material, it also investigated on a microstructural basis, how planar graphitization nucleates and grows. The microstructural investigation showed that the free carbon required for the development of planar graphitization originated from the regions outside the HAZ, which were formed when the pearlite bands were dissolved during the welding of the steam pipe. The heat input from the welding sensitized this region for the development of planar graphitization, probably due to the formation of a “carbon-rich” matrix due to the partial dissolution of the cementite precipitates. All the carbide precipitates in this region consisted of M3C. aluminium-rich precipitates were found inside newly nucleated graphite nodules, indicating its role as a possible heterogeneous nucleation site. Growth of newly formed graphite nodules showed a preference towards high-angle grain boundaries and regions with dislocations for the initial growth stages of the graphite nodules. The microstructure of the region outside the HAZ of the newly introduced seam weld on the service exposed steam pipe material (with graphitization), was also investigated using advanced electron microscopy methods and it yielded no evidence of the development of planar graphitization.
6

Preparation and characterisation of graphitisable carbon from coal solution

Kgobane, Bethuel Lesole. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)(Chemistry)--University of Pretoria, 2007. / Includes summary. Includes bibliographical references. Available on the Internet via the World Wide Web.
7

Microstructural transitions in directionally solidified graphitic cast irons

Argo, Donald. January 1985 (has links)
No description available.
8

Catalytic graphitisation of refcoal cokes

Nyathi, Mhlwazi Solomon January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (MSc.(Chemistry))--University of Pretoria, 2008. / Includes bibliographical references.
9

Microstructural transitions in directionally solidified graphitic cast irons

Argo, Donald January 1985 (has links)
No description available.
10

Effects of the chemical composition of coal tar pitch on dimensional changes during graphitization / Lay Shoko

Shoko, Lay January 2014 (has links)
Coal can be converted to different chemical products through processes such destructive distillation. The destructive distillation of coal yields coke as the main product with byproducts such as coal tar pitch (CTP). CTP has a wide range of applications, especially in the carbon-processing industries. Typical applications include the manufacture of anodes used in many electrochemical processes, as well as Söderberg electrodes used in different ferroalloy processes. Söderberg electrodes are made from the thermal treatment of Söderberg electrode paste. The Söderberg electrode paste is a mixture of CTP (binding material) and coke/calcined anthracite (filler). Söderberg electrodes are characterised by a baking isotherm temperature. This temperature is located in the baking zone of the Söderberg electrode system. In the baking zone, the liquid paste is transformed into a solid carbonaceous material. Knowing the baking isotherm temperature is essential as it will ensure the safe, profitable and continuous operation of submerged arc furnaces. Thermomechanical analysis (TMA) was used in this study to determine the baking isotherm temperature of CTP samples. The baking isotherm temperature for all samples was found to lie between 450 and 475 °C irrespective of the initial chemical and physical composition of the CTP. TMA was also used to measure the dimensional changes that take place in the binding material (CTP) at temperatures above the baking isotherm. The dimensional changes of 12 CTP samples when heated from room temperature up to a maximum of 1300 °C were measured. The results indicated that all CTP samples shrank by approximately 14% in the first heating and cooling cycle. The second and third heating and cooling cycles gave a small change in dimensions of approximately 2% for all samples. The significant change in dimensions observed for all CTP samples during the first TMA thermal treatment cycle was attributed to the structural rearrangement that takes place within the carbonaceous material. The structural ordering of all CTP samples thermally treated was evaluated by X-ray diffractometry (XRD). XRD is widely used in the determination of crystallinity/amorphousness of carbonaceous materials, interlayer distance (d-spacing), as well as the degree of ordering (DOG) in a given material. For comparison of structural ordering, XRD analysis was also performed on raw (as-received) CTPs, as well as CTPs thermally treated at 475 and 1300 °C. Prebaked electrode graphite was also analysed. From the XRD results, raw CTP was found to be amorphous with no significant ordering. The interlayer spacing (d002) for all raw CTP samples averaged 3.70 Å, compared to 3.37 Å for prebaked electrode graphite. CTPs thermally treated at 1300 °C had a d-spacing of 3.51 Å. The DOG of raw samples was found to be negative which was indicative of the amorphousness of the raw CTP. The DOG increased with an increase in thermal treatment temperature, as was seen from the DOG of CTPs thermally treated at 1300 °C, which was calculated to be approximately -81% for all 12 samples. The calculated DOG for prebaked electrode graphite was 81%. Prior to determining the baking isotherm temperature, as well as the changes in dimensions during thermal treatment, the chemical compositions of the 12 CTP samples were determined. In the chemical composition determination, fundamental properties such as softening point (SP), coking value (CV), toluene and quinoline insolubles (TI and QI, respectively) were evaluated. This was in addition to proximate and ultimate analysis. The information obtained from this diverse characterisation showed significant differences in the chemical composition of the 12 CTPs. By making use of multi-linear regression analysis (MLR), it was possible to predict or calculate less commonly determined characteristics (CV, TI and QI) from the more commonly obtained parameters (proximate and ultimate analysis parameters). It was found that MLR could be used successfully to calculate CV and TI, but less so for QI. Additional chemical composition of CTP was determined by analytical techniques such as Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Results from the FT-IR analysis showed that the spectra for all 12 raw CTPs were similar, with differences only being in the FT-IR band intensities. The differences in FT-IR band intensities were supported by NMR analysis data, which gave quantitative information on the different structural parameters found in all CTPs. The structural composition of CTPs changed during thermal treatment, as was shown by the FT-IR analysis performed on raw CTPs samples, CTPs thermally treated at 475, 700, 1000 and 1300 °C, as well as prebaked electrode graphite. / PhD (Chemistry), North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2014

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