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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Physical activity levels among people living with HIV/AIDS treated with high active antiretroviral therapy in Rwanda

Murenzi, Augustin January 2011 (has links)
<p>The use of high active antiretroviral therapy in people living with HIV/AIDS is increasing worldwide. In Rwanda, above 70 % of people in need of antiretroviral therapies is getting them. This drug therapy is associated with abnormal fat redistribution and metabolic complications which increase the risks of cardiovascular and diabetes diseases among these patients. The best recommended preventive and treating modality for these complications is physical activity participation. Despite this recommendation, there is lack of information about physical activity in HIV individuals under high active antiretroviral therapy. The current study aims to determine physical activity levels among people living with HIV treated with high active antiretroviral therapy in Kigali, Rwanda. A cross-sectional design using quantitative method was used. The participant&rsquo / s levels of physical activity participation and their association with anthropometric profiles were measured, using a structured self-administered questionnaire adapted from the Sub-Saharan Africa Activity Questionnaire. Based on a scientific calculation, 407 clients passing through the clinics were included in the study. A convenient sample of people attending the clinics approached to participate voluntarily in the study. The statistical package for social sciences version 19.0 and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Inferential statistics like Chi-square test was used to determine the associations between physical activity levels and anthropometric profiles (p&lt / 0.05). Of the participants, 77% were female with a mean age of 38.82 years (SD=8.9. According to body mass index and weight hip ration, approximately 40% and 43% were obese and overweight respectively. Obesity was more common amongst the females (45%). The study found a high prevalence of inactivity in the following activities, of leisure-time (82.6%), household (71%), walking to/from work (61.7%) and work related physical activities (75%). Obesity was found to be strongly associated with inactivity in all types of activity. The findings of the current study highlighted the lack of motivation, lack of time and fear of worsening the disease amongst the strong barriers to physical activity participation. The current study recommends education about the benefits of physical activity participation and encouragement of patient treated with high active antiretroviral therapy in Rwanda to be emphasized on to improve their lives.</p>
2

Physical activity levels among people living with HIV/AIDS treated with high active antiretroviral therapy in Rwanda

Murenzi, Augustin January 2011 (has links)
<p>The use of high active antiretroviral therapy in people living with HIV/AIDS is increasing worldwide. In Rwanda, above 70 % of people in need of antiretroviral therapies is getting them. This drug therapy is associated with abnormal fat redistribution and metabolic complications which increase the risks of cardiovascular and diabetes diseases among these patients. The best recommended preventive and treating modality for these complications is physical activity participation. Despite this recommendation, there is lack of information about physical activity in HIV individuals under high active antiretroviral therapy. The current study aims to determine physical activity levels among people living with HIV treated with high active antiretroviral therapy in Kigali, Rwanda. A cross-sectional design using quantitative method was used. The participant&rsquo / s levels of physical activity participation and their association with anthropometric profiles were measured, using a structured self-administered questionnaire adapted from the Sub-Saharan Africa Activity Questionnaire. Based on a scientific calculation, 407 clients passing through the clinics were included in the study. A convenient sample of people attending the clinics approached to participate voluntarily in the study. The statistical package for social sciences version 19.0 and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Inferential statistics like Chi-square test was used to determine the associations between physical activity levels and anthropometric profiles (p&lt / 0.05). Of the participants, 77% were female with a mean age of 38.82 years (SD=8.9. According to body mass index and weight hip ration, approximately 40% and 43% were obese and overweight respectively. Obesity was more common amongst the females (45%). The study found a high prevalence of inactivity in the following activities, of leisure-time (82.6%), household (71%), walking to/from work (61.7%) and work related physical activities (75%). Obesity was found to be strongly associated with inactivity in all types of activity. The findings of the current study highlighted the lack of motivation, lack of time and fear of worsening the disease amongst the strong barriers to physical activity participation. The current study recommends education about the benefits of physical activity participation and encouragement of patient treated with high active antiretroviral therapy in Rwanda to be emphasized on to improve their lives.</p>
3

An exploration of the challenges of grandparenting in HIV/AIDS affected families in Zambia

Phiri, Jackson F. 05 April 2011 (has links)
HIV/AIDS, discovered in the early 1980s, has now become a world-wide epidemic. The most affected area is Africa, in particular sub-Saharan Africa. This exploratory research project examined the challenges facing grandmothers and focused on Zambia because with 1,291,079 orphans, Zambia has the highest proportions of orphans in the world. Evidence demonstrates that grandmothers care for approximately 43% of the 845,546 AIDS orphans. Young men and women aged between 15 and 49, despite good health and higher education, have continued to die from AIDS, leaving behind children who are cared for by their grandparents and in particular their grandmothers. The experiences of these grandmothers are not known due to a paucity of studies on the subject. This study is a scoping review of literature on HIV/AIDS in Zambia and its impact on the family. A number of journals, books, and reports were investigated. The major themes arising from the literature were identified and discussed; they include HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa and HIV/AIDS in Zambia, impact of HIV/AIDS on households and Zambia’s response to the epidemic. This research uses three perspectives: conflict theory, social capital and role conflict to guide the exploration of the social impact of HIV/AIDS on families and society. The study provided an opportunity to identify and examine the challenges facing grandmothers who care for their AIDS orphans and consequently to offer potential solutions. It also contributed to a broader understanding of the social significance of HIV/AIDS.
4

An exploration of the challenges of grandparenting in HIV/AIDS affected families in Zambia

Phiri, Jackson F. 05 April 2011 (has links)
HIV/AIDS, discovered in the early 1980s, has now become a world-wide epidemic. The most affected area is Africa, in particular sub-Saharan Africa. This exploratory research project examined the challenges facing grandmothers and focused on Zambia because with 1,291,079 orphans, Zambia has the highest proportions of orphans in the world. Evidence demonstrates that grandmothers care for approximately 43% of the 845,546 AIDS orphans. Young men and women aged between 15 and 49, despite good health and higher education, have continued to die from AIDS, leaving behind children who are cared for by their grandparents and in particular their grandmothers. The experiences of these grandmothers are not known due to a paucity of studies on the subject. This study is a scoping review of literature on HIV/AIDS in Zambia and its impact on the family. A number of journals, books, and reports were investigated. The major themes arising from the literature were identified and discussed; they include HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa and HIV/AIDS in Zambia, impact of HIV/AIDS on households and Zambia’s response to the epidemic. This research uses three perspectives: conflict theory, social capital and role conflict to guide the exploration of the social impact of HIV/AIDS on families and society. The study provided an opportunity to identify and examine the challenges facing grandmothers who care for their AIDS orphans and consequently to offer potential solutions. It also contributed to a broader understanding of the social significance of HIV/AIDS.
5

Physical activity levels among people living with HIV/AIDS treated with high active antiretroviral therapy in Rwanda

Augustin, Murenzi January 2011 (has links)
Magister Scientiae (Physiotherapy) - MSc(Physio) / The use of high active antiretroviral therapy in people living with HIV/AIDS is increasing worldwide. In Rwanda, above 70 % of people in need of antiretroviral therapies is getting them. This drug therapy is associated with abnormal fat redistribution and metabolic complications which increase the risks of cardiovascular and diabetes diseases among these patients. The best recommended preventive and treating modality for these complications is physical activity participation. Despite this recommendation, there is lack of information about physical activity in HIV individuals under high active antiretroviral therapy. The current study aims to determine physical activity levels among people living with HIV treated with high active antiretroviral therapy in Kigali, Rwanda. A cross-sectional design using quantitative method was used. The participant's levels of physical activity participation and their association with anthropometric profiles were measured, using a structured self-administered questionnaire adapted from the Sub-Saharan Africa Activity Questionnaire. Based on a scientific calculation, 407 clients passing through the clinics were included in the study. A convenient sample of people attending the clinics approached to participate voluntarily in the study. The statistical package for social sciences version 19.0 and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Inferential statistics like Chi-square test was used to determine the associations between physical activity levels and anthropometric profiles (p<0.05). Of the participants, 77% were female with a mean age of 38.82 years (SD=8.9. According to body mass index and weight hip ration, approximately 40% and 43% were obese and overweight respectively. Obesity was more common amongst the females (45%). The study found a high prevalence of inactivity in the following activities, of leisure-time (82.6%), household (71%), walking to/from work (61.7%) and work related physical activities (75%). Obesity was found to be strongly associated with inactivity in all types of activity. The findings of the current study highlighted the lack of motivation, lack of time and fear of worsening the disease amongst the strong barriers to physical activity participation. The current study recommends education about the benefits of physical activity participation and encouragement of patient treated with high active antiretroviral therapy in Rwanda to be emphasized on to improve their lives. / South Africa
6

Situating the HIV/AIDS epidemic in a historical context : a case study of orphans in Nguludi Mission Community, Malawi

Croke, Rhian G January 2003 (has links)
Includes bibliography. / This thesis is based on a series of interviews with key informants and a census of orphan households in Nguludi Mission Community, Southern Malawi, in 2000. The thesis argues that although HIV/AIDS is a relatively recent phenomenon, any contemporary understanding of the epidemic must be informed by an understanding of the past. The impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the "orphan problem" at the local level, is, therefore, situated within the broader socio-economic context of the history of the region.
7

Care of children affected and infected by HIV/ AIDS at Khayelihle Childrens Home, Cato Ridge, South Africa

Okello, Tom Were January 2004 (has links)
A dissertation submitted to the Faculty of Arts in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Community Work; in the Departmnet of Social Work, 2004. / In this study the researcher investigated care of children affected and infected by HIV/AIDS at Khayelihle Children's Home. The principal aim of the study was to offer a diagnostic, evaluative assessment of the care for children at Khayelihle Children's Home. Survey methodology was adopted for this research- Stratified sampling technique was used in selecting a sample of the respondents to participate in the study. Three strata of: children: aunts/grandmothers: and the international volunteers were selected from the total population at Khayelihle children's home. Sixty people drawn from the stratas participated in the study. Data was collected by use of structured interviews. Documentary sources and observations were utilised as complementary methods to data collection. Data collected was analysed using descriptive analysis. Tables and pie - charts were used to enter specific types of data and show-relationships between variables. The findings from the study indicated that the care of children at Khayelihle Children's Hume was not effective. Several reasons are advanced for this phenomenon. These include: inability to protect children from exploitation, abuse, and neglect: inability of fostering the development of a close and secure relationship with caregiver- as well as allowing a close relationship with the remaining family members. Other reasons include: little emphasis in helping children understand the imminent death of a parent: their identity; uniqueness and a sense of personal continuity especially in the maintenance of a close link with the cultural community: and failure in encouraging children expression of emotions a prerequisite for psychosocial development. It was concluded that the care for children at Khayelihle children's needed to promote psychosocial development and resilience in children for them to be able to deal with the imminent challenges of life as orphans in the face of HIWAIDS epidemic. The study recommends that, the care (or children at Khayelihle should put in perspective the underlying values advocated by the Convention on the Rights of the Child, which should serve as a constant reference for die implementing and monitoring all efforts to care, promote, fulfil and protect children's right-.
8

Living With HIV/AIDS: a gay man's autoethnography

Wallace, Brick 11 1900 (has links)
In Canada, queer men (or ‘men who have sex with men’) continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS, representing at least 50% of all people living with HIV/AIDS (Public Health Agency of Canada, 2012). Every year, thousands of new infections significantly increase the toll that HIV/AIDS takes on queer men and their communities. With this epidemiological reality as context, I set out to explore how my subjectivity (as a gay, HIV-positive man) was and is shaped, specifically with respect to the following HIV/AIDS-related, socio-cultural phenomena: activism, community service, ‘safer’ sex, diagnosis and criminalization. These five phenomena provide focal points (or themes) for the presentation and analysis of my experience of living with HIV/AIDS, both before and after becoming infected. Through insider knowledge, my research examines three decades of personal stories, using critical reflexivity to increase my awareness (as well as my reader’s) of the myriad challenges and complexities of living one’s life in the midst of the ongoing pandemic. / Thesis / Master of Social Welfare (MSW)
9

A survey of students' knowledge behaviour and resultant attitudes towards HIV/AIDS

Partington, Kathryn January 2003 (has links)
Dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology at the University of Zululand, South Africa, 2003. / The study investigated student behaviour and knowledge related to HIV/AiDS on the University of Zuluiand campus. Because of the social and economic conditions that exist in the country today such research is seen as both urgent and pertinent it is hoped that the study will add to the knowledge base generated by other studies conducted at tertiary institutions throughout South Africa. The study had certain assumptions, which have been supported by the results of the survey, it was postulated that women students wouid be more conservative in sexual behaviour than mate students and that femaies would be more accepting and empathetic towards People living with HiV/AIDS (PLWHA). The study also predicted that there wouid be a segment of the student population who would reveal a dissonance between attitudes, knowledge and behaviours and also that a proportion of students of both sexes would reveal significant gaps in their knowledge about how HIV/AIDS is transmitted. These predictions are underpinned by the results and discussion thereof, which places them within the context of early 21st century South African society.
10

An Evaluation of the HIV/AIDS Awareness at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

Pugliese, Leanna January 2006 (has links)
Class of 2006 Abstract / Objectives: The HIV/AIDS Awareness series aims to broaden the College of Pharmacy’s impact and service to the community by educating and increasing awareness about the many facets of HIV/AIDS not only locally, but also globally. Our innovative educational series entitled “AIDS Awareness Week,” will enable many students and faculty to come together to learn in a community forum setting. Our purpose is to describe the general activities included in the Week, as well as to describe the general reaction to the program. Methods: A questionnaire was developed and administered every day of the week long series from November 28 – December 1 2005 at the University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy. Results: Data was utilized for a total of 222 participants to the 2005 AIDS Awareness Week educational series. Of the 222, 41.4% (n=92) were male, and 59% (n=130) were female. The following faculties were represented during the week; College of Pharmacy 72.5% (n=161), the College of Nursing 14% (n=30), the College of Medicine 7.2% (n=16), the College of Public Health 1.4% (n=3), and those from “other” programs at 1.4% (n=3). Of those in attendance, 94% (n=209) were students, 2.3% (n=5) were faculty, 2.3% (n=5) fell into the “other” category, and 1.4% (n=3) were health professionals. Of significance was the number of “return” participants to the different 2005 educational series. The number of “return participants” was as follows: On day 2, 63.3% (n=38) of the 60 in attendance had been to the previous day. On day 3, 48% (n=30) of 63 participants had been to Day 1, and 62% (n=39) had also attended Day 2. On Day 4, 52% (n=26) of the 50 in attendance had attended Day1, 58% (n=29) for Day 2, and 44% (n=22) for Day 3. Implications: Overall, the series went very well and attendance was high. Positive feedback regarding the events was taken via anecdotal comments and that people returned to each session. This program is easily duplicated and can be used as a template in any university setting to promote awareness of sensitive subjects as well as foster community learning and relationships between the professions. It is hoped that this educational series will aid in bridging the gap within healthcare professionals, as well as provide an open forum for students from different backgrounds to come and learn the information together.

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