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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Haptic controls in cars for safer driving

Asif, Fayez 01 June 2011 (has links)
With the spread of latest state of the art technologies geared towards utilization of the human senses, haptic technologies have been introduced as a way of utilising the sense of touch to either solve real world problems or to enhance present experiences. This thesis focuses on using haptic technology in cars to make the driving experience safer. Modern vehicles carry GPS, music systems, sunroofs and a number of other electronic gadgets. Interaction with these devices while driving often takes the driver‘s eyes ―off the road‖ and raises safety concerns. We are proposing a unique haptic design that uses the ‗sense of touch‘ as a mode of controlling or coordinating the various technologies and convenience devices found within a car. A pattern of distinguishable haptic feedback linked to a corresponding device allows the user to operate these devices through ‗sense of touch‘ and eliminates reliance on visual interaction. This design will help to reduce the driver‘s distractions, as it will be installed in an easily accessible location such as on the steering wheel. A simulation has been done using a haptic interface ―i.e. desktop phantom to test the system‖ and a prototype has been developed which can be installed in any vehicle. This prototype has been tested to work with a limited number of convenient devices. However, further development and enhancements can be made to incorporate more devices and other user preferences. The main objective of this research is to integrate various functionalities in a robust manner, which will focus on the driver‘s safety by ensuring ―constant vision on the road‖. Distinguishable distinct haptic responses will act as unique depictions for specific convenient devices within the car, allowing the driver to interact and manipulate the settings of the device based on the detection and identification of the various unique haptic depictions. / UOIT
2

Extension – Operator Environment for ForestHarvesters / Extension – Operatörsmiljö för Skogsskördare

Mellberg, Anders January 2013 (has links)
A forest harvester operator is today facing a stressful work environment with a high demand on coordination skills and effectiveness to run the operation with positive economical outcome. The learning phase is very long compared to similar work.The vision for this project was to transform the machine, through intuitive and innovative interface design, into an extension of the operator’s body. In this way it provides higher productivity as well as user friendliness, shorter learning phase and a healthier work situation.This was realized through the use of prior but yet not market available related research. Through market studies, applicable technology already available in other industries was found. The result is a complete seat with controls for a conceptual Gremo harvester realizable in the year 2023.
3

Smart Clothes as a Tangible User Interface to Affect Human Emotions using Haptic Actuators

Arafsha, Faisal 20 January 2012 (has links)
Affective haptic research is a rapidly growing field. Today, more smart haptic clothes are being studied and implemented which are aimed to effect its users emotionally. However, they have some limitations. This research intends to improve the existing literature and contribute by involving consumers directly in the design of a smart haptic jacket by adding heat, vibration actuators, and by enhancing portability. In this thesis, we are interested in six basic emotions: love, joy, surprise, anger, sadness, and fear. An online survey was designed and conducted on 92 respondents that gave feedback of what it is expected from an affective haptic jacket. The results of this survey assisted in the general design, and the feedback helped to build a prototype. 86% of the respondents expressed interest in the system and are willing to try it when it is ready. A detailed design architecture is provided along with details on the hardware and software used for the implementation. Finally, the prototype was evaluated on 14 participants using the actual prototype haptic jacket based on a QoE comparison between the absence and the presence of haptic actuation. The proposed system showed improvement over a similar system that is designed for the same purpose.
4

Development of a Sensory Feedback System for Lower-limb Amputees using Vibrotactile Haptics

Sharma, Aman 28 November 2013 (has links)
Following lower-limb amputation, patients suffer from sensory loss within the prosthesis/residuum complex leading to diminished proprioception and balance. Artificial sensory systems have the potential to improve rehabilitation outcomes including better functional usage of lower-limb prostheses to achieve a higher quality of life for the prosthetic users. The purpose of this work was to develop and test the e fficacy of a vibrotactile feedback system for lower-limb amputees that may augment feedback during complex balance and movement tasks. Responses to different vibrotactile stimuli frequencies, locations, and physical conditions were assessed. Key outcome measures for this work were the response time and response accuracy of the subjects to the different stimulator configurations. Frequencies closer to 250 Hz applied to the anterior portion of the thigh resulted in the quickest reaction times. When multitasking, reaction times increased. These preliminary results indicate that vibrotactile sensory feedback may be viable to use by lower-limb amputees.
5

Development of a Sensory Feedback System for Lower-limb Amputees using Vibrotactile Haptics

Sharma, Aman 28 November 2013 (has links)
Following lower-limb amputation, patients suffer from sensory loss within the prosthesis/residuum complex leading to diminished proprioception and balance. Artificial sensory systems have the potential to improve rehabilitation outcomes including better functional usage of lower-limb prostheses to achieve a higher quality of life for the prosthetic users. The purpose of this work was to develop and test the e fficacy of a vibrotactile feedback system for lower-limb amputees that may augment feedback during complex balance and movement tasks. Responses to different vibrotactile stimuli frequencies, locations, and physical conditions were assessed. Key outcome measures for this work were the response time and response accuracy of the subjects to the different stimulator configurations. Frequencies closer to 250 Hz applied to the anterior portion of the thigh resulted in the quickest reaction times. When multitasking, reaction times increased. These preliminary results indicate that vibrotactile sensory feedback may be viable to use by lower-limb amputees.
6

Smart Clothes as a Tangible User Interface to Affect Human Emotions using Haptic Actuators

Arafsha, Faisal 20 January 2012 (has links)
Affective haptic research is a rapidly growing field. Today, more smart haptic clothes are being studied and implemented which are aimed to effect its users emotionally. However, they have some limitations. This research intends to improve the existing literature and contribute by involving consumers directly in the design of a smart haptic jacket by adding heat, vibration actuators, and by enhancing portability. In this thesis, we are interested in six basic emotions: love, joy, surprise, anger, sadness, and fear. An online survey was designed and conducted on 92 respondents that gave feedback of what it is expected from an affective haptic jacket. The results of this survey assisted in the general design, and the feedback helped to build a prototype. 86% of the respondents expressed interest in the system and are willing to try it when it is ready. A detailed design architecture is provided along with details on the hardware and software used for the implementation. Finally, the prototype was evaluated on 14 participants using the actual prototype haptic jacket based on a QoE comparison between the absence and the presence of haptic actuation. The proposed system showed improvement over a similar system that is designed for the same purpose.
7

Smart Clothes as a Tangible User Interface to Affect Human Emotions using Haptic Actuators

Arafsha, Faisal 20 January 2012 (has links)
Affective haptic research is a rapidly growing field. Today, more smart haptic clothes are being studied and implemented which are aimed to effect its users emotionally. However, they have some limitations. This research intends to improve the existing literature and contribute by involving consumers directly in the design of a smart haptic jacket by adding heat, vibration actuators, and by enhancing portability. In this thesis, we are interested in six basic emotions: love, joy, surprise, anger, sadness, and fear. An online survey was designed and conducted on 92 respondents that gave feedback of what it is expected from an affective haptic jacket. The results of this survey assisted in the general design, and the feedback helped to build a prototype. 86% of the respondents expressed interest in the system and are willing to try it when it is ready. A detailed design architecture is provided along with details on the hardware and software used for the implementation. Finally, the prototype was evaluated on 14 participants using the actual prototype haptic jacket based on a QoE comparison between the absence and the presence of haptic actuation. The proposed system showed improvement over a similar system that is designed for the same purpose.
8

Contribution to the study of haptic feedback for improving the audiovisual experience / Contribution à l'étude des retours haptiques pour l'amélioration de l'expérience audiovisuelle

Danieau, Fabien 13 February 2014 (has links)
Les technologies haptiques, stimulant le sens du toucher, sont utilisées depuis des années dans des applications de réalité virtuelle et de téléopération pour accroître l'immersion de l'utilisateur. Elles sont en revanche très peu employées dans les systèmes audiovisuels comme les cinémas. L'objectif de cette thèse est d'exploiter le potentiel des retours haptiques pour les contenus audiovisuels. Dans la première partie de la thèse, nous nous intéressons au rendu d'effets haptiques lors du visionnage d'une vidéo. Nous présentons tout d'abord un appareil générant des sensations de mouvements à 6 degrés de liberté. Au lieu de mettre tout le corps de l'utilisateur en mouvement, comme cela est fait avec les simulateurs de mouvements traditionnels, seulement la tête et les mains sont stimulées. Ce dispositif permet ainsi d'enrichir l'expérience audiovisuelle. Nous nous intéressons ensuite aux algorithmes de rendu d'effets haptiques dans un contexte audiovisuel. La combinaison de retours haptiques et de séquences vidéo amène de nouveaux problèmes lors du rendu haptique. Nous proposons un nouvel algorithme adapté à ce contexte. Dans la seconde partie de la thèse, nous nous concentrons sur la production d'effets haptiques. Premièrement nous présentons un nouvel outil d'édition graphique. Celui-ci propose trois méthodes d'interaction pour créer des effets de mouvement et pour les synchroniser avec une vidéo. De plus, cet outil permet de ressentir les effets créés. Ensuite nous nous penchons sur les combinaisons haptiques et audiovisuelles. Dans une nouvelle approche nommée Cinématographie Haptique, nous explorons le potentiel des effets haptiques pour créer de nouveaux effets dédiés aux réalisateurs de films. / Haptic technology, stimulating the sense of touch, is used for years in virtual reality and teleoperation applications for enhancing the user immersion. Yet it is still underused in audiovisual systems such as movie theaters. The objective of this thesis is thus to exploit the potential of haptics for audiovisual content. In the first part of this Ph.D. thesis, we address the haptic rendering in video viewing context. We first present a new device providing 6 degrees of freedom motion effects. Instead of moving the whole user's body, as it is traditionally done with motion platform, only the head and hands are stimulated. This device allows thus to enrich the audiovisual experience. Then we focus on the haptic rendering of haptic-audiovisuals. The combination of haptic effects and video sequences yields new challenges for the haptic rendering. We introduce a new haptic rendering algorithm to tackle these issues. The second part of this Ph.D. is dedicated to the production of haptic effects. We first present of novel authoring tool. Three editing methods are proposed to create motion effects and to synchronize them to a video. Besides, the tool allows to preview motion effects thanks to a force-feedback device. Then we study combinations of haptic feedback and audiovisual content. In a new approach, the Haptic Cinematography, we explore the potential of haptic effects to create new effects dedicated to movie makers.
9

Smart Clothes as a Tangible User Interface to Affect Human Emotions using Haptic Actuators

Arafsha, Faisal January 2012 (has links)
Affective haptic research is a rapidly growing field. Today, more smart haptic clothes are being studied and implemented which are aimed to effect its users emotionally. However, they have some limitations. This research intends to improve the existing literature and contribute by involving consumers directly in the design of a smart haptic jacket by adding heat, vibration actuators, and by enhancing portability. In this thesis, we are interested in six basic emotions: love, joy, surprise, anger, sadness, and fear. An online survey was designed and conducted on 92 respondents that gave feedback of what it is expected from an affective haptic jacket. The results of this survey assisted in the general design, and the feedback helped to build a prototype. 86% of the respondents expressed interest in the system and are willing to try it when it is ready. A detailed design architecture is provided along with details on the hardware and software used for the implementation. Finally, the prototype was evaluated on 14 participants using the actual prototype haptic jacket based on a QoE comparison between the absence and the presence of haptic actuation. The proposed system showed improvement over a similar system that is designed for the same purpose.
10

New haptic syringe device for virtual angiography training

Huang, D., Tang, P., Wang, X., Wan, Tao Ruan, Tang, W. 01 April 2019 (has links)
No / Angiography is an important minimally invasive diagnostic procedure in endovascular interventions. Effective training for the procedure is expensive, time consuming and resource demanding. Realistic simulation has become a viable solution to addressing such challenges. However, much of previous work has been focused on software issues. In this paper, we present a novel hardware system-an interactive syringe device with haptics as an add-on hardware component to 3D VR angiography training simulator. Connected to a realistic 3D computer simulation environment, the hardware component provides injection haptic feedback effects for medical training. First, we present the design of corresponding novel electronic units consisting of many design modules. Second, we describe a curve fitting method to estimate injection dosage and injection speed of the contrast media based on voltage variation between the potentiometer to increase the realism of the simulated training. A stepper motor control method is developed to imitate the coronary pressure for force feedback of syringe. Experimental results show that the validity and feasibility of the new haptic syringe device for achieving good diffusion effects of contrast media in the simulation system. A user study experiment with medical doctors to assess the efficacy and realism of proposed simulator shows good outcomes. / National Natural Science Foundation of China (61402278), the Innovation Program of the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality of China (16511101302), Research Program of Shanghai Engineering Research Center of Motion Picture Special Effects (16dz2251300)

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