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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Similarity hash based scoring of portable executable files for efficient malware detection in IoT

Namanya, Anitta P., Awan, Irfan U., Disso, J.P., Younas, M. 09 July 2019 (has links)
Yes / The current rise in malicious attacks shows that existing security systems are bypassed by malicious files. Similarity hashing has been adopted for sample triaging in malware analysis and detection. File similarity is used to cluster malware into families such that their common signature can be designed. This paper explores four hash types currently used in malware analysis for portable executable (PE) files. Although each hashing technique produces interesting results, when applied independently, they have high false detection rates. This paper investigates into a central issue of how different hashing techniques can be combined to provide a quantitative malware score and to achieve better detection rates. We design and develop a novel approach for malware scoring based on the hashes results. The proposed approach is evaluated through a number of experiments. Evaluation clearly demonstrates a significant improvement (> 90%) in true detection rates of malware.
2

A heuristic featured based quantification framework for efficient malware detection : measuring the malicious intent of a file using anomaly probabilistic scoring and evidence combinational theory with fuzzy hashing for malware detection in portable executable files

Namanya, Anitta P. January 2016 (has links)
Malware is still one of the most prominent vectors through which computer networks and systems are compromised. A compromised computer system or network provides data and or processing resources to the world of cybercrime. With cybercrime projected to cost the world $6 trillion by 2021, malware is expected to continue being a growing challenge. Statistics around malware growth over the last decade support this theory as malware numbers enjoy almost an exponential increase over the period. Recent reports on the complexity of the malware show that the fight against malware as a means of building more resilient cyberspace is an evolving challenge. Compounding the problem is the lack of cyber security expertise to handle the expected rise in incidents. This thesis proposes advancing automation of the malware static analysis and detection to improve the decision-making confidence levels of a standard computer user in regards to a file’s malicious status. Therefore, this work introduces a framework that relies on two novel approaches to score the malicious intent of a file. The first approach attaches a probabilistic score to heuristic anomalies to calculate an overall file malicious score while the second approach uses fuzzy hashes and evidence combination theory for more efficient malware detection. The approaches’ resultant quantifiable scores measure the malicious intent of the file. The designed schemes were validated using a dataset of “clean” and “malicious” files. The results obtained show that the framework achieves true positive – false positive detection rate “trade-offs” for efficient malware detection.
3

A Heuristic Featured Based Quantification Framework for Efficient Malware Detection. Measuring the Malicious intent of a file using anomaly probabilistic scoring and evidence combinational theory with fuzzy hashing for malware detection in Portable Executable files

Namanya, Anitta P. January 2016 (has links)
Malware is still one of the most prominent vectors through which computer networks and systems are compromised. A compromised computer system or network provides data and or processing resources to the world of cybercrime. With cybercrime projected to cost the world $6 trillion by 2021, malware is expected to continue being a growing challenge. Statistics around malware growth over the last decade support this theory as malware numbers enjoy almost an exponential increase over the period. Recent reports on the complexity of the malware show that the fight against malware as a means of building more resilient cyberspace is an evolving challenge. Compounding the problem is the lack of cyber security expertise to handle the expected rise in incidents. This thesis proposes advancing automation of the malware static analysis and detection to improve the decision-making confidence levels of a standard computer user in regards to a file’s malicious status. Therefore, this work introduces a framework that relies on two novel approaches to score the malicious intent of a file. The first approach attaches a probabilistic score to heuristic anomalies to calculate an overall file malicious score while the second approach uses fuzzy hashes and evidence combination theory for more efficient malware detection. The approaches’ resultant quantifiable scores measure the malicious intent of the file. The designed schemes were validated using a dataset of “clean” and “malicious” files. The results obtained show that the framework achieves true positive – false positive detection rate “trade-offs” for efficient malware detection.

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