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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Implicit and explicit attitudes of health care workers and their injecting drug using clients with hepatitis C: is this related to treatment experiences?

Brener, Loren, Psychology, Faculty of Science, UNSW January 2007 (has links)
People with hepatitis C (HCV) face stigma and discrimination because of the association of this disease with injecting drug use (IDU). Research has found that many instances of HCV-related discrimination occur in the health care sector. Health care workers' beliefs about their HCV positive clients are likely to influence how they relate to clients and their treatment delivery. This research assessed the implicit and explicit attitudes of both health care workers and their HCV positive injecting drug using (HCV+) clients toward each other and then established whether these affect the treatment experiences of health care workers and clients. The sample consisted of 60 health care workers (doctors and nurses), 120 HCV+ and 120 HCV- clients, recruited from the same treatment facility. Participants were given a series of attitude and treatment experiences measures to complete. Data illustrate that while health care workers' and HCV+ clients' explicit attitudes towards each other were positive, clients with HCV still rated their health care workers less highly and reported less satisfaction with their treatment than HCV- clients. Analyses also indicated that more conservative health care workers displayed greater prejudice toward their HCV+ clients because they believe that injecting drug use is controllable. This prejudice toward IDUs on the part of health care workers was associated with worry about the behaviour of IDU clients and this worry in turn predicted differences in treatment experiences reported by HCV+ and HCV- clients. These data support the contention that health care worker concerns, particularly those related to injecting drug use, underlie discriminatory treatment of people with HCV. Finally the research also addressed the impact of health care worker contact with HCV+ clients on their attitudes towards this group. Analysis revealed that while health care workers who have had more contact with people with HCV show more positive explicit attitudes, they also show less favourable implicit attitudes toward IDUs. This may reflect the difficulties and stresses associated in caring for IDUs and may provide insight into the hidden costs involved for health care workers working with a population that may be challenging and at times difficult to manage.
2

Implicit and explicit attitudes of health care workers and their injecting drug using clients with hepatitis C: is this related to treatment experiences?

Brener, Loren, Psychology, Faculty of Science, UNSW January 2007 (has links)
People with hepatitis C (HCV) face stigma and discrimination because of the association of this disease with injecting drug use (IDU). Research has found that many instances of HCV-related discrimination occur in the health care sector. Health care workers' beliefs about their HCV positive clients are likely to influence how they relate to clients and their treatment delivery. This research assessed the implicit and explicit attitudes of both health care workers and their HCV positive injecting drug using (HCV+) clients toward each other and then established whether these affect the treatment experiences of health care workers and clients. The sample consisted of 60 health care workers (doctors and nurses), 120 HCV+ and 120 HCV- clients, recruited from the same treatment facility. Participants were given a series of attitude and treatment experiences measures to complete. Data illustrate that while health care workers' and HCV+ clients' explicit attitudes towards each other were positive, clients with HCV still rated their health care workers less highly and reported less satisfaction with their treatment than HCV- clients. Analyses also indicated that more conservative health care workers displayed greater prejudice toward their HCV+ clients because they believe that injecting drug use is controllable. This prejudice toward IDUs on the part of health care workers was associated with worry about the behaviour of IDU clients and this worry in turn predicted differences in treatment experiences reported by HCV+ and HCV- clients. These data support the contention that health care worker concerns, particularly those related to injecting drug use, underlie discriminatory treatment of people with HCV. Finally the research also addressed the impact of health care worker contact with HCV+ clients on their attitudes towards this group. Analysis revealed that while health care workers who have had more contact with people with HCV show more positive explicit attitudes, they also show less favourable implicit attitudes toward IDUs. This may reflect the difficulties and stresses associated in caring for IDUs and may provide insight into the hidden costs involved for health care workers working with a population that may be challenging and at times difficult to manage.
3

"More than a liver" - the role of the social work practitioner in hepatitis C treatment centres

Mouton, Marlize, National Centre in HIV Social Research, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW January 2008 (has links)
Hepatitis C is a fast growing infectious disease in Australia and is often associated with related psycho-social and mental health problems. The conventional treatment process for hepatitis C is challenging due to a number of reasons. This study explored social workers’ perceptions of the contribution of their role in hepatitis C treatment centres in relation to the treatment experience of patients. The roles that social workers fulfill, their contribution to the multidisciplinary team and towards a culturally competent service, were explored. Furthermore the knowledge, skills and values required for providing a competent service in a hepatitis C treatment setting was explored. The broad theoretical frameworks that inform social work practice were considered, especially the biopsycho-social model, the strengths perspective, the critically reflexive approach and communications theory. This qualitative study used a semi-structured interview method for data collection. Ten social workers in hepatitis C treatment clinics participated in the study. The findings highlight the needs of patients and how social worker participants described helping to address and meet these needs by employing their knowledge, skills and values through their social work roles and interventions in a team context in a multicultural and multi-faceted work environment. A major challenge that social workers described was to keep patients on treatment despite debilitating side effects that diminish patients' motivation to complete treatment. A shortcoming in the service was described to be the limited psychiatric support available at many treatment centres. The findings lead to a number of recommendations to improve social work services in hepatitis C treatment settings. More research was recommended in areas such as motivational techniques, psychiatric support, and effective group work strategies. The need for increased funding for social work positions in the hepatitis C field was also highlighted. It is anticipated that findings of this study can be applied to hepatitis C treatment in broader settings such as prisons, drug and alcohol settings and general practice. This research will contribute to literature in the field of hepatitis C treatment models and in the field of social work practice in hepatitis C contexts.
4

"More than a liver" - the role of the social work practitioner in hepatitis C treatment centres

Mouton, Marlize, National Centre in HIV Social Research, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW January 2008 (has links)
Hepatitis C is a fast growing infectious disease in Australia and is often associated with related psycho-social and mental health problems. The conventional treatment process for hepatitis C is challenging due to a number of reasons. This study explored social workers’ perceptions of the contribution of their role in hepatitis C treatment centres in relation to the treatment experience of patients. The roles that social workers fulfill, their contribution to the multidisciplinary team and towards a culturally competent service, were explored. Furthermore the knowledge, skills and values required for providing a competent service in a hepatitis C treatment setting was explored. The broad theoretical frameworks that inform social work practice were considered, especially the biopsycho-social model, the strengths perspective, the critically reflexive approach and communications theory. This qualitative study used a semi-structured interview method for data collection. Ten social workers in hepatitis C treatment clinics participated in the study. The findings highlight the needs of patients and how social worker participants described helping to address and meet these needs by employing their knowledge, skills and values through their social work roles and interventions in a team context in a multicultural and multi-faceted work environment. A major challenge that social workers described was to keep patients on treatment despite debilitating side effects that diminish patients' motivation to complete treatment. A shortcoming in the service was described to be the limited psychiatric support available at many treatment centres. The findings lead to a number of recommendations to improve social work services in hepatitis C treatment settings. More research was recommended in areas such as motivational techniques, psychiatric support, and effective group work strategies. The need for increased funding for social work positions in the hepatitis C field was also highlighted. It is anticipated that findings of this study can be applied to hepatitis C treatment in broader settings such as prisons, drug and alcohol settings and general practice. This research will contribute to literature in the field of hepatitis C treatment models and in the field of social work practice in hepatitis C contexts.
5

"More than a liver" - the role of the social work practitioner in hepatitis C treatment centres

Mouton, Marlize, National Centre in HIV Social Research, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW January 2008 (has links)
Hepatitis C is a fast growing infectious disease in Australia and is often associated with related psycho-social and mental health problems. The conventional treatment process for hepatitis C is challenging due to a number of reasons. This study explored social workers’ perceptions of the contribution of their role in hepatitis C treatment centres in relation to the treatment experience of patients. The roles that social workers fulfill, their contribution to the multidisciplinary team and towards a culturally competent service, were explored. Furthermore the knowledge, skills and values required for providing a competent service in a hepatitis C treatment setting was explored. The broad theoretical frameworks that inform social work practice were considered, especially the biopsycho-social model, the strengths perspective, the critically reflexive approach and communications theory. This qualitative study used a semi-structured interview method for data collection. Ten social workers in hepatitis C treatment clinics participated in the study. The findings highlight the needs of patients and how social worker participants described helping to address and meet these needs by employing their knowledge, skills and values through their social work roles and interventions in a team context in a multicultural and multi-faceted work environment. A major challenge that social workers described was to keep patients on treatment despite debilitating side effects that diminish patients' motivation to complete treatment. A shortcoming in the service was described to be the limited psychiatric support available at many treatment centres. The findings lead to a number of recommendations to improve social work services in hepatitis C treatment settings. More research was recommended in areas such as motivational techniques, psychiatric support, and effective group work strategies. The need for increased funding for social work positions in the hepatitis C field was also highlighted. It is anticipated that findings of this study can be applied to hepatitis C treatment in broader settings such as prisons, drug and alcohol settings and general practice. This research will contribute to literature in the field of hepatitis C treatment models and in the field of social work practice in hepatitis C contexts.
6

"More than a liver" - the role of the social work practitioner in hepatitis C treatment centres

Mouton, Marlize, National Centre in HIV Social Research, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW January 2008 (has links)
Hepatitis C is a fast growing infectious disease in Australia and is often associated with related psycho-social and mental health problems. The conventional treatment process for hepatitis C is challenging due to a number of reasons. This study explored social workers’ perceptions of the contribution of their role in hepatitis C treatment centres in relation to the treatment experience of patients. The roles that social workers fulfill, their contribution to the multidisciplinary team and towards a culturally competent service, were explored. Furthermore the knowledge, skills and values required for providing a competent service in a hepatitis C treatment setting was explored. The broad theoretical frameworks that inform social work practice were considered, especially the biopsycho-social model, the strengths perspective, the critically reflexive approach and communications theory. This qualitative study used a semi-structured interview method for data collection. Ten social workers in hepatitis C treatment clinics participated in the study. The findings highlight the needs of patients and how social worker participants described helping to address and meet these needs by employing their knowledge, skills and values through their social work roles and interventions in a team context in a multicultural and multi-faceted work environment. A major challenge that social workers described was to keep patients on treatment despite debilitating side effects that diminish patients' motivation to complete treatment. A shortcoming in the service was described to be the limited psychiatric support available at many treatment centres. The findings lead to a number of recommendations to improve social work services in hepatitis C treatment settings. More research was recommended in areas such as motivational techniques, psychiatric support, and effective group work strategies. The need for increased funding for social work positions in the hepatitis C field was also highlighted. It is anticipated that findings of this study can be applied to hepatitis C treatment in broader settings such as prisons, drug and alcohol settings and general practice. This research will contribute to literature in the field of hepatitis C treatment models and in the field of social work practice in hepatitis C contexts.

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