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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Infant wellbeing : a concept analysis / Eileen Martha Matthews

Matthews, Eileen Martha January 2014 (has links)
Infant care is an essential part of the healthcare industry and an aspect of healthcare where the multi-disciplinary teams work closely together. Within this collaboration of teams, the term "infant wellbeing" is frequently used. Yet even though wellbeing on its own is a multi-faceted concept, when pertaining to the infant, this concept can become very complex and difficult to understand and apply. Dictionary definitions of wellbeing emphasize a state of being healthy, happy or prosperous. However, despite its common-sense appeal, it was found that the term wellbeing is not a particularly well- defined outcome, especially in reference to the infant. Despite the fact that scrutiny of the literature indicated that the term "infant wellbeing" is used by different members of the multi-disciplinary team, a clear concise universal definition for healthcare settings and professionals is missing from published literature. In fact, no recorded definition for the concept was to be found. Consequently, the aim of this study was to develop an operational definition for the concept "infant wellbeing" that can be used congruently between different members of the multi-disciplinary team. This is done by means of a concept analysis as described by Walker and Avant (2014). The findings revealed that the infant consists of certain dimensions which all play a role in the infant's wellbeing. Equally the infant also functions within a certain system or domain which also affects the wellbeing of the infant. These aspects are discussed in detail. By having a specific general description of infant wellbeing, nurses and other members of the multi-disciplinary team will have a common understanding of what the concept entails which also assists in the development of standardized language within the healthcare profession. / MCur, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2015
2

Infant wellbeing : a concept analysis / Eileen Martha Matthews

Matthews, Eileen Martha January 2014 (has links)
Infant care is an essential part of the healthcare industry and an aspect of healthcare where the multi-disciplinary teams work closely together. Within this collaboration of teams, the term "infant wellbeing" is frequently used. Yet even though wellbeing on its own is a multi-faceted concept, when pertaining to the infant, this concept can become very complex and difficult to understand and apply. Dictionary definitions of wellbeing emphasize a state of being healthy, happy or prosperous. However, despite its common-sense appeal, it was found that the term wellbeing is not a particularly well- defined outcome, especially in reference to the infant. Despite the fact that scrutiny of the literature indicated that the term "infant wellbeing" is used by different members of the multi-disciplinary team, a clear concise universal definition for healthcare settings and professionals is missing from published literature. In fact, no recorded definition for the concept was to be found. Consequently, the aim of this study was to develop an operational definition for the concept "infant wellbeing" that can be used congruently between different members of the multi-disciplinary team. This is done by means of a concept analysis as described by Walker and Avant (2014). The findings revealed that the infant consists of certain dimensions which all play a role in the infant's wellbeing. Equally the infant also functions within a certain system or domain which also affects the wellbeing of the infant. These aspects are discussed in detail. By having a specific general description of infant wellbeing, nurses and other members of the multi-disciplinary team will have a common understanding of what the concept entails which also assists in the development of standardized language within the healthcare profession. / MCur, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2015
3

Perceptions of multi-disciplinary team members regarding psycho-social factors contributing to juvenile delinquency in Oshakati, Namibia

Shatona, Albertina Pombili January 2015 (has links)
Magister Artium (Social Work) - MA(SW) / Child crime (juvenile delinquency) has become a norm in many societies and the world at large. Crime is prevalent in all age groups and is said to be on the increase among children under the age of eighteen. Juvenile delinquency also increases in Namibia. The study was informed by Bronfenbrenner's (1979) ecological systems theory as the factors contributing to the phenomenon are the social relationships and individual's environment. The research question asked by the researcher was: What are the psycho-social factors contributing to juvenile delinquency in Oshakati, Namibia? The research goal, based on the research question, was to achieve an in –depth understanding of the psycho-social factors contributing to juvenile delinquency in Oshakati, Namibia, from the perspectives of the multi-disciplinary team working with the involved youth in this area. The research objectives to attain the goal were: to explore the social factors and psychological factors contributing to juvenile delinquents and, to provide recommendations that could be included in treatment and prevention of the phenomenon. The study adopted an explanatory, descriptive, qualitative approach using the case study strategy of inquiry, where multiple data collection methods and sources were used. The population was the multi-disciplinary team working with the juvenile delinquents in Oshakati, Namibia and eight participants were purposefully selected, including teachers, police officers, social workers and youth workers. Data was gathered through in-depth interviews and document analysis was done in order to involve multiple sources of data. Six themes were identified, which the influence of the internal family environment with reference to lack of parental guidance; lack of parental control and supervision due to parents being absent; the external family environment and delinquency in relation to the social environment with special reference to the effects of bars and social clubs in informal settlements; lack of community support; the school factors; lack of recreational and educational facilities and poverty; adolescence and peer pressure/ peer acceptance and the influence of the media.
4

Domácí hospicová péče z pohledu rodinných příslušníků nevyléčitelně nemocných / Home hospice care from the perspective of family members of the incurably ill.

SVOBODOVÁ, Anna January 2016 (has links)
The goal of my thesis I have chosen is to identify the way hospice care is perceived in the Telč region by family members of terminally ill patients. I based my thesis on available specialised literature, current legislation and internet sources dealing with home hospice care. In the first theoretical part, I deal with the definition of hospice care trying to explain the term of general and specialised care that have a common objective, namely dignified and tranquil dying. The second section deals with family in the context of palliative care that plays the key role in the patient care. If the family decides to care for the incurable patient at home, it is vital to support it. Moreover, in this section I define needs of family members summarised in three core topics. Including the care for the patient family that I included to the hospice care as not only the patient suffers from the illness but all his/her family does. That means that each family member needs palliative care. The end of this section deals with mourning of the survivors. The core point is not leaving them alone in their mourning, to have them accompanied by someone in their grief. The third chapter focuses on the role and position of the patient. It changes when a seriously ill human becomes dependent on third party´s help losing his/her capacity to fulfil his/her professional and family role. This enormously affects his/her physical and emotional condition. Moreover, I describe needs on terminally ill people that change when the patient approaches his/her death depending on his/her family and social situation. It changes also during his/her adaptation to adverse diagnoses and forecast and emergence of difficulties and complications. I describe four groups of needs: biological, psychological, social and spiritual. The fourth chapter characterises home hospice care that is described as specialised palliative care provided in the home environment amidst patient´s family and friends. I describe the history of Czech hospice care stating that before the WWII it was quite normal to care for terminally ill patients at home till the end. This trend emerges again in the 90s. I define objectives of the home hospice care and related activities. The fourth chapter includes the description of a multi-disciplinary team and funding of home hospice care. In the fifth chapter, I characterise the home care organisation that try to expand the range of services by including the home palliative care and also deal with the home care history, objectives, delimitation of the scope of activities, agency human resources management and home funding methods. In the sixth chapter, I represent the organisation Sdílení, o.p.s. Telč, services provided by it and basic duties according to the Act No.108/2006 Coll. as well as the mission and objectives of this organisation concentrating on help and support of seriously ill people and their family members/friends in such difficult life situation. The key objective of Sdílení is to preserve maximum possible self-sufficiency and dignity of seriously ill people and support of families that are able to find the courage and force to accompany a terminally ill family member to the end of his/her life. In the practical part of my thesis, I analyse data collected by means of qualitative research based on an inquiry in the form of semi-standardised and open-code processing. Who was included to the basic file were family members of terminally ill patients who were divided to two parts. The first group consists of 3 respondents who were entrusted to the care of the home hospice Sdílení. The second group are 3 respondents entrusted to the Home Care hospice. In the practical part, I describe the process of collection of data, record results of the interview process by the open-code method.
5

Cross-functional interaction during the early phases of user-centered software new product development: reconsidering the common area of interest

Molin-Juustila, T. (Tonja) 25 April 2006 (has links)
Abstract Applying the principles of user-centered development (UCD) in software development practice is not straightforward. In technology-push type software product development it is not clear how to match the new product innovation to the future needs of potential future users. Intensive collaboration between different organizational functions becomes essential. UCD provides valuable tools and practices as learning mechanisms both for users and for the company. The purpose of cross-functional interaction is to iteratively define the best possible market for the emerging new product. This study investigates cross-functional interaction during the early phases of a new software product. The roots of UCD are in traditional software engineering (SE). However, in a software product company it is necessary to take a broader new product development (NPD) perspective. The results indicate that the early phases of software NPD are actually a collaborative learning process in which representations of the new product are built iteratively, increasing multidisciplinary knowledge related to the evolving shared object of development. The cross-functionally shared object is more than the new software product. It is an emerging new vision for the whole new business area. Both the product and its users-customers-market develop iteratively. Traditionally this is considered to happen through communication within a cross-functional NPD team. Rather than one cross-functional team effort, software NPD seems to be a network of cross-functional activities. Furthermore, in software NPD practice the development of the new business unit may actually overlay the more established business organization. This has not been visible enough, and part of the problems with cross-functional interaction may be due to confusion between these two activity systems during every-day practices. Different mediating representations of the multidimensional object knowledge become crucial. The study starts with a summary of a three-year process improvement effort in one case company, providing the basis for theoretical reflections and analytical generalizations. SE and NPD literature is reviewed to situate the case within current theoretical understanding. The findings are synthesized using concepts from cultural-historical activity theory. This study will hopefully provoke the rethinking of some of the current taken-for-granted issues related to the management of new emerging software product businesses.
6

The development of management guidelines for school social work in the Western Cape

Kemp, Rochshana January 2014 (has links)
Philosophiae Doctor - PhD / The significant increase of social problems experienced by youth such as, teenage pregnancy, child abuse, child sexual offenses, substance abuse and violence impacted adversely on optimal development including learning, retention and throughput within the school context. These social and psychological barriers to learning are commonly addressed by social workers in the course of their work with individuals, families and communities. Therefore it was a natural progression to consider the appointment of social workers in the Western Cape Education System to address the challenges presented by these problems. The practice of school social work has subsequently become essential within the Department of Education. Service delivery in the Western Cape Education Department is centralized and school social workers fall under the auspices of circuit teams with school psychologists, learning support advisors, curriculum advisors and other education officials. This multidisciplinary team is managed by circuit team managers who do not necessarily have training in the disciplines of the respective professionals in their team. This system is called the matrix management system and implies a dual management approach in which health professionals e.g. school social workers, also report to the Head of Specialized Learner and Educator Support (HSLES). The dual or matrix management of school social workers includes a circuit team manager and an “acting senior school social worker.” This study focused on assessing the realities of school social workers being managed under this system and sought to develop guidelines for the management of school social workers. To this end, the present study was conceptualized as Intervention Research within a modified Design and Development model. This form of applied research is used to design and develop interventions to improve social problems using participatory methods. The modification entailed four phases where each phase consisted of operational steps. The first phase focused on project planning that included problem analysis and information gathering as operational steps. This phase aimed to formulate the core problem or focus of the research through rigorous contextualization within the current body of literature on School Social Work and empirical validation using key informants including school social workers. Subsequently document analysis of literature and policies; as well as thematic analysis of interviews and focus groups were conducted. The results informed the core problem or focus for the research. The resultant finding was that dual management impacted negatively on staff morale, professional development, coordination of services, effective service delivery and more broadly posed ethical dilemmas where practices were not aligned to statutory requirements and policy prescriptions of the South Africa Council of Social Workers. The second phase, Design and development, focused on developing a set of management guidelines that would address the problems reported in the experiences of school social workers, specifically related to the dual or matrix management. During this phase data collection included a survey of SSWs, and interviews to inform the management guidelines along with the findings from Phase one. The third phase, Development and Evaluation, focused on testing the proposed guidelines for feasibility and relevance to the problems encountered in a focus group with SSWs. The core findings suggested that SSWs welcomed the statutory base for their work or scope and the explicit recommendations for line management. The participants also responded favorably to the intention, content and recommendations included in the draft guidelines. Clear recommendations were made that were incorporated into a revision of the management guidelines. The evaluation was participatory and resulted in valuable feedback that refined and modified the management guidelines for school social workers. The fourth phase, Dissemination, focused on presenting the iterative process of the research and how the core findings in each phase culminated in the management guidelines. For the purposes of the thesis, dissemination entails the formalized presentation of the development and evaluation process of the guidelines in the form of a doctoral dissertation. Appropriate summative comments are made with clear recommendations for the possible adoption of the guidelines in practice that would enable advanced evaluation in field testing.
7

The internship year : the experience of clinical psychology interns

Kuhn, Carin 12 January 2004 (has links)
The internship year is of paramount importance in the vocational training of clinical psychologists. This event assists the student in making the transition from trainee to professional. During the internship year intern psychologists undergo various transitions, for example a change in roles and a change in learning style. The motivation for this study arose from the researcher's own experience of the internship year in a psychiatric training hospital. The study aims at investigating other intern clinical psychologists' experience of their internship year. The intention of this study is to present descriptions of these experiences. The research design of this study is qualitative, using a phenomenological approach. A phenomenological approach has been followed to return to the phenomenon internship in an attempt to reach the lived world of the respondents. Emphasis is placed on the respondents' perceptions of their experience of the internship year. An informal, unstructured interview was conducted with each research participant. Audio tape recordings of the interviews were transcribed. On analysis of the protocols, several themes were extracted. Each respondent did not necessarily experience each of the identified themes. The themes are discussed in chapter four and linked to the existing literature. The following themes have been identified: the value of the learning experience, a sense of apprehension, the experience of stress, the importance of support, the importance of supervision and mentorship, a sense of not belonging, a sense of isolation from social contexts, the challenges concerning culture, and a sense of achievement. The researcher hopes to make a contribution towards the understanding of intern clinical psychologists’ experience of the internship year. It is also hoped that through this study, further research in this field will be encouraged. / Dissertation (MA (Clinical Psychology))--University of Pretoria, 2005. / Psychology / unrestricted
8

The development of management guidelines for school social work in the Western Cape

Kemp, Rochshana January 2014 (has links)
<p><font size="3"> <p>The significant increase of social problems experienced by youth such as, teenage pregnancy, child abuse, child sexual offenses, substance abuse and violence impacted adversely on optimal development including learning, retention and throughput within the school context. These social and psychological barriers to learning are commonly addressed by social workers in the course of their work with individuals, families and communities. Therefore it was a natural progression to consider the appointment of social workers in the Western Cape Education System to address the challenges presented by these problems. The practice of school social work has subsequently become essential within the Department of Education. Service delivery in the Western Cape Education Department is centralized and school social workers fall under the auspices of circuit teams with school psychologists, learning support advisors, curriculum advisors and other education officials. This multidisciplinary team is managed by circuit team managers who do not necessarily have training in the disciplines of the respective professionals in their team. This system is called the matrix management system and implies a dual management approach in which health professionals e.g. school social workers, also report to the Head of Specialized Learner and Educator Support (HSLES). The dual or matrix management of school social workers includes a circuit team manager and an &quot / acting senior school social worker.&quot / This study focused on assessing the realities of school social workers being managed under this system and sought to develop guidelines for the management of school social workers. To this end, the present study was conceptualized as Intervention Research within a modified Design and Development model. This form of applied research is used to design and develop interventions to improve social problems using participatory methods. The modification entailed four phases where each phase consisted of operational steps. The first phase focused on project planning that included problem analysis and information gathering as operational steps. This phase aimed to formulate the core problem or focus of the research through rigorous contextualization within the current body of literature on School Social Work and empirical validation using key informants including school social workers. Subsequently document analysis of literature and policies / as well as thematic analysis of interviews and focus groups were conducted. The results informed the core problem or focus for the research. The resultant finding was that dual management impacted negatively on staff morale, professional development, coordination of services, effective service delivery and more broadly posed ethical dilemmas where practices were not aligned to statutory requirements and policy prescriptions of the South Africa Council of Social Workers. The second phase, Design and development, focused on developing a set of management guidelines that would address the problems reported in the experiences of school social workers, specifically related to the dual or matrix management. During this phase data collection included a survey of SSWs, and interviews to inform the management guidelines along with the findings from Phase one. The third phase, Development and Evaluation, focused on testing the proposed guidelines for feasibility and relevance to the problems encountered in a focus group with SSWs. The core findings suggested that SSWs welcomed the statutory base for their work or scope and the explicit recommendations for line management. The participants also responded favorably to the intention, content and recommendations included in the draft guidelines. Clear recommendations were made that were incorporated into a revision of the management guidelines. The evaluation was participatory and resulted in valuable feedback that refined and modified the management guidelines for school social workers. The fourth phase, Dissemination, focused on presenting the iterative process of the research and how the core findings in each phase culminated in the management guidelines. For the purposes of the thesis, dissemination entails the formalized presentation of the development and evaluation process of the guidelines in the form of a doctoral dissertation. Appropriate summative comments are made with clear recommendations for the possible adoption of the guidelines in practice that would enable advanced evaluation in field testing.</p> </font></p>
9

"More than a liver" - the role of the social work practitioner in hepatitis C treatment centres

Mouton, Marlize, National Centre in HIV Social Research, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW January 2008 (has links)
Hepatitis C is a fast growing infectious disease in Australia and is often associated with related psycho-social and mental health problems. The conventional treatment process for hepatitis C is challenging due to a number of reasons. This study explored social workers’ perceptions of the contribution of their role in hepatitis C treatment centres in relation to the treatment experience of patients. The roles that social workers fulfill, their contribution to the multidisciplinary team and towards a culturally competent service, were explored. Furthermore the knowledge, skills and values required for providing a competent service in a hepatitis C treatment setting was explored. The broad theoretical frameworks that inform social work practice were considered, especially the biopsycho-social model, the strengths perspective, the critically reflexive approach and communications theory. This qualitative study used a semi-structured interview method for data collection. Ten social workers in hepatitis C treatment clinics participated in the study. The findings highlight the needs of patients and how social worker participants described helping to address and meet these needs by employing their knowledge, skills and values through their social work roles and interventions in a team context in a multicultural and multi-faceted work environment. A major challenge that social workers described was to keep patients on treatment despite debilitating side effects that diminish patients' motivation to complete treatment. A shortcoming in the service was described to be the limited psychiatric support available at many treatment centres. The findings lead to a number of recommendations to improve social work services in hepatitis C treatment settings. More research was recommended in areas such as motivational techniques, psychiatric support, and effective group work strategies. The need for increased funding for social work positions in the hepatitis C field was also highlighted. It is anticipated that findings of this study can be applied to hepatitis C treatment in broader settings such as prisons, drug and alcohol settings and general practice. This research will contribute to literature in the field of hepatitis C treatment models and in the field of social work practice in hepatitis C contexts.
10

"More than a liver" - the role of the social work practitioner in hepatitis C treatment centres

Mouton, Marlize, National Centre in HIV Social Research, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW January 2008 (has links)
Hepatitis C is a fast growing infectious disease in Australia and is often associated with related psycho-social and mental health problems. The conventional treatment process for hepatitis C is challenging due to a number of reasons. This study explored social workers’ perceptions of the contribution of their role in hepatitis C treatment centres in relation to the treatment experience of patients. The roles that social workers fulfill, their contribution to the multidisciplinary team and towards a culturally competent service, were explored. Furthermore the knowledge, skills and values required for providing a competent service in a hepatitis C treatment setting was explored. The broad theoretical frameworks that inform social work practice were considered, especially the biopsycho-social model, the strengths perspective, the critically reflexive approach and communications theory. This qualitative study used a semi-structured interview method for data collection. Ten social workers in hepatitis C treatment clinics participated in the study. The findings highlight the needs of patients and how social worker participants described helping to address and meet these needs by employing their knowledge, skills and values through their social work roles and interventions in a team context in a multicultural and multi-faceted work environment. A major challenge that social workers described was to keep patients on treatment despite debilitating side effects that diminish patients' motivation to complete treatment. A shortcoming in the service was described to be the limited psychiatric support available at many treatment centres. The findings lead to a number of recommendations to improve social work services in hepatitis C treatment settings. More research was recommended in areas such as motivational techniques, psychiatric support, and effective group work strategies. The need for increased funding for social work positions in the hepatitis C field was also highlighted. It is anticipated that findings of this study can be applied to hepatitis C treatment in broader settings such as prisons, drug and alcohol settings and general practice. This research will contribute to literature in the field of hepatitis C treatment models and in the field of social work practice in hepatitis C contexts.

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