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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

L'évolution du concept de l'honnêté de 1660 à 1789

Saisselin, Rémy G. January 1957 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1957. / Typescript. Abstracted in Dissertation abstracts, v. 17 (1957) no. 10, p. 2260-2261. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 244-262).
2

A study of Li Zhi's thought : with special reference to his "tongxin shou" = Li Zhi si xiang yan jiu : yi "tong xin shuo" wei zhong xin /

Pau, Chung-chee, Bruno. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M. A.)--University of Hong Kong, 2007. / Title proper from title frame. Also available in printed format.
3

Feeling entitled to more: ostracism increasesdishonest behavior

Poon, Kai-tak., 潘啟德. January 2013 (has links)
No man is an island. Across cultures and evolutions, human beings desire to be socially accepted by groups and individuals. Having sustainable and positive social connections with others not only promote physical and psychological well-being, but they also provide easy access to important resources, such as food, protection, and information (Baumeister & Leary, 1995). Because ostracism is an aversive interpersonal experience that unjustifiably deprives people's access to important benefits and resources (e.g. Williams, 2007, 2009), ostracized people may feel that they are psychologically entitled to more internal and external rewards than others. These increased feelings of psychological entitlement may then increase their propensity to behave dishonestly. Six experiments were conducted to examine the hypotheses that ostracism increased dishonesty through increased feelings of psychological entitlement. The results revealed that compared to included and control participants, ostracized participants indicated higher levels of dishonest intentions (Experiments 1, 2, and 5) and behaved more dishonestly in a performance task to obtain undeserved money (Experiments 3, 4 and 6). Furthermore, increased feelings of psychological entitlement mediated the effect of ostracism on dishonesty (Experiments 4 to 6). Framing ostracism as an experience that may be beneficial to the self weakened the effects of ostracism on psychological entitlement and dishonest behavior (Experiment 6). Taken together, these findings provide the first experimental evidence that ostracism increases dishonesty. They also highlight the importance of psychological entitlement in explaining and understanding when and why ostracism increases dishonesty. The understanding of the mechanism underlying the effect of ostracism on dishonesty is useful in deciding methods to weaken the connection between ostracism, psychological entitlement and dishonest behavior. Further implications are discussed. / published_or_final_version / Psychology / Doctoral / Doctor of Philosophy
4

Cognitive distortions in child sexual offenders : fact or fiction?

Gannon, Theresa Ann January 2002 (has links)
No description available.
5

Molière ou l'honnêteté

Rojat, Paul-Henry. January 1997 (has links)
Thesis (Doctoral)--Université Jean Moulin-Lyon III, lettres, 1997. / Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
6

Molière ou l'honnêteté

Rojat, Paul-Henry. January 1997 (has links)
Thesis (Doctoral)--Université Jean Moulin-Lyon III, lettres, 1997. / Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
7

The tradition of honesty in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama

Houser, David John, January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1970. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliography.
8

Prediction of socially undesirable behaviors :: cheating, shoplifting, and lying.

Beck, Lisa Marie 01 January 1989 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
9

If They Only Knew

Dolbow, James, Deaton, Matt 01 January 2022 (has links)
No description available.
10

Do as I say, not as I do? Supervisory behavioral integrity, shared financial interests, and subordinate honesty in budget reporting

Zhang, Zhen 14 August 2015 (has links)
Participative budgeting plays an important role for information communication among hierarchies in organizations. In this study, I use a lab experiment to examine three research questions and investigate the role of supervisors in influencing subordinate honesty. First, I predict and find support that supervisory behavioral integrity, i.e. the alignment between a superior’s communication of a value of honesty and the superior’s behavioral honesty, is an effective informal control mechanism to influence employee honesty. However, the effectiveness of supervisory behavioral integrity in influencing employee honesty depends on the presence of shared financial interests between the superior and the subordinates, such that high supervisory behavioral integrity may promote employee honesty only in the presence of shared financial interests. In the absence of shared financial interests, supervisory behavioral integrity is no longer effective in influencing employee honesty. Finally, I investigate whether supervisory behavioral integrity, compared to supervisory behavioral honesty, has incremental effect on subordinate honesty. The results suggest that, compared to supervisory behavioral honesty, supervisory behavioral integrity has a stronger influence on subordinate honesty. Furthermore, high supervisory behavioral honesty is shown to have a demotion effect on subordinate honesty, i.e. subordinate honesty is lower when superior’s honesty is high than when it is low. Supplemental analysis provides potential explanations for the demotion effect. The implications of the findings for management accounting research and practice are discussed.

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