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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Do you really want to hurt me? ostracism-induced physical pain sensitization in real-life relationships /

Dickinson, Annelise K. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (B.A.)--Haverford College, Dept. of Psychology, 2009. / Includes bibliographical references.
2

(When) does exclusion hurt? pain sensitivity following ostracism in close relationships /

Freedman, Gili. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (B.A.)--Haverford College, Dept. of Psychology, 2009. / Includes bibliographical references.
3

Social isolation in the playground

Bonn, M. January 1987 (has links)
No description available.
4

The Oxytocinergic Anti-Inflammatory Pathway in Atherosclerosis

Nation, Daniel Addison 25 June 2009 (has links)
Background. Social deprivation or isolation accelerates the progression of atherosclerosis in several animal models of the disease. Conversely, stable social environment has been associated with reduction in the extent and severity of atherosclerosis. While positive social interactions are thought to be related to this protective effect, little is known about the physiological mechanisms responsible. Recently, the neurohypophyseal peptide, oxytocin (OT), has been found to play a role in both positive social interactions and cardiovascular homeostasis, suggesting that this neuropeptide may be responsible for mediating the beneficial effects of positive social environment on atherosclerosis. The first aim of the current study is to examine the potential anti-inflammatory effects of OT on in vitro cellular models involved in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. The second aim is to examine whether long-term administration of OT slows the progression of atherosclerosis in apoE-/- mice. The third aim is to obtain evidence in vivo that OT is impacting disease through novel anti-inflammatory effects on tissues important in atherogenesis. Methods. 1) Human macrophage-like (DTHP-1) cells and human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharde (LPS) alone, and in the presence of different concentrations of OT, and IL-6 secretion was measured. 2) ApoE-/- mice were socially isolated at 12 weeks of age and continuously infused with OT (n=24) or vehicle (n=21) from subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps for 12 weeks. Plasma levels of lipids, adiponectin, insulin, and CRP were assessed pre- and post-treatment. Extent of aortic atherosclerosis (percent lesion area) was assessed post-treatment and areas of high lesion prevalence were compared between OT and vehicle (VH) control groups. Constitutive release of IL-6 from ex vivo adipose tissue samples taken from a subset (n=12/group) was compared between treatment groups. Results. 1) OT demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of LPS-induced IL-6 secretion from macrophages (35-55%, p < 0.01) and aortic endothelial cells (15-25%, p < 0.01). 2) ApoE-/- mice continuously infused with OT displayed decreased plasma CRP levels after 6 weeks of treatment and diminished lesion area at the thoracic aorta after 12 weeks of treatment relative to vehicle control animals (37%, p < 0.05). Additionally, adipose tissue samples taken from OT infused mice showed decreased constitutive release of IL-6 (30%, p < 0.01). These findings were unrelated to changes in plasma lipids, insulin, physical activity levels, or 24-hour corticosterone secretion. Discussion and Conclusions. These findings demonstrate that OT is capable of inhibiting stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and aortic endothelial cells in vitro, and constitutive release from adipose tissue in vivo. OT also decreased circulating CRP levels and slowed the progression of early stage atherosclerosis in an aortic region of high lesion prevalence in socially isolated apoE-/- mice. Taken together, these results suggest that increased peripheral OT could be partially responsible for the beneficial effect of positive social environment on atherosclerosis.
5

The lived experiences of socially-isolated senior women

Tatarkiewicz, Iwona 24 June 2013 (has links)
Social isolation has been linked with negative health effects in senior women. The purpose of this study was to understand the lived experiences of socially-isolated senior women. Local senior-serving organizations assisted with the recruitment of six socially-isolated senior women to participate in individual qualitative interviews. Three service providers were also interviewed. Seniors’ interviews were analyzed using interpretive phenomenological analysis and service provider interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. Three superordinate themes were derived from the senior interviews: social needs, self-perceptions of isolation and loneliness, and constraints to and facilitators of social engagement. Five superordinate themes were derived from the service provider interviews: definitions of social isolation, differences between social isolation and loneliness, gender differences in isolation and loneliness, identifying socially-isolated seniors, and essential components of initiatives aimed at reducing social isolation. The views of socially-isolated seniors are important to understand to develop programs and policies that promote healthy aging.
6

Feeling entitled to more: ostracism increasesdishonest behavior

Poon, Kai-tak., 潘啟德. January 2013 (has links)
No man is an island. Across cultures and evolutions, human beings desire to be socially accepted by groups and individuals. Having sustainable and positive social connections with others not only promote physical and psychological well-being, but they also provide easy access to important resources, such as food, protection, and information (Baumeister & Leary, 1995). Because ostracism is an aversive interpersonal experience that unjustifiably deprives people's access to important benefits and resources (e.g. Williams, 2007, 2009), ostracized people may feel that they are psychologically entitled to more internal and external rewards than others. These increased feelings of psychological entitlement may then increase their propensity to behave dishonestly. Six experiments were conducted to examine the hypotheses that ostracism increased dishonesty through increased feelings of psychological entitlement. The results revealed that compared to included and control participants, ostracized participants indicated higher levels of dishonest intentions (Experiments 1, 2, and 5) and behaved more dishonestly in a performance task to obtain undeserved money (Experiments 3, 4 and 6). Furthermore, increased feelings of psychological entitlement mediated the effect of ostracism on dishonesty (Experiments 4 to 6). Framing ostracism as an experience that may be beneficial to the self weakened the effects of ostracism on psychological entitlement and dishonest behavior (Experiment 6). Taken together, these findings provide the first experimental evidence that ostracism increases dishonesty. They also highlight the importance of psychological entitlement in explaining and understanding when and why ostracism increases dishonesty. The understanding of the mechanism underlying the effect of ostracism on dishonesty is useful in deciding methods to weaken the connection between ostracism, psychological entitlement and dishonest behavior. Further implications are discussed. / published_or_final_version / Psychology / Doctoral / Doctor of Philosophy
7

Relationship of social isolation to psychotherapeutic drug use in the adult

Bustamante, Linda Louise Brommer, 1942- January 1978 (has links)
No description available.
8

Persons with rheumatoid arthritis and social isolation

Johnson, Shirley Ann, 1935- January 1976 (has links)
No description available.
9

Social deprivation and open-field behavior in young rats

Schatz, Gary Curtis, 1943- January 1971 (has links)
No description available.
10

The lived experiences of socially-isolated senior women

Tatarkiewicz, Iwona 24 June 2013 (has links)
Social isolation has been linked with negative health effects in senior women. The purpose of this study was to understand the lived experiences of socially-isolated senior women. Local senior-serving organizations assisted with the recruitment of six socially-isolated senior women to participate in individual qualitative interviews. Three service providers were also interviewed. Seniors’ interviews were analyzed using interpretive phenomenological analysis and service provider interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. Three superordinate themes were derived from the senior interviews: social needs, self-perceptions of isolation and loneliness, and constraints to and facilitators of social engagement. Five superordinate themes were derived from the service provider interviews: definitions of social isolation, differences between social isolation and loneliness, gender differences in isolation and loneliness, identifying socially-isolated seniors, and essential components of initiatives aimed at reducing social isolation. The views of socially-isolated seniors are important to understand to develop programs and policies that promote healthy aging.

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