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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
31

System development for pharmacy at University of Michigan Medical Center submitted ... in partial fulfillment ... Master of Hospital Administration /

Faja, Garry C. Gullickson, Marcus R. January 1975 (has links)
Thesis (M.H.A.)--University of Michigan, 1975.
32

A charging system for pharmaceutical goods and services emphasizing the professional fee approach : submitted to the Program in Hospital Administration ... in partial fulfillment ... for the degree of Master of Hospital Administration /

Arnow, Steven J. January 1974 (has links)
Thesis (M.H.A.)--University of Michigan, 1974.
33

Pharmacy services at Ypsilanti State Hospital submitted ... in partial fulfillment ... Master of Hospital Administration /

Goodnow, John H. January 1976 (has links)
Thesis (M.H.A.)--University of Michigan, 1976.
34

An evaluation of the reform and quality of pharmacy service in Hospital Authority : a case study at Princess Margaret Hospital /

Yao, Wei-yen, Rosa. January 1995 (has links)
Thesis (M.P.A.)--University of Hong Kong, 1995. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 122-129).
35

An evaluation of the reform and quality of pharmacy service in Hospital Authority a case study at Princess Margaret Hospital /

Yao, Wei-yen, Rosa. January 1995 (has links)
Thesis (M.P.A.)--University of Hong Kong, 1995. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 122-129). Also available in print.
36

The impact of a ward pharmacist in a surgical ward of a private hospital in the Eastern Cape

Stone, Leanne Nicole, Burton, S F January 2015 (has links)
Medication errors are becoming problematic in both hospital and outpatient settings worldwide. Inappropriate use of medication can cause harm to the patient and maintaining high levels of quality patient care is essential to protect all patients. Clinical pharmacy practice contributes to improved patient care by optimising medication therapy; and promoting health, wellness and disease prevention. The involvement of a pharmacist at a ward level has been shown to improve patient care; reduce mortality and morbidity rates; decrease healthcare costs; minimise medication errors; and improve outcomes of drug therapy. However, clinical pharmacy is a fairly new practice in South Africa and there are limited studies available. This study aimed to evaluate the perceived benefits of a ward-based pharmacist on the provision of pharmaceutical care to patients in a hospital setting and to consequently implement a ward-based pharmacy service. The objectives of the study were: (1) to assess, via a questionnaire, the perceptions and attitudes of medical practitioners and nurses to ward-based pharmacy prior to and after implementation of a ward-based pharmacy service, (2) to implement a ward-based pharmacy service in a selected hospital ward; (3) to document and analyse the nature of the work and activities that a ward pharmacist undertakes, and (4) to document and analyse the frequency and nature of ward pharmacist interventions. The study was conducted in a surgical ward of a private hospital in the Eastern Cape. The study design was an intervention study, using a mixed-methods design, with a convergent approach. A convenience sample of 106 patients was obtained over the eight week study period. Participation was voluntary and confidentiality was maintained at all times. Four data collection tools were used during the study and a pilot study was conducted to ensure their validity and reliability. The quantitative data was analysed statistically while the qualitative questions were analysed through coding the various responses. The results of the study showed that medical practitioners and nurses of a surgical ward had a positive attitude towards ward pharmacy both prior to and after the implementation of a ward pharmacy service. There were ward pharmacist interventions made in 50% (n=106) of the patients who participated in the study. A large percentage (57%; 50; n=87) of the ward pharmacist interventions were pharmacist-initiated interventions to optimise patient care while prescribing errors (51%; 19; n=37) were the most commonly occurring medication error. The majority of the medication items involved in the interventions (34%; 34; n=101) were related to the anti-microbial medication class. Overall, there was a 73% (36; n=49) acceptance rate of the ward pharmacist interventions that were made to both the medical practitioners and nurses. There were a number of factors that had a significant relationship with a ward pharmacist intervention being required which included: (1) number of medication items (p=0.001; Chi² test; p<0.0005 Student’s t-test), (2) length of hospital stay (p<0.0005; Chi² test), (3) presence of one or more chronic disease states (p=0.003; Chi² test) and (4) presence of one or more allergies (p=0.028; Chi² test). The ward pharmacist interventions were shown to be of clinical significance and to have a positive impact on the patients concerned. It can be concluded that the ward pharmacy service was beneficial to the patients, medical practitioners and nursing staff.
37

The impact of clinical pharmacy services on the low-density lipoprotein goal attainment with lipid lowering therapies.

January 2008 (has links)
Chung, Jennifer Siu Toye. / "June 2008." / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2008. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 145-157). / Abstracts in English and Chinese, some text in appendix also in Chinese. / Abstract of Thesis in English --- p.i / Abstract of Thesis in Chinese --- p.iii / Acknowledgments --- p.v / List of Tables --- p.xi / List of Figures --- p.xiii / List of Abbreviations --- p.xiv / List of Publications and Presentations related to Thesis --- p.xvi / Contributions related to Thesis --- p.xvii / Chapter Chapter 1 --- Introduction --- p.1 / Chapter 1.1 --- Introduction of the Thesis --- p.1 / Chapter 1.2 --- Review on Coronary Heart Disease --- p.3 / Chapter 1.2.1 --- Definition of Coronary Heart Disease --- p.3 / Chapter 1.2.2 --- Risk factors for the development of Coronary Heart Disease --- p.3 / Chapter 1.2.3 --- Worldwide Figures for Coronary Heart Disease --- p.9 / Chapter 1.2.4 --- Coronary Heart Disease in Asia Pacific --- p.10 / Chapter 1.2.5 --- Coronary Heart Disease in Hong Kong --- p.11 / Chapter 1.3 --- Dyslipidaemia --- p.14 / Chapter 1.3.1 --- Lipid Transport and Lipoprotein Metabolism --- p.14 / Chapter 1.3.2 --- Definition and Classification of Dyslipidaemia --- p.16 / Chapter 1.3.3 --- Coronary Heart Disease and Dyslipidaemia --- p.17 / Chapter 1.3.4 --- Lifestyle Modifications for the Management of Dyslipidaemia --- p.19 / Chapter 1.3.4.1 --- Dietary Measures --- p.20 / Chapter 1.3.4.2 --- Cigarette Smoking --- p.23 / Chapter 1.3.4.3 --- Physical Activity --- p.24 / Chapter 1.3.4.4 --- Weight Control --- p.25 / Chapter 1.3.5 --- Lipid-lowering Drug Therapy for Dyslipidaemia --- p.29 / Chapter 1.3.5.1 --- Statins --- p.31 / Chapter 1.3.5.2 --- Bile Acid Sequestrants --- p.35 / Chapter 1.3.5.3 --- Fibrates --- p.36 / Chapter 1.3.5.4 --- Ezetimibe --- p.37 / Chapter 1.3.5.5 --- Nicotinic Acid Group --- p.38 / Chapter 1.4 --- International Guidelines for Dyslipidaemic Management --- p.39 / Chapter 1.4.1 --- National Service Framework for Coronary Heart Disease (UK) --- p.39 / Chapter 1.4.1.1 --- National Service Framework Lipid-lowering Goals --- p.40 / Chapter 1.4.1.2 --- The Joint British Societies' Guidelines --- p.41 / Chapter 1.4.1.3 --- Achievement of the NSF Lipid Profile Targets --- p.42 / Chapter 1.4.2 --- National Cholesterol Education Program (United States) --- p.43 / Chapter 1.4.2.1 --- The Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program --- p.43 / Chapter 1.4.2.2 --- Review of Clinical Trials --- p.43 / Chapter 1.4.2.3 --- Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Goal Targets --- p.46 / Chapter 1.4.2.4 --- Compliance with the NCEP ATP III Guidelines --- p.48 / Chapter 1.4.3 --- Dyslipidaemic Guidelines for Study --- p.51 / Chapter 1.5 --- Clinical Pharmacy Services --- p.52 / Chapter 1.5.1 --- The Healthcare System in Hong Kong --- p.52 / Chapter 1.5.2 --- Clinical Pharmacy Services in Hong Kong --- p.54 / Chapter 1.5.3 --- Examples of successful Clinical Pharmacy Services --- p.55 / Chapter 1.5.3.1 --- Hypertension Clinic --- p.55 / Chapter 1.5.3.2 --- Diabetes Mellitus Clinic --- p.56 / Chapter 1.5.3.3 --- Smoking Cessation Clinic --- p.57 / Chapter 1.5.3.4 --- Anticoagulation Clinic --- p.57 / Chapter 1.5.3.5 --- Haematology-oncology Clinic --- p.57 / Chapter 1.5.4 --- Pharmacist-managed Lipid Clinics --- p.58 / Chapter 1.6 --- Objective & General Aims of the Study --- p.60 / Chapter 1.6.1 --- Objectives --- p.60 / Chapter 1.6.2 --- Study Hypothesis --- p.60 / Chapter 1.6.3 --- General Aims of the Study --- p.60 / Chapter Chapter 2 --- Methodology of Study --- p.62 / Chapter 2.1 --- Background Setting --- p.62 / Chapter 2.2 --- Subject Selection and Recruitment --- p.62 / Chapter 2.3 --- Intervention and Control Groups --- p.63 / Chapter 2.4 --- Validation of Survey --- p.67 / Chapter 2.5 --- Data Collection --- p.67 / Chapter 2.6 --- Outcome Measures --- p.68 / Chapter 2.6.1 --- Lipid value changes --- p.68 / Chapter 2.6.2 --- Compliance rate with medications --- p.68 / Chapter 2.6.3 --- Patient satisfaction survey assessment --- p.69 / Chapter 2.6.4 --- Time spent and Cost of clinical pharmacist --- p.69 / Chapter 2.7 --- Statistical Analysis --- p.70 / Chapter 2.7.1 --- Sample Size Calculation --- p.70 / Chapter 2.7.2 --- Methods of Statistical Analysis --- p.71 / Chapter Chapter 3 --- Results of Study --- p.72 / Chapter 3.1 --- Recruitment Details --- p.72 / Chapter 3.2 --- Demographic Characteristics of Patients --- p.73 / Chapter 3.3 --- Drug Therapy of Patients during Study Period --- p.75 / Chapter 3.4 --- LDL-C Lowering Potency of Statin Doses Prescribed --- p.80 / Chapter 3.5 --- Coronary Heart Disease Risk Category of Patients --- p.84 / Chapter 3.6 --- Lipid Profile Changes --- p.85 / Chapter 3.7 --- NCEP ATP III LDL-C Goal Attainment --- p.87 / Chapter 3.8 --- Relationship between Patient Characteristics and LDL-C Goal Attainment --- p.91 / Chapter 3.9 --- Compliance with Medications --- p.94 / Chapter 3.10 --- Pharmacist Intervention --- p.98 / Chapter 3.10.1 --- Range of Pharmacist Intervention --- p.98 / Chapter 3.10.2 --- Time spent by Pharmacist --- p.100 / Chapter 3.10.2.1 --- Time spent on Documentation --- p.100 / Chapter 3.10.2.2 --- Time spent on Direct Communication with Patients --- p.101 / Chapter 3.10.3 --- Cost of Clinical Pharmacy Service at the Lipid Clinic --- p.102 / Chapter 3.10.3.1 --- Cost of Pharmacist Involvement --- p.102 / Chapter 3.10.3.2 --- Potential Healthcare Cost Saving --- p.103 / Chapter 3.11 --- Clinical Pharmacy Service Satisfaction Survey --- p.105 / Chapter 3.11.1 --- Validation of Survey --- p.105 / Chapter 3.11.2 --- Questionnaire Survey for Intervention and Control Groups --- p.107 / Chapter 3.11.3 --- Physician Questionnaire Survey on Clinical Pharmacy Service --- p.110 / Chapter Chapter 4 --- Discussion --- p.111 / Chapter 4.1 --- Clinical Outcomes of Study --- p.111 / Chapter 4.1.1 --- Changes in Lipid Parameters --- p.111 / Chapter 4.1.2 --- Reduction in CHD risk --- p.113 / Chapter 4.1.3 --- Attainment in NCEP ATP III LDL-C goals --- p.114 / Chapter 4.1.4 --- Predictors for LDL-C Goal Attainment --- p.117 / Chapter 4.2 --- Drug-related Problems --- p.119 / Chapter 4.2.1 --- Statin Dosing and LDL-C Lowering Potency --- p.119 / Chapter 4.2.2 --- Adherence to Drug Therapy --- p.121 / Chapter 4.2.3 --- Polypharmacy --- p.126 / Chapter 4.2.4 --- Adverse Drug Events and Drug Interactions --- p.129 / Chapter 4.2.5 --- Patient Busy Lifestyle --- p.131 / Chapter 4.3 --- Role of Clinical Pharmacist --- p.133 / Chapter 4.3.1 --- Role of Pharmacist --- p.133 / Chapter 4.3.2 --- Multidisciplinary Team --- p.135 / Chapter 4.3.3 --- Healthcare Cost Saving --- p.137 / Chapter 4.4 --- Limitations of Study --- p.139 / Chapter 4.5 --- Further Study --- p.142 / Chapter Chapter 5 --- Conclusion --- p.144 / Chapter 5.1 --- Conclusion of Study --- p.144 / Bibliography --- p.145 / Appendices --- p.158 / Appendix I Data collection form --- p.158 / Appendix II Information sheet on study protocol to patient --- p.160 / Appendix III Patient consent form for study --- p.164 / Appendix IV Framingham risk scoring system for male --- p.165 / Appendix V Framingham risk scoring system for female --- p.166 / Appendix VI Patient educational leaflet --- p.167 / Appendix VII Physician-pharmacist communication sheet --- p.169 / Appendix VIII Telephone checklist --- p.170 / Appendix IX Questionnaire survey provided to Intervention Group --- p.172 / Appendix X Questionnaire survey provided to Control Group --- p.174 / Appendix XI Questionnaire survey provided to Physicians --- p.176
38

The clinical pharmacy program in a community hospital setting : an integral part of the educational process

Kamian, Franklin D. 01 January 1976 (has links)
The intent of this work is to emphasize that the concept of clinical pharmacy is no longer an innovation or an educational experiment, but rather is a reality which requires national recognition, professional as well as legislative support, and clearly planned educational preparation.
39

Clinical and financial evaluation of patients within a diagnosis related group

Ibrahim, Osama M. 01 January 1984 (has links)
The purpose of this study is to evaluate financial and clinical data of patients within a selected DRG. The data obtained from such analysis will be used to design a system whereby clinical pharmacists may improve the hospital's reimbursement potential. Based upon Upton's proposed plan, this study is designed to evaluate all DRGs in a community hospital in an attempt to focus on those DRGs which represent the greatest financial pressure to the pharmacy department and, therefore, to the institution. Clinical and financial data of patients within the expensive DRG, will be collected from their medical and financial records for subsequent statistical analysis with special consideration to pharmacy charges. The ultimate objective of this study, though, is to provide a list of measures or parameters that may affect the patient's hospital charges. Using these parameters, the clinical pharmacists will be able to intensify their monitoring of patients with high pharmacy charges in an attempt to reduce their impact on patients' charges. This study was designed to review and analyze DRGs at St. Joseph's Hospital, in Stockton, Californias. The main objective was to determine the relationship between clinical and financial data for patients within a DRG. The second objective was to identify patient-specific information that may reflect high pharmacy charges and the need for clinical pharmacy intervention. The third objective was to propose criteria that may predict which patients need to be monitored in an attempt to control pharmacy charges within a selected DRG category.
40

Increased Efficiency: Formulary Drug Conversion Automation Using Visual Basic-Based Macros with Attachmate Reflections in the Pharmacy Setting

Naville, Chad A. 22 November 2013 (has links)
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) / Health care automation provides opportunities for health care agencies to save time, save money, and increase patient safety. The Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers use a program, Attachmate Reflections, for pharmacy medication order verification. This program is a command line interface that allows the use of macros, or programmed automated routines, that have the ability to automate repetitive tasks. Through the use of macro programming at the VISN 11 VA medical centers, this author was able to automate converting patients from Combivent MDI inhalers to its successor Combivent Respimat inhalers due to the MDI inhaler being withdrawn from the market. Usage of the macro resulted in a time savings of 649.1 hours, cost savings of $32,748.36, and increased patient safety by providing consistent medication instructions, correct dispense quantities, correct prescription day supply, and correct number of refills remaining on the prescription.

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