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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

School-based support teams' experiences of the support that they provide within their schools

Gaffney, Theona January 2016 (has links)
A research report submitted to the Discipline of Psychology, Faculty of Humanities, University of the Witwatersrand, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters in Education (Educational Psychology) Johannesburg, South Africa February 2015 / This study set out to investigate school-based support teams’ experiences of the support that they provide within their schools. School-based support teams have a key role in providing support to teachers and learners through consultation on classroom strategies, case management, referrals and decisions regarding resources within the school with the aim of identifying and addressing barriers to learning. This research specifically explores School-based support teams’ experiences of providing support in order to gain an understanding of the role that these teams play in schools. Data for this study was collected by conducting focus group interviews with 25 school-based support team members from 5 government primary schools in the Johannesburg East District. In addition, the head of each participating school-based support team completed a questionnaire. The data collected resulted in the generation of four main themes relating to school-based support teams’ experiences of providing support within their schools. These were: the functionality of school-based support teams specifically with regards to providing support within their schools, as well as the responsibilities and structure of school-based support teams; access to specialist support, and the District Based Support Team as well as parental involvement; collaboration and the benefits of collaboration; and finally the functionality of the District Based Support Team focussing on school infrastructure, and the involvement of District Based Support Teams / MT2016
2

A study of integrated education in Hong Kong prospect for success? /

Choi, Kin-man, Josephine. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (M. Ed.)--University of Hong Kong, 2005. / Title proper from title frame. Also available in printed format.
3

Rhetoric and reality of inclusion : an examination of policy and practice in Southampton Local Education Authority.

Ramjhun, Ahmad Faoud. January 2001 (has links)
Thesis (EdD)--Open University.
4

Concerns of middle and high school teachers toward inclusion of students with exceptional education needs

Alexander, Jack. January 2001 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis--PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2001. / Includes bibliographical references.
5

Senior teacher perceptions towards inclusion

Larson, Shawna A. January 2001 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis--PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2001. / Includes bibliographical references.
6

A study of the attitudes of high school special education students towards inclusion

Laher, Sue. January 2001 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis--PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2001. / Includes bibliographical references.
7

The effects of inclusion on general education students

Pawlowicz, Bruce. January 2001 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis--PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2001. / Includes bibliographical references.
8

Special education and general education teacher attitudes toward inclusion

Olson, Jennifer Marie. January 2003 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis--PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2003. / Includes bibliographical references.
9

Unseen threads: weaving the stories between teacher beliefs and classroom practice

Braun, Sheena 13 September 2011 (has links)
This qualitative research study examines the relationship between three teacher participants’ beliefs and their classroom practices as it relates to the ongoing implementation of inclusive education and Manitoba’s regulated Bill 13 (Manitoba Education Citizenship and Youth Appropriate Educational Programming 2007). Semi-structured interviews provide personal narratives of beliefs about learning, inclusion and disability. Classroom observations provide an opportunity to examine the influence on practice. Additionally, the study determines if self-described beliefs match observed classroom actions. Findings suggest that there are varying degrees of commitment to inclusive practice which are determined by individual frustrations, teacher confidence, teacher skill levels and understandings of role and responsibility. The conclusion proposes that we continue to have a gap between teacher knowledge and professional actions. It further suggests that inclusion’s implementation will be reliant on individual teacher commitment to fostering inclusive practice in addition to systemic structural reform which supports the ideals of inclusion in relevant and pragmatic ways.
10

Unseen threads: weaving the stories between teacher beliefs and classroom practice

Braun, Sheena 13 September 2011 (has links)
This qualitative research study examines the relationship between three teacher participants’ beliefs and their classroom practices as it relates to the ongoing implementation of inclusive education and Manitoba’s regulated Bill 13 (Manitoba Education Citizenship and Youth Appropriate Educational Programming 2007). Semi-structured interviews provide personal narratives of beliefs about learning, inclusion and disability. Classroom observations provide an opportunity to examine the influence on practice. Additionally, the study determines if self-described beliefs match observed classroom actions. Findings suggest that there are varying degrees of commitment to inclusive practice which are determined by individual frustrations, teacher confidence, teacher skill levels and understandings of role and responsibility. The conclusion proposes that we continue to have a gap between teacher knowledge and professional actions. It further suggests that inclusion’s implementation will be reliant on individual teacher commitment to fostering inclusive practice in addition to systemic structural reform which supports the ideals of inclusion in relevant and pragmatic ways.

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