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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

Preparing future educators to support inclusion college students' attitudes following pre-professional preparations /

Shier, Emily. January 2002 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis--PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2002. / Includes bibliographical references.
12

High school special needs students attitudes about inclusion

Pierce, LaRue A. January 2000 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis--PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2000. / Includes bibliographical references.
13

The establishment of an inclusive elementary school

Hepp, Tina L. January 2007 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.Ed.)--Regis University, Denver, Colo., 2007. / Title from PDF title page (viewed on June 8, 2007). Includes bibliographical references.
14

The experiences of teachers in developing inclusive classrooms

Hyam, Mary Elizabeth 24 January 2012 (has links)
M.Ed.
15

Implementation of inclusive education

Zulu, Dominica Ntombiyenkosi January 2007 (has links)
Submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree Master of Education in the Department of Educational Psychology & Special Education of the Faculty of Education at the University of Zululand, 2007. / The aim of this investigation was to establish educators' perceptions of the implementation of inclusive education. From the literature study it emerges that inclusive education constitutes a challenge to the education system in South Africa, in particular to mainstream educators. Successful implementation of inclusive education requires educators to have a positive attitude, be flexible and critical, creative and innovative in their approach to teaching and learning. Educators are expected to have the necessary knowledge, skills, competencies and support to accommodate a wide range of diversity among learners in an inclusive classroom. They must be able to select appropriate teaching strategies to achieve specific outcomes. Effective inclusion will only stay a dream if educators do not have the necessary training, support systems and appropriate resources. For the purpose of the empirical investigation a self-structured questionnaire, to be completed by educators from primary schools, was utilised. The data obtained from the completed questionnaires were analysed and commented on by means of descriptive statistics. In conclusion a summary was presented on the findings of the literature review and empirical investigation and the following are some of the recommendations that were made: > Opportunities for in-service training regarding inclusive education must be made available to mainstream educators. > The Department of Education must provide adequate support to educators concerning all aspects of inclusive education.
16

Principals' knowledge and attitudes regarding inclusive education: implications for curriculum and assessment

Mthethwa, Gerald Simangaliso January 2008 (has links)
Submitted to the Faculty of Education in fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Education in the Department of Curriculum & Instructional Studies at the University of Zululand, 2008. / The present study examiners principals' knowledge about and attitudes towards inclusive education. The first aim of the study was to ascertain the extent to which principals know about inclusive education and a child with special educational needs. The second aim was to determine whether principals' biographical factors (gender, teaching experience and phase of the school) have any influence on their knowledge about inclusive education and a child with a special educational needs. The third aim was to ascertain the nature of principals' attitudes towards inclusive education. The fourth aim was to determine whether principals' biographical factors (gender, teaching experience and phase of the school) have any influence on their attitudes towards inclusive education. The last aim was to determine whether there is any relationship between principals' knowledge and attitudes regarding inclusive education. To this end, a questionnaire was administered to a randomly selected sample of two hundred and twelve principals. The findings reveal that principals differ in the extent to which they know about inclusive education and a child with special educational needs. A high percentage (65.1%) of principals report a high level of knowledge about inclusive education and a child with special educational needs. The findings also show that teaching experience has an influence of principals' knowledge about inclusive education and a child with special educational needs. The findings also indicate that a high percentage (60.8%) of principals hold a positive attitude towards inclusive education. The findings further reveal that gender, teaching experience and phase of the school have no influence on principals' attitudes towards inclusive education. The last findings show that there is a positive relationship between principals' knowledge about an attitudes towards inclusive education. On the basis of the findings of this study, recommendations to the Department of Education as well as for directing future research were made.
17

Teaching in inclusive classrooms :|bpolicy versus implementation /|cNichola Harmuth

Harmuth, Nichola January 2012 (has links)
Inclusive education occupies a central place in the education policies of South Africa (SA, 2001). This study explored whether the principles of inclusive education as set out in White Paper 6, are becoming a reality in primary school classrooms in South Africa. A literature study was undertaken to highlight the importance and the policy initiatives and principles of inclusive education. The literature review provided the framework for designing the interview questions that were utilized to gauge the perceptions and experiences of teachers regarding the implementation of inclusive education by means of focus group interviews. By means of a qualitative, phenomenological study, the focus group interviews were conducted with a convenient and purposively selected sample of primary school teachers (n = 18) in the Johannesburg South District of the Gauteng Department of Education. The interview data revealed that teachers do have an understanding of the importance of inclusive education, and appear to be knowledgeable on what the inclusive education policy entails. Furthermore, the teachers attempt to provide differentiated teaching, learning and assessment to address the wide variety of learning barriers in their classrooms. However, comprehensive knowledge about the wide variety of strategies to accommodate all learning needs appears to be lacking. The teachers noted that their training, resources and facilities are not adequate for the effective implementation of the policy principles in South African classrooms. The findings revealed that although the inclusive education policy is positively accepted by the teachers, its implementation appears to be superficial due to the cited challenges faced by the participants. The study is concluded with recommendations on how to promote the implementation of the challenging inclusive education policy principles in order to minimize the gap between policy and implementation. / MEd, Learner Support, North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, 2013
18

Teaching in inclusive classrooms :|bpolicy versus implementation /|cNichola Harmuth

Harmuth, Nichola January 2012 (has links)
Inclusive education occupies a central place in the education policies of South Africa (SA, 2001). This study explored whether the principles of inclusive education as set out in White Paper 6, are becoming a reality in primary school classrooms in South Africa. A literature study was undertaken to highlight the importance and the policy initiatives and principles of inclusive education. The literature review provided the framework for designing the interview questions that were utilized to gauge the perceptions and experiences of teachers regarding the implementation of inclusive education by means of focus group interviews. By means of a qualitative, phenomenological study, the focus group interviews were conducted with a convenient and purposively selected sample of primary school teachers (n = 18) in the Johannesburg South District of the Gauteng Department of Education. The interview data revealed that teachers do have an understanding of the importance of inclusive education, and appear to be knowledgeable on what the inclusive education policy entails. Furthermore, the teachers attempt to provide differentiated teaching, learning and assessment to address the wide variety of learning barriers in their classrooms. However, comprehensive knowledge about the wide variety of strategies to accommodate all learning needs appears to be lacking. The teachers noted that their training, resources and facilities are not adequate for the effective implementation of the policy principles in South African classrooms. The findings revealed that although the inclusive education policy is positively accepted by the teachers, its implementation appears to be superficial due to the cited challenges faced by the participants. The study is concluded with recommendations on how to promote the implementation of the challenging inclusive education policy principles in order to minimize the gap between policy and implementation. / MEd, Learner Support, North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, 2013
19

An evaluation of the implementation of inclusive education within mainstream schools

Dladla, Sibongile Gugu January 2004 (has links)
A dissertation submitted to the FACULTY OF EDUCATION at the UNIVERSITY OF ZULULAND in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF EDUCATION in the Department of Educational Planning and Administration, 2004. / This study was influenced by the White Paper 6 document on inclusive education. The document proposes non-discrimination of learners which is in line with South African Constitution, Act 108 of 1996 and South African Schools, Act 1996. All learners should be accommodated in the class without any discrimination against race, gender and disabilities so as to have opportunities to develop their capacities and potential, and make their full contribution to the society. The empirical study, conducted at Ndwedwe Circuit in Kwa-Zulu Natal (KZN), attempts to evaluate the implementation of inclusive education in mainstream schools. Data has been solicited from a sample population of school management teams by means of questionnaires. Both open and close-ended questions were used. The followings are reflected as key findings that emanated from the empirical study. * There is a general lack of information from school management teams about new education document relative to Inclusive Education which has -emerged recently such as Education White Paper 6 (2002). * There is a lack of teacher development programmes to capacitate the educators to effectively implement inclusive education in the mainstream schools. * There is also a shortage and/or inadequate infrastructure to support inclusive education within the mainstream schools. ^ The study also reveals that not all the respondents have appropriate knowledge or adequate information about inclusive education and effective strategies for it successful implementation. On the basis of the above findings, among others, the following key recommendations have been made. * Every educator in the mainstream schools should be adequately trained to implement Inclusive Education at the level of the classroom. * The department of education should provide meaningful and adequate support services to schools and school management teams (SMTs). * The school governing body should play an active role to promote inclusive education and training.
20

Primary school educator’s readiness for inclusive education

Mthembu, N.N. January 2009 (has links)
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree MASTER OF EDUCATION In the Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education of the Faculty of Education at the University of Zululand, 2009. / The aim of this investigation was to establish primary school educators’ readiness for inclusive education. From the literature study it emerges that inclusive education constitutes a challenge to the education system in South Africa, in particular to mainstream educators. Successful implementation of inclusive education requires educators to have the necessary knowledge, skills, competencies and support to accommodate a wide range of diversity among learners in an inclusive classroom. They must be able to select appropriate teaching strategies to achieve specific outcomes. Effective inclusion will only stay a dream if educators do not have necessary training, support system and appropriate resources. For the purpose of the empirical investigation a self-structured questionnaire, to be completed by educators from primary schools, was utilized. The data obtained from the complete questionnaires were analyzed and commented on by means of descriptive statistics. In conclusion a summary was presented on the findings of the literature review and empirical investigation and the following are some of the recommendations that were made: • Opportunities for in-service training regarding inclusive education must be made available to mainstream educators. • Pre-service training courses to address the special needs of LSEN should form part of the curriculum at institutions that train educators. The Department of Education must provide adequate support to educators concerning all aspects of inclusive education.

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