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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The Hollow Bone Hunter's Search for Sacred Space in Cyberspace: A Two World Story

Helmer, Joyce M. 29 February 2012 (has links)
The goal of this study was to examine Indigenous Teaching Circles and their applicability in an online Distance Education setting. The objectives were twofold (1) to define Aboriginal Teaching Circles as a formal method of instruction for cultural teaching in a post-secondary environment, and (2) to identify what elements of Indigenous Teaching Circles would be possible to translate into an online environment. In order to gain a better understanding of the aforementioned I interviewed seven Indigenous Knowledge Keepers who worked in post-secondary institutions and were keepers of the traditional Indigenous values and beliefs. Drawing on the stories from the participant Knowledge Keepers I define the various Indigenous Circle pedagogies and their subsequent compositions. This thesis confirms that Indigenous Teaching Circles can be conducted in a computer mediated environment with specific instructional design strategies. The most compelling finding in this thesis was the exploration of the inclusion of spiritual entities as participants in the Circles. These presences are referred to as unseen “helpers” and each of the participants interviewed commented on their existence in various ways. This concept is particularly important as these helpers were identified as residing in a virtual world therefore making teaching and learning that much more significant if one believes in this phenomenon. There is no doubt from the data collected that cultural teaching requires a shift in planning and implementation and this thesis offers some suggestions for planning and designing culturally accurate teaching and learning activities. / June- 2012
2

Retrato y Autorretrato Literario Indígena: Resistencia y Autonomía en las Américas

Arroyo, Roberto 14 January 2015 (has links)
This dissertation examines how the indigenous subject has been constructed in the Americas and explores the interests of individuals, power groups, and institutions behind these characterizations. Two notions are proposed: literary portrait and self-portrait, as opposing tendencies configuring the indigenous subject. The portrait starts as a Hispanic colonial creation that kidnaps indigenous memory, pillages natural resources and is the basis of stereotypes that still endure. Next, creoles and mestizos' portrait at the birth of Latin American nations shows the indigenous as barbarians or noble savages, enabling territorial and mental occupation of indigenous spaces and attempting to assimilate the indigenous to the new nations. A portrait of indianism emerges, idealizing and accepting the "indian" under the mestizo category, dissociated from a culture, assumed as dead or a relic of the past. The final representations are the portraits of indigenism, where the indigenous are social subjects without protagonism, and of neo-indigenism, where they are represented with a religious wisdom and power to fight against foreigners that destroy the sacred circle of nature. In radical contrast, the self-portrait defies all previous representations. Authors Enrique Sam Colop (Maya K'iché), José Luis Ayala (Aymara) and Elicura Chihuailaf (Mapuche) recover indigenous literary autonomy. Vito Apüshana (Wayúu), Briceida Cuevas (Maya Yucateca) and Natalia Toledo (Zapotec) consolidate the self-portrait at the end of the XXth and the beginning of the XXIst centuries. Self-portrait is built from tradition and reinvention of the culture, recovering indigenous agency, burying centuries of the seizure of indigenous memory and witnessing from a plural "I" their historical resistance to old and new colonialisms. This literary self-portrait accompanies the struggles for political, economic, cultural and ecological autonomy; recovers the indigenous languages as a tool for resistance, knowledge and aesthetic; uses the dominant foreign languages to form a multicultural reader; defends the notion that nature possesses a language that can be decoded; emphasizes the power of words; uses poetry as a tool for decolonization, fighting racism, and demanding equality; and values of the concept of Buen Vivir. These concepts proclaim a deep cultural transformation that is now underway. This dissertation is written in Spanish.
3

Teatro en rebeldía generador de cultura /

Merritt, Maria Torres. Betanzos, Lourdes, January 2009 (has links)
Thesis--Auburn University, 2009. / Abstract. Includes bibliographic references (p.82-87).
4

This is not a peace pipe towards an understanding of Aboriginal sovereignty /

Turner, Dale A. January 1900 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--McGill University, 1998. / Includes bibliographical references.
5

Anishinaabewaajimodaa sa: re-siting our selves home through narrative

Agger, Helen 15 February 2017 (has links)
This thesis examines the processes of discursive erasure, denial, and displacement of Namegosibii Anishinaabe historical presence on and connection to the Namegosibiing Trout Lake homelands as their heritage. Four major themes that emerge from the narratives of eight Namegosibiing community member participants clearly articulate Anishinaabe identity. These are Anishinaabemowin, Anishinaabewaadiziwin, wemitigoozhii-aadiziwin, and the noopimakamig aki boreal traditional territories. Participants’ dadibaajimowin narrative explains how the ingression of wemitigoozhi European (descended) settlers and the forces of wemitigoozhii-aadiziwin colonialism affected the ability of Namegosibii Anishinaabeg to maintain ancestral practices. Spanning several generational groups, these dadibaajimowin narratives demonstrate the need to revitalize Anishinaabe knowledge about how the aanikoobidaaganag ancestors expressed self-identity through life in the homeland territories. A critical Indigenous methodological component of this research is the extensive use of Anishinaabemowin throughout the text. Four sources of archival material, the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) records, treaty annuity pay lists (1876-1897, 1910), Canada’s 1901census, and the Butikofer Papers (2009), provide historical information about names, dates, and events that is not always a part of the Anishinaabe dadibaajimowin identity narrative. With the need for written documentation as supporting evidence, this thesis provides the kind of information that clearly demonstrates the Namegosibii Anishinaabe people’s claim to their history, identity, and inherent entitlement to the care, use, and occupation of the Namegosibiing Trout Lake homelands. / February 2017
6

Pimatisiwin : indigenous knowledge systems, our time has come

Settee, Priscilla 30 April 2007
This naturalistic inquiry explored the contributions of Indigenous Knowledge to higher learning with the intention of improving life for all Indigenous Peoples. An interdisciplinary approach was used to examine the participation of Indigenous Peoples through the disciplines of native studies, education, and health. Critical theory was used by including feminists of color, post colonialists and other scholars who examine cultural, political and intellectual domination as a means of social control.<p>Indigenous peoples represent approximately seven percent of the worlds population. They have developed knowledges that reflect their circumstances, environments and challenges and that meet the needs of peoples who for the most part have not been industrialized. Indigenous knowledges reflect the many aspects of life that make up community comprising agriculture, arts, medicines, architecture, weather and other aspects of culture such as stories, music, dance and languages. Indigenous scholars and community-based groups are integrating their knowledge into higher learning and within other educational centers. This dissertation contains our stories.<p>Storytelling was a central research tool throughout this dissertation employed to gather stories from the regions of South Africa, the Pacific, and North America who have long been active in the field of education as well as community activism. Using respectful research that paralleled the ideals of participatory action research, the overarching research question originated from the communities of the Indigenous participants. Through a polyphonic text that presents multiple voices of participants, meanings garnered through conversational interviews, focused participant observation are juxtaposed with meaning-making by the storytelling of the researcher. Critical theory problematized and critically analyzed insights into Indigenous participation within the academic community.<p>The findings for this study suggest the range of work that is to be done and as well it shares stories of how this is being undertaken in several regions in our extended global community. <p>The participants were interested and encouraged to participate collaboratively in the production of a document which asked how community based and higher learning institutes could contribute to the quality of life for Indigenous peoples and entire communities.
7

Pimatisiwin : indigenous knowledge systems, our time has come

Settee, Priscilla 30 April 2007 (has links)
This naturalistic inquiry explored the contributions of Indigenous Knowledge to higher learning with the intention of improving life for all Indigenous Peoples. An interdisciplinary approach was used to examine the participation of Indigenous Peoples through the disciplines of native studies, education, and health. Critical theory was used by including feminists of color, post colonialists and other scholars who examine cultural, political and intellectual domination as a means of social control.<p>Indigenous peoples represent approximately seven percent of the worlds population. They have developed knowledges that reflect their circumstances, environments and challenges and that meet the needs of peoples who for the most part have not been industrialized. Indigenous knowledges reflect the many aspects of life that make up community comprising agriculture, arts, medicines, architecture, weather and other aspects of culture such as stories, music, dance and languages. Indigenous scholars and community-based groups are integrating their knowledge into higher learning and within other educational centers. This dissertation contains our stories.<p>Storytelling was a central research tool throughout this dissertation employed to gather stories from the regions of South Africa, the Pacific, and North America who have long been active in the field of education as well as community activism. Using respectful research that paralleled the ideals of participatory action research, the overarching research question originated from the communities of the Indigenous participants. Through a polyphonic text that presents multiple voices of participants, meanings garnered through conversational interviews, focused participant observation are juxtaposed with meaning-making by the storytelling of the researcher. Critical theory problematized and critically analyzed insights into Indigenous participation within the academic community.<p>The findings for this study suggest the range of work that is to be done and as well it shares stories of how this is being undertaken in several regions in our extended global community. <p>The participants were interested and encouraged to participate collaboratively in the production of a document which asked how community based and higher learning institutes could contribute to the quality of life for Indigenous peoples and entire communities.
8

Counseling issues of Australian Aboriginal females

Kluetz, Amy J. January 2002 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis--PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2002. / Includes bibliographical references.
9

Taiwan Gao shan zu xian dai hua wen ti zhi yan jiu

Honda, Kenʼichi. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Zhongguo wen hua xue yuan. / Reproduced from typescript copy. Includes bibliographical references (p. 325-334).
10

Canada's Other Red Scare: rights, decolonization, and Indigenous political protest in the global sixties

RUTHERFORD, SCOTT T 30 May 2011 (has links)
This dissertation examines the histories of Indigenous protest, commonly known as “Red Power,” in the 1960s and 1970s in the town of Kenora, Ontario. Among the themes discussed are the associations of Indian and Métis activists with Third World national liberation movements, Black Power groups in North America and other Indigenous organizations, such as the American Indian Movement. This study pursues numerous themes, including: racialization, transnational decolonization, Canadian national identity and regional history. While previous studies on the era popularly understood as “the sixties” tend to focus on the particularities of the Canadian context, this dissertation suggests that the changing nature of Indigenous protest during the 1960s and 1970s forms a crucial link between Canada and global forces of social change that defined this era. Moments of Indigenous protest in Kenora, were not just singular episodes. Instead, actions such as the main street march in 1965 and the Anicinabe Park takeover in 1974 episode should be placed within the national and global movement of armed standoffs, occupations, and civil disobedience and understood through the broader social, cultural and political frameworks of decolonization during the 1960s and 1970s. / Thesis (Ph.D, History) -- Queen's University, 2011-02-23 09:01:44.534

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