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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Intimate lesbian relationships and the influence of role models and negative stereotypes

Pepper, Shanti M. January 2004 (has links)
This purpose of this study was fivefold: a)to examine the relationship between participants' reported number of positive lesbian and/or gay relationship role models their relationship outcomes (i.e., satisfaction, success, degree of closeness, and length of relationship); b) to explore the relationship between participants' level of internalized negative views of lesbian relationships and their own relationship outcomes; c) to investigate the relationship between participants' number of positive relationship role models and their level of internalized negative views of lesbian relationships; d) to examine whether participants who reported acceptance of negative stereotypes of lesbian relationships and had fewer role models also reported lower levels of interpersonal selfefficacy; e) and to investigate the relationship between participants' level of interpersonal self-efficacy and their relationship outcome (satisfaction, success, degree of closeness, and length of relationship). The study included 192 lesbian women (age 18-71 years; M = 30.6) who responded to five questionnaires: the Relationship Information Questionnaire, the Role Models Questionnaire, the Interpersonal Self-Efficacy Scale, the Internalized Negative Views of Lesbian Relationships Questionnaire, and a demographic information page. Results showed that there was no significant correlation between participants' reported number of role models and their relationship outcome (Hypothesis One). Similarly, the current study failed to find a relationship between participants' level of internalized of negative views of lesbian relationships and their own relationship outcomes (Hypothesis Two). In addition, there were no significant correlations between participants' number of positive relationship role models and their level internalized of negative views of lesbian relationships (Hypothesis Three). Furthermore, the correlation between role models and self-efficacy was not significant; however, there was a significant correlation between participants' self-efficacy and their level of internalized negative views of lesbian relationships (Hypothesis Four). The results indicated that participants' level of interpersonal self-efficacy is positively correlated with their relationship satisfaction, success, and degree of closeness. However, self-efficacy was unrelated to relationship length (Hypothesis Five). Possible explanations, limitations, and suggestions for future research are discussed. / Department of Psychological Science
2

Can I call you brother?

Unknown Date (has links)
The following manuscript is a novel intended to explore the confusing nature of butch lesbian gender identity and the unique bonds of friendship butch women often share with one another. Lesbian culture, today, sometimes puts pressure on the term butch and pushes butch women to choose between transgender, femme and androgynous. The lead character in this novel, Sarah, struggles to come to terms with her own sexual identity amidst all this pressure to conform. She watches her friends and searches for a model of what butch is and is not but she continues to feel emotionally and physically cut off from the people she cares about. Ultimately, Sarah realizes she can move fluidly between many genders. When she stops trying to be a stereotype, she is finally able to connect with the people she cares about. / by Elizabeth Andrea Norberg. / Signature page unsigned. / Thesis (M.F.A.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2009. / Includes bibliography. / Electronic reproduction. Boca Raton, Fla., 2009. Mode of access: World Wide Web.
3

The interrelationship between being lesbian and its impact on community college leadership

Andreas, Michelle 15 November 2004 (has links)
Graduation date: 2005
4

The influence of interpersonal and mass communication on attitudes toward homosexuality : a thesis ...

Traina, Michael R. 01 January 1994 (has links)
This study examined the influence of interpersonal and mass communication on heterosexual people's attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. In addition, the study examined the relationship between heterosexual people's tolerance for ambiguity, a personality factor, and their attitude toward homosexuality. Survey questionnaires were distributed to 149 heterosexual respondents at a small private university in the western United States. Three pre-existing instruments were used in the study: the Attitude Toward Homosexuality Scale (ATHS), the Index of Homophobia (IHP ), and the Multiple Stimulus Types Ambiguity Tolerance Scale (MSTAT-1). Two original instruments were also used: a set of four questions on contemporary gay issues and a survey assessing individuals' perceived sources of information on homosexuality. Frequency of both interpersonal and mass communication was found to be negatively correlated with support for gay issues. In addition, frequency of interpersonal communication was found to negatively correlate with homophobia (IHP). Tolerance of ambiguity negatively correlated with heterosexism on all measures. No statistically significant differences were found between the perceived credibility of interpersonal and mass communication sources. The results of a stepwise regression suggest that attitudes toward homosexuals can be most parsimoniously predicted by the number of acquaintances an individual has who are openly gay or lesbian and gender. Men were found to be considerably more heterosexist than women, except in the case of attitudes toward lesbians for which men's heterosexism was substantially reduced. Although a weak relationship exists between tolerance for ambiguity and attitudes toward homosexuality, tolerance of ambiguity does not appear to be a strong predictor of heterosexism. Interpersonal and mass communication sources exhibited no statistically significant residual effect on attitudes toward homosexuality after stronger predictors (number of gay acquaintances, gender, and tolerance of ambiguity) were entered into the stepwise regression. These results suggest that "coming out" may be the best means of reducing heterosexism in society.

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