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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Peace and mind religion, race, and gender among progressive intellectuals and activists /

Humphries, David January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Georgia State University, 2007. / Title from file title page. Ian Fletcher, committee chair; Jared Poley, Hugh Hudson, committee members. Electronic text (110 [i.e. 105] p.) : digital, PDF file. Pages 18, 45, 76, 77 and 95 blank. Description based on contents viewed Jan. 16, 2008. Includes bibliographical references (p. 100-110).
2

Colonisation and range expansion of inland breeding great cormorants Phalacrocorax carbo in England

Newson, Stuart E. January 2000 (has links)
No description available.
3

Microplitis croceipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae): A Life History Study and in vitro Rearing

McLoud, Laura Ann 2011 August 1900 (has links)
Microplitis croceipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is an endoparasitoid and potential biological control agent of the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), an agricultural pest. The first objective of the following research was to amend current larval life history descriptions of M. croceipes. Larval head capsule width measurements were used to distinguish instar, and exuvium in abdominal cavities of post-egression hosts were indicative of a molt during parasitoid egression. Data revealed the larvae of M. croceipes pass through five instars, rather than three, as is indicated in the literature. The second objective was to investigate the suitability of potential artificial diets to be used in in vitro rearing of M. croceipes larvae. Three concentrations each of glucose, trehalose, and protein, as well as a combination diet (derived from initial diet trials) were tested. Growth, molting, and death were noted for each diet, and data indicated that diet had a significant effect for each performance measure (p = 0.0000, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, respectively). Data also indicated that trehalose and protein were more vital to larval parasitoid development (growth and molting) than was glucose, but no larvae were reared passed the second instar on an artificial diet. The final goals of the research were to evaluate the plausibility of rearing M. croceipes larvae to adulthood in vitro and to investigate post-egression host defensive behavior. Larvae were dissected from their hosts just prior to egression and placed in a cell culture plate in previously collected host hemolymph. Larvae were able to initiate pre-egression behavior in an in vitro environment, and a small percentage (6.67%) exhibited ecdysial splitting of the cuticle, however, no larvae were able to make the final molt in vitro. Post-egression hosts exhibited defensive behavior that may suggest they play a role in protecting pupating parasitoids. When the parasitoid exuvium was pulled from the egression wound in the host, hemolymph loss occurred and duration of the defensive behavior significantly decreased (p < 0.0001), indicating the exuvium acted to plug the egression wound, which prevented the host from bleeding to death and made it possible for the host to exhibit defensive behavior.
4

Life-History Divergence and Relative Fitness of Nestling Ficedula Flycatcher Hybrids

Nonaka, Yuki January 2012 (has links)
The typical intermediate morphology of hybrids may result in their failure to utilize the same niches as their parents. However, the fitness consequences of the potentially intermediate life-history traits of hybrids have been given less scientific attention. In this study I aimed to investigate how life-history divergence in parental species affects the relative fitness of nestling hybrids resulting from crosses between collared (Ficedula albicollis) and pied flycatchers (F. hypoleuca). Previous studies showed that collared flycatcher nestlings beg more intensively and grow faster under good conditions, but are less robust against the seasonal decline in food availability compared to pied flycatcher nestlings. This life-history divergence between the species allows regional coexistence. To investigate whether the life-history divergence in flycatchers influences the relative fitness of nestling hybrids, I cross-fostered hybrid nestlings in aviaries into the nests of conspecific pairs and compared their performance. I found that the hybrids displayed intermediate growth rates between collared and pied flycatchers across the season. There might therefore be environmental conditions when hybrids perform better than purebred offspring with respect to growth and survival.
5

The life story of the plumbing retailer

Lin, Guan-jhou 22 January 2011 (has links)
This study analyzes and discusses the plumbing retailer from an individual point of view, just like a entrepreneur¡¦s point of view. The researcher focuses on the entrepreneur and adopts a life history point of view to interview the plumbing retailer. After that interview, the researcher can know the plumbing retailer¡¦s life history. Then the researcher analyzes his life history. Finally, the researcher discovers the important meaning to the plumbing retailer. The researcher has interviewed the plumbing retailer in depth for three times and has interviewed the others. Besides, the researcher has observed the business operation in the plumbing retailer¡¦s store for two weeks. According to the data, the researcher wrote the plumbing retailer¡¦s life story. Afterward the researcher has discussed the findings with my academic adviser for many times. The thesis statement has two parts as follows: The first part is the whole impression which is the pursuit of his economy. The second part has six major themes as follow: (1)undertaking the risk;(2)business vision;(3)keeping the work with great effort;(4)learning ability;(5)the role of the relations;(6)the position of the work and the family.
6

Life history tradeoffs, incubation behavior and conservation of horned larks (Eremophila alpestris)

Camfield, Alaine Francine 11 1900 (has links)
Nearly 30 percent of the earth’s terrestrial surface is mountainous and despite representing a large proportion of the planet’s protected areas, the ecology of vertebrates in high elevation areas have received little attention from researchers and managers. I studied two subspecies of horned larks (Eremophila alpestris articola and E. a. strigata) that breed at high elevation and latitude in British Columbia, Canada and at low elevation and latitude in Washington, USA, respectively. I addressed the question of how the life history of alpine breeding songbirds differs from their low elevation conspecifics and showed that life history variation can be found among closely related groups. My results were consistent with other comparative demographic studies which suggest that alpine vertebrate populations tend to show survivor life history strategies when compared to their low elevation counterparts. In addition, population growth rates were stable for E. a. articola suggesting that this subspecies is well adapted to the challenges of breeding in alpine environments. E. a. strigata, however, is declining rapidly and the remaining breeding habitats in Washington do not support stable populations. I used demographic models to show that within reasonable ranges for each vital rate (fecundity, adult and juvenile survival), management actions that target a single rate independently are unlikely to result in stable or recovering populations and management actions that target multiple vital rates should be prioritized. Finally, to further investigate adaptations of E. a. articola to alpine environments I examined how they modify their incubation behavior in response to changes in ambient temperatures which were generally well outside the optimal temperature range for normal embryonic development. Females adjusted the amount of time spent incubating by varying the frequency rather than the duration of recesses. At low ambient temperatures they appeared to shift their investment toward the survival of their eggs by increasing the total time spent on the nest instead of taking longer or more frequent foraging bouts. Overall, the results of my study indicate that alpine populations of horned larks have life history traits and breeding behaviors that allow them to persist in these areas despite the challenging breeding conditions.
7

Life history tradeoffs, incubation behavior and conservation of horned larks (Eremophila alpestris)

Camfield, Alaine Francine 11 1900 (has links)
Nearly 30 percent of the earth’s terrestrial surface is mountainous and despite representing a large proportion of the planet’s protected areas, the ecology of vertebrates in high elevation areas have received little attention from researchers and managers. I studied two subspecies of horned larks (Eremophila alpestris articola and E. a. strigata) that breed at high elevation and latitude in British Columbia, Canada and at low elevation and latitude in Washington, USA, respectively. I addressed the question of how the life history of alpine breeding songbirds differs from their low elevation conspecifics and showed that life history variation can be found among closely related groups. My results were consistent with other comparative demographic studies which suggest that alpine vertebrate populations tend to show survivor life history strategies when compared to their low elevation counterparts. In addition, population growth rates were stable for E. a. articola suggesting that this subspecies is well adapted to the challenges of breeding in alpine environments. E. a. strigata, however, is declining rapidly and the remaining breeding habitats in Washington do not support stable populations. I used demographic models to show that within reasonable ranges for each vital rate (fecundity, adult and juvenile survival), management actions that target a single rate independently are unlikely to result in stable or recovering populations and management actions that target multiple vital rates should be prioritized. Finally, to further investigate adaptations of E. a. articola to alpine environments I examined how they modify their incubation behavior in response to changes in ambient temperatures which were generally well outside the optimal temperature range for normal embryonic development. Females adjusted the amount of time spent incubating by varying the frequency rather than the duration of recesses. At low ambient temperatures they appeared to shift their investment toward the survival of their eggs by increasing the total time spent on the nest instead of taking longer or more frequent foraging bouts. Overall, the results of my study indicate that alpine populations of horned larks have life history traits and breeding behaviors that allow them to persist in these areas despite the challenging breeding conditions.
8

The value of stormwater wetlands for supporting multiple life-history stages of the wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) in the City of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Scheffers, Brett Unknown Date
No description available.
9

Sex, subjectivity and agency: A life history study of women's sexual relations and practices with men

Bryant, Joanne January 2004 (has links)
This study explores women’s experiences of sex with men. It is based on qualitative data collected from eighteen life history interviews. Such an approach provides means for examining women’s sexual experiences over time. The study finds that women give meaning to their sexual experiences through two main discursive representations: the passive, “proper” and sexually obliging girlfriend or wife, and the active and “sexually equal” woman. However, these representations do not capture the entirety of women’s sexual experiences. The life history analysis demonstrates that women are not simply inscribed by discourse. Rather, they are embodied beings actively engaged in pursuing sexual identities. Central to the process is a relationship between the practice of sex and self-reflexivity over time. Finally, the study demonstrates how the process of gaining sexual subjectivity is shaped by the material conditions of women’s lives. For instance, the praxeological circumstances of women’s class or race are powerful in recasting discourses of feminine sexuality, the meanings women ascribe to them, their access to broader sexual experiences, and the kinds of relationships they have with their male partners.
10

Motherhood and Teaching in Jamaica: A Modified Life History Approach

2015 August 1900 (has links)
This study uses a modified life history approach to gain deeper insights into the lived experiences of three teachers who became mothers while serving in Jamaica. This study was conceptualized as a result of my experiences as a teacher who became a mother. I was desirous of investigating if other teachers who became mothers in Jamaica experienced similar personal and professional transformation as a result of motherhood. The use of a life history approach necessitates an exploration of the wider historical, familial, socio-political, cultural, and economic factors influencing the lived experiences of participants and the meanings they give to their experiences. Dominant themes highlighted in the data include: the ideology that the overarching goal of education in Jamaica is for social mobility and an escape mechanism from poverty. Becoming a mother has resulted in participants taking greater levels of interest in the holistic development of students, rather than only emphasizing their academic development as they did prior to becoming mothers. Participants also developed more empathy for parents and closer collegial relationships when they became mothers. Participants’ relationships with administration were two-fold; on one hand they lobbied for improvements to their working conditions which may have a positive impact on their family life; while on the other hand, they also cared more about self-preservation in order to adequately meet the needs of their families. Motherhood also provided opportunities for participants to become more involved in various social groups in their communities. Various socio-political and economic challenges in Jamaica resulted in participants migrating to a Prairie city with their families. However, living in a multi-cultural society where they are racial minorities has presented its own challenges. Participants are negotiating the notion of home and being outsiders.

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