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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Entrepreneurial identity and capability : the role of learning

Rae, David January 2003 (has links)
No description available.
2

The Irish Goodbye

Taylor, James David 01 January 2013 (has links)
Raphael is leading a hedonistic life when he has a traumatic realization that the world is indifferent about who lives and who dies, and Raphael is no exception. This is a story, written by Raphael, about seeking to reconcile the fleeting world he and everyone else has been subjected to.
3

An Examination of How a Coach of Disability Sport Learns to Coach from and Through Experience

Duarte, Tiago 23 September 2013 (has links)
Despite the steady growth of coaching science over the last two decades, research on coaches of persons with disabilities is scarce. This study examined how an adaptive sailing coach learned through and from experience using a single case study methodology. Jarvis’s (2009) lifelong learning approach and Gilbert and Trudel’s (2001) reflective conversation model framed the thematic analysis. The findings revealed that the coach, Jenny, was exposed to collaborative environments that optimized her learning process. Social interactions with a number of people (e.g., mentors, colleagues, and athletes) possessing different types of expertise made major contributions to Jenny becoming a coach. As time progressed and Jenny was exposed to a mixture of challenges and learning situations, she advanced from recreational Para-swimming instructor to developmental adaptive sailing coach. This study informs future research in disability sport coaching.
4

An Examination of How a Coach of Disability Sport Learns to Coach from and Through Experience

Duarte, Tiago January 2013 (has links)
Despite the steady growth of coaching science over the last two decades, research on coaches of persons with disabilities is scarce. This study examined how an adaptive sailing coach learned through and from experience using a single case study methodology. Jarvis’s (2009) lifelong learning approach and Gilbert and Trudel’s (2001) reflective conversation model framed the thematic analysis. The findings revealed that the coach, Jenny, was exposed to collaborative environments that optimized her learning process. Social interactions with a number of people (e.g., mentors, colleagues, and athletes) possessing different types of expertise made major contributions to Jenny becoming a coach. As time progressed and Jenny was exposed to a mixture of challenges and learning situations, she advanced from recreational Para-swimming instructor to developmental adaptive sailing coach. This study informs future research in disability sport coaching.
5

Using a Life History Approach to Explore the Identity of a Woman Diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease: The Life of Mary

Campbell, Micah Sean 10 July 1999 (has links)
This study utilized life history as a methodological tool to explore the identity formation of Mary, a woman in her eighties who is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. The results of this study showed that Mary's sense of self was greatly influenced by her childhood experiences. Five predominate themes emerged in the interview process: Mary's admiration for her father, her willingness to share wisdom, her career as a beautician, her role as a mother, and her devotion as a wife. The Dynamical Identity Model was constructed to help further illustrate Mary's identity development and the model served as a basis to describe possible outcomes in Mary's life, as a woman diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Her story reveals that Mary has a wonderful disposition about life and, even though she was diagnosed with this disease, she does not perceive the disease as threatening. / Master of Science
6

Using Life Stories to Analyze Mathematics Teachers' Beliefs and Instructional Practices:

Hwang, Sunghwan January 2019 (has links)
Thesis advisor: Lillie R. Albert / Why do mathematics teachers’ beliefs and instructional practices differ, and why are some teachers’ beliefs aligned or misaligned with their instructional practices? This qualitative case study investigated how eight Korean elementary teachers’ sociocultural life stories shaped their mathematical beliefs and practices. The specific aim was to explore through mathematics-related life stories the relationship between the elementary teachers’ mathematical beliefs and instructional practices. The overarching research question was: “How does a theoretical model based on sociocultural theory (Albert, 2012; Vygotsky, 1978) explain the relationship among the Korean elementary teachers’ life stories, the development of their beliefs, and their instructional practices?” The findings of this study indicate that the teachers’ attribution of their unsuccessful teaching experiences contributed to their perception about the value of continuing their own learning and development, which, sequentially, influenced the construction of their current beliefs about mathematics teaching and learning. Their pedagogical beliefs for teaching mathematics were likely to have an impact on their attitude toward implementing student-centered or teacher-centered instructional practices. Additionally, the teachers’ knowledge and self-efficacy beliefs about teaching mathematics influenced this relationship, resulting in different levels of alignment and even misalignment. Thus, teachers used their past mathematics learning and teaching experiences to justify their current beliefs and practices and to explain their classroom culture. These findings resonate with scholarship pertaining to mathematics teachers’ knowledge, beliefs, and instructional practices and contribute further to their developing theory about teachers’ life stories by illustrating how teachers’ life stories play out in a complex mathematics classroom environment. / Thesis (PhD) — Boston College, 2019. / Submitted to: Boston College. Lynch School of Education. / Discipline: Teacher Education, Special Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
7

Rekonstrukce životního příběhu u mladých dospělých vystavených nepříznivému působení rodiny / The reconstruction of the life story of young adults being exposed to an adverse effect of their family

Novotná, Eliška January 2013 (has links)
The thesis deals with understanding the interpretation of life story, important people and agency in life story of young adult being expose to an adverse effect of their family. The theoretical part is focused on life story and life story work, namely methods of create life story book. The thesis defined young adult in institutional and foster care, their needs and rights. The special chapter is life story work with traumatized children. The empirical part consist of analysis of four autobiographical narratives collected by the method of narrative interview, life story book and lifeline. The collected information are analysed with holistic-content, holistic-formal and categorical-formal analysis. This work includes feedback participants in research probe reconstruction of life story and life story work. At the conclusion of work are recommended other methods for further research.
8

Perfectionism, Life Narratives, and Well-Being During Freshman Year

Mackinnon, Sean Peter 08 August 2012 (has links)
Various dimensions of perfectionism are proposed, but are seldom integrated. This research develops and tests an integrative theory of perfectionism. Theory predicts personality traits (perfectionistic concerns, but not perfectionistic strivings) precede and predict changes in characteristic adaptations (perfectionistic self-presentation and perfectionism cognitions). Theory also predicts characteristic adaptations precede and predict decreases in subjective well-being (SWB), and are associated with a particular patterned form of perfectionistic narrative identity (i.e., heightened agency and lowered communion). This research tests this integrative theory. A sample of 127 emerging adults (ages 18-25) transitioning to university for the first time was recruited (78% female; 81% Caucasian). A 3-wave, 130-day longitudinal design with quantitative and qualitative components was used. Participants completed questionnaire measures of perfectionism and subjective well-being at all waves, and completed semi-structured life story interviews at Waves 1 and 3. Interviews were transcribed and coded for themes of agency (i.e., themes of achievement, status, power, and self-mastery) and communion (i.e., themes of love, dialogue, caring, and community). Results are presented in Chapters 2, 4 and 5. In Chapter 2, perfectionistic concerns led to increased perfectionistic self-presentation, which in turn led to decreases in SWB. In contrast, perfectionistic strivings did not predict longitudinal change in perfectionistic self-presentation or SWB. These findings supported hypotheses. In Chapter 4, perfectionistic concerns and perfectionism cognitions were positively correlated with agency. Perfectionism cognitions mediated the relationship between perfectionistic concerns and agency. A qualitative thematic analysis revealed themes of agency focused on performance-related concerns, with undertones of self-doubt and unrealistic high standards. These findings supported hypotheses. In Chapter 5, perfectionistic concerns and SWB were unrelated to communion, contrary to expectations. However, themes of communion exhibited good inter-rater reliability, test-retest reliability, and face validity. Hypotheses regarding communion were not supported. Overall, most hypotheses were supported. By conceptualizing perfectionistic personality as a dynamic, multifaceted, and integrated system, there are numerous implications for developmental, clinical, and personality psychology. These implications, along with the strengths and limitations of this study, are discussed.
9

<i>Maskosis</i> the healing journey of Little Bear : a narrative analysis of the life of an Aboriginal man with quadriplegia

Lloyd, Karen Elizabeth 19 March 2008
A narrative analysis was used to explore the question, What does it mean to be an Aboriginal man with quadriplegia? Six in-depth semi-structured interviews and follow-up reviews were conducted with Dennis Sapp, a 52-year old Plains Cree man with quadriplegia who requested that his full name be used in the thesis document. <p>The results of the study appear in the form of a life story written in the first person derived through a process of narrative analysis of the interview transcripts. The narrative details Dennis early beginnings on the Little Pine Reserve near North Battleford, Saskatchewan, Canada and his memories of his maternal grandfather, Cree elder and WWII Veteran, Tom Sapp, who raised Dennis in the traditional way until he was forced to go to the St. Anthonys Residential School at Onion Lake at six years of age. The narrative includes an account of Dennis life before being taken to residential school, his experiences at residential school, and his life after leaving the school. In the narrative Dennis recounts the experience of losing his traditional culture and spirituality at residential school and the difficulties he encountered in his life as a result of the trauma of the residential school experience. He gives an account of sustaining a spinal cord injury and his experience post-injury and in rehabilitation. After reconnecting with his grandfather and returning to school to complete his education, Dennis rediscovered his traditional culture and spirituality and gained a renewed sense of meaning and purpose as a counsellor, disabilities advocate, and storyteller. Through regaining his culture and spirituality and sharing his story Dennis found balance and healing.
10

<i>Maskosis</i> the healing journey of Little Bear : a narrative analysis of the life of an Aboriginal man with quadriplegia

Lloyd, Karen Elizabeth 19 March 2008 (has links)
A narrative analysis was used to explore the question, What does it mean to be an Aboriginal man with quadriplegia? Six in-depth semi-structured interviews and follow-up reviews were conducted with Dennis Sapp, a 52-year old Plains Cree man with quadriplegia who requested that his full name be used in the thesis document. <p>The results of the study appear in the form of a life story written in the first person derived through a process of narrative analysis of the interview transcripts. The narrative details Dennis early beginnings on the Little Pine Reserve near North Battleford, Saskatchewan, Canada and his memories of his maternal grandfather, Cree elder and WWII Veteran, Tom Sapp, who raised Dennis in the traditional way until he was forced to go to the St. Anthonys Residential School at Onion Lake at six years of age. The narrative includes an account of Dennis life before being taken to residential school, his experiences at residential school, and his life after leaving the school. In the narrative Dennis recounts the experience of losing his traditional culture and spirituality at residential school and the difficulties he encountered in his life as a result of the trauma of the residential school experience. He gives an account of sustaining a spinal cord injury and his experience post-injury and in rehabilitation. After reconnecting with his grandfather and returning to school to complete his education, Dennis rediscovered his traditional culture and spirituality and gained a renewed sense of meaning and purpose as a counsellor, disabilities advocate, and storyteller. Through regaining his culture and spirituality and sharing his story Dennis found balance and healing.

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