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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Male body image: testosterone's response to body comparisons

Brown, Joshua D. 16 August 2006 (has links)
Although there have been only a few etiological studies that have examined the development and maintenance of body image in males, research fairly consistently reports that exposure and presumed comparison to images of ideal male bodies increases body dissatisfaction. Social comparison provides individuals with a mechanism by which to evaluate their body appearance to those around them. When individuals compare their bodies to those of others, they are attempting to gauge their standing or status relative to those around them, the results of which have inherent status implications. There is increasing empirical evidence that suggests perceived increases in status result in increased testosterone levels, whereas testosterone decreases when status is perceived as having been diminished. Thus, the core of the present study: can the process of comparing the appearance of one’s body to that of others affect the testosterone levels, body satisfaction, and mood of males? To examine the above research questions, a two-part study was designed. A pilot study was conducted with 117 male undergraduates primarily to examine the psychometrics of measures to be used in the main study. The measures appeared psychometrically sound and were thus used in the main study. In the main study, 129 male undergraduates were exposed to photographs of one of three male body types (i.e., lean/muscular, skinny, average) to determine whether or not exposure to the different body types differentially affected participants’ testosterone levels, body satisfaction, and mood. Results indicate that testosterone levels decreased over the course of the experiment in each of the three groups; however, the body type to which participants were exposed did not differentially affect participants’ testosterone levels. Body dissatisfaction was greater among participants who viewed lean/muscular bodies than those who viewed average bodies. Lastly, mood was not differentially affected by viewing different types of male bodies. Implications and possible explanations for these results are discussed.
2

Assuming the 'feminine' position : erotic masculinities and the visual representation of sexual difference

Curtin, Brian Anthony January 2000 (has links)
No description available.
3

Victor’s Body : Male Hysteria and Homoeroticism in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Kenneth Branagh’s Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Kerren, Ulla January 2014 (has links)
This thesis investigates the male body in Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein, first published in 1818, and Kenneth Branagh’s film Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, released in 1994. So doing, the thesis focuses on the analysis of hysteria and homoeroticism in three male-male relationships: Victor and the monster, Victor and Walton, and Victor and Clerval. The main argument claims that, in the novel, Victor Frankenstein displays symptoms of male hysteria, which result from his repressing homoerotic desire and give evidence of male embodiment. It is not possible for Victor to repress bodily needs in the long run, and he experiences and reacts to the world with his body and mind. In the film, on the other hand, Victor’s heterosexuality is emphasised and he is depicted as a strong, powerful man rather than a nervous member of the upper class. The divergences between the representations of the male body in the primary texts, the thesis argues, reflect different ideas about the male body in the 1810s and 1990s. Although the image of the muscular and masculine, heterosexual man that was prevalent in the 1990s was already in the making in the 1810s, it was not as consolidated. The discussion of masculinity from a historical perspective makes use of Michel Foucault’s outline of the history of sexuality, Mark S. Micale’s account of hysteria and George L. Mosse’s ideas about masculinity. For a differentiated analysis of male-male relationships, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s continuum of male homosocial desire is drawn on.
4

Assessing Male Body Image: Development and Validation of the Appearance Inventory for Men (AIM)

Agliata, Daniel 01 August 2005 (has links)
Despite evidence suggesting that appearance dissatisfaction among men is on the rise, a void in appropriate forms of body image assessment for males remains. The current study reviews the literature on male body image, identifying the shortcomings and limitations of prior research, and introduces a psychometrically sound, male-specific body image assessment. An initial item-generation study was used to poll 253 males to inquire about their concerns, emotions, behaviors, and related body image topics to be sorted and synthesized into items for scale inclusion. The newly developed Appearance Inventory for Men (AIM) was then administered to 330 males and submitted to exploratory factor analyses, revealing a relatively stable three-factor structure. Weight-Focus (WF), Muscle Focus (MF), and Appearance Motivation (AM) factors emerged, all with good internal consistency and convergent, discriminant, and construct validity. Two additional psychometrically sound subscales were included in the final AIM that assess body area satisfaction for men (Key Attributes of Muscularity; KAM) and the common Strategies for Appearance Management (SAM). Future research and clinical implications are discussed, as are the directions for continued validation of this unique, yet much needed male-specific body image assessment tool. / Ph.D. / Department of Psychology / Arts and Sciences / Psychology
5

Individual differences and the effects of viewing ideal media portrayals on body satisfaction and drive for muscularity : testing new moderators for men

Hobza, Cody Layne 05 November 2013 (has links)
Historically, cultural pressures to be thin and their effects on women (e.g., body dissatisfaction, disordered eating) have received considerable attention from researchers and clinicians. However, acknowledgement of cultural pressures on men to be muscular and lean is much more recent, as are men's increasing rates of body dissatisfaction and body-changing behaviors (i.e., drive for muscularity, nutritional supplement/steroid use, excessive weightlifting). The increasing presence of idealized lean, muscular men in the media may be one of the influences on men's increasing body dissatisfaction, although studies examining the relationship between viewing these idealized portrayals and men's drive for muscularity/body satisfaction have yielded mixed results. Additionally, individual difference factors that may influence this relationship need further investigation. The purpose of this study was to address these two areas of research. It was hypothesized that men exposed to idealized television portrayals of lean, muscular men would report higher muscle/body fat dissatisfaction and drive for muscularity attitudes scores compared to men exposed to television portrayals of average-looking men. Additionally, it was predicted that men who report higher perfectionism, neuroticism, and drive for muscularity, and who more strongly endorse traditional attitudes about the male role, would report higher drive for muscularity and muscle/body fat dissatisfaction at post-test compared to men who report lower perfectionism, neuroticism, and drive for muscularity, and who are less concerned with traditional male role norms. Two-hundred-thirty-five undergraduate men at The University of Texas at Austin participated in the online study. During Phase 1, participants completed questionnaires assessing drive for muscularity, muscle/body fat dissatisfaction, perfectionism, neuroticism, and attitudes about the male role. One week later, they were randomly assigned to either the muscular-image or average-image group to complete Phase 2. After viewing television commercials corresponding with their experimental groups, participants again completed all pre-test measures. Results suggested that men in the average-image group (rather than the muscular-image group) with high drive for muscularity experienced greater body fat dissatisfaction than men with low drive for muscularity. Interesting findings regarding the relationships among perfectionism, neuroticism and drive for muscularity/body dissatisfaction also emerged. Implications of the study, strengths, limitations and suggestions for future research are discussed. / text
6

The anxious actor

Logan, Zachari John 25 November 2008
The collection of paintings and drawings constituting the thesis exhibition The Anxious Actor are rooted within the visual language of contemporary realist figurative painting and drawing, with a focus on the male body. Traditionally in western culture, the depiction of the human form, both male and female, has sought to reinforce hierarchical constructions and meta-narratives implicit in religious and imperialistic structures. I paint and draw my own body as subject, exploring personal narratives that contradict these pre-existing notions. As a queer man interested in the vocabulary of realist figurative painting, my body is a catalyst for my fascination with stereotypic masculine portrayals.<p> Utilizing historic themes of male bravado, heroism and narcissism I juxtapose the mundane realities of everyday contemporary life. My narratives are situated within the complex visual languages of Neo-classical, Baroque, Rococo and Renaissance style painting. These specific pictorial vocabularies add both psychological and metaphoric weight to my conceptual process; locating my marginalized identity within historic and contemporary archetypes.
7

The anxious actor

Logan, Zachari John 25 November 2008 (has links)
The collection of paintings and drawings constituting the thesis exhibition The Anxious Actor are rooted within the visual language of contemporary realist figurative painting and drawing, with a focus on the male body. Traditionally in western culture, the depiction of the human form, both male and female, has sought to reinforce hierarchical constructions and meta-narratives implicit in religious and imperialistic structures. I paint and draw my own body as subject, exploring personal narratives that contradict these pre-existing notions. As a queer man interested in the vocabulary of realist figurative painting, my body is a catalyst for my fascination with stereotypic masculine portrayals.<p> Utilizing historic themes of male bravado, heroism and narcissism I juxtapose the mundane realities of everyday contemporary life. My narratives are situated within the complex visual languages of Neo-classical, Baroque, Rococo and Renaissance style painting. These specific pictorial vocabularies add both psychological and metaphoric weight to my conceptual process; locating my marginalized identity within historic and contemporary archetypes.
8

Body image in men : drive for muscularity and social influences, body image evaluation and investment, and psychological well-being

Peterson, Cherie 30 March 2007
Over the past decade, the study of male body image has increased considerably and substantial levels of body discontent among males have been reported. Accompanying this dissatisfaction is a rise in the documentation of the Drive for Muscularity (DFM), or the desire for increased lean muscle mass, in men. The current study had three objectives. The first was to identify theoretical variables associated with the DFM. The second was to examine body image evaluation and investment in relation to the DFM. The third was to explore the DFM and psychological well-being. Two-hundred fourteen men completed the study and multiple regressions were carried out to examine the various relations. Awareness and internalization of the male body ideal and universalistic social comparison accounted for 35% of the variance in the DFM. Body image investment, but not evaluation, accounted for 26% of the variance in the DFM. Regarding psychological well-being, the DFM accounted for an additional 23% of the variance in muscle pathology after controlling for levels of depression and self-esteem. Other notable findings included mens self-reported intentions to use potentially unhealthy body change strategies to increase size and musculature in the future, and statistically significant associations between the DFM and self-esteem, social physique anxiety, and general worry. These results contribute to the growing literature on male body image and the implications for clinical practice with men presenting with body dissatisfaction are discussed.
9

Body image in men : drive for muscularity and social influences, body image evaluation and investment, and psychological well-being

Peterson, Cherie 30 March 2007 (has links)
Over the past decade, the study of male body image has increased considerably and substantial levels of body discontent among males have been reported. Accompanying this dissatisfaction is a rise in the documentation of the Drive for Muscularity (DFM), or the desire for increased lean muscle mass, in men. The current study had three objectives. The first was to identify theoretical variables associated with the DFM. The second was to examine body image evaluation and investment in relation to the DFM. The third was to explore the DFM and psychological well-being. Two-hundred fourteen men completed the study and multiple regressions were carried out to examine the various relations. Awareness and internalization of the male body ideal and universalistic social comparison accounted for 35% of the variance in the DFM. Body image investment, but not evaluation, accounted for 26% of the variance in the DFM. Regarding psychological well-being, the DFM accounted for an additional 23% of the variance in muscle pathology after controlling for levels of depression and self-esteem. Other notable findings included mens self-reported intentions to use potentially unhealthy body change strategies to increase size and musculature in the future, and statistically significant associations between the DFM and self-esteem, social physique anxiety, and general worry. These results contribute to the growing literature on male body image and the implications for clinical practice with men presenting with body dissatisfaction are discussed.
10

Apolo, Narciso e Dion?sio: o corpo masculino na Revista Mens Health

Eufr?sio, Jos? Jefferson Gomes 04 February 2013 (has links)
Made available in DSpace on 2014-12-17T14:44:16Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 JoseJGE_DISSERT.pdf: 3203308 bytes, checksum: ea9e9f657e3486563834d14ca2dc526d (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-02-04 / Esta pesquisa aborda a rela??o entre o corpo e a est?tica, compreendida como padr?o corporal, com o objetivo de analisar o corpo masculino na Revista Men?s Health. A Revista em pauta ? uma publica??o mensal da Editora Abril, estando presente em mais de 43 pa?ses. A metodologia utilizada ? a an?lise de conte?do como proposta por Bardin (1979), visando identificar sentidos sobre o corpo masculino divulgado nessa m?dia, especificamente na se??o Fitness. O corpus de an?lise foi composto por 12 edi??es da revista, veiculadas de janeiro a dezembro do ano 2011. Elaboramos fichas de identifica??o para todas as mat?rias contidas no sum?rio da Se??o Fitness e, em seguida, fizemos os perfis das mat?rias construindo cinco categorias tem?ticas: Apar?ncia, Investimentos no corpo, Individualismo, Consumo, Bem-estar. A Men?s Health, atrav?s de suas imagens e discursos, apresenta v?rios conselhos e recomenda??es que apontam caminhos e atitudes a serem seguidos, influenciando o homem a ser jovem, belo e saud?vel. A partir da an?lise realizada, pode-se afirmar que na Revista Men?s Health a apar?ncia encontra-se ligada a uma ideia de um corpo magro e musculoso. Para a obten??o do corpo propagado pela revista, s?o necess?rios v?rios investimentos e pr?ticas de consumo. Nota-se ainda que o discurso do bem-estar e da felicidade utiliza a publicidade para incentivar os leitores a comprar as novidades lan?adas pela sociedade de consumo

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