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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Complex sentence formation in Maori

Reedy, Tamati Muturangi January 1979 (has links)
Photocopy of typescript. / Bibliography: p. 306-311. / xiv, 311 leaves ill. 29 cm
2

Māori language use in New Zealand secondary schools : what are the issues for teachers and students? : a thesis submitted to the Victoria University of Wellington in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Māori Studies /

Tito, Janie. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Victoria University of Wellington, 2008. / Includes bibliographical references.
3

Te Ao o te whaikōrero

Rewi, Poia, n/a January 2005 (has links)
Te Ao o te Whaikōrero, the �world of Māori oratory�, explores the complexity of ̂Māori oratory, both past and present. What makes whaikōrero more than merely a theatrical speech is the origin and function of the various components, the rites associated with the selection and qualification of its exponents, and its delivery. This thesis delves into the underlying philosophies inherent in whaikōrero which impact on, and are influenced by, a diverse range of systems within the Māori world, its culture, etiquette, and belief system. We must also recognise the effect of colonisation and urbanisation on Māori practices. Whaikōrero is tragically undermined by some of its �performers� and observers alike, and possibly, through ignorance, arrogance and complacency, a sense of disregard has developed about its true value. The effect of this is whaikōrero of inferior quality. With this in mind, this thesis expounds the �underlying philosophies� of whaikōrero through both oral and literary sources, as well as objective and subjective discussion. The chapters illustrate the inter-tribal, intra-tribal, and individual variations which make each delivery of whaikōrero unique. The thesis begins with the origin of whaikōrero, after which modes of learning and the acquisition of whaikōrero are discussed. This provides the basis to discuss the locations where whaikōrero takes place and who is permitted to deliver whaikōrero. Having designated the people to deliver whaikōrero and their �space� for delivery there is an exploration of the speaker, and the attributes which qualify a particular individual, or the type of delivery that is acceptable. The issue of �quality�, or lack of it, is of paramount importance in terms of the mana of the individual performer, and the people (s)he represents. The range of information discussed up to this point is historical and tracks the evolution of whaikōrero to the present; the conclusion, therefore, also addresses some of the issues raised which are potentially challenging in regard to current adherence to custom and etiquette. This opens the window into the future of whaikōrero, and what adaptations may lie ahead. Perhaps with broader, and more in-depth discussion, and in particular, the explanation of the diversity of whaikōrero, this thesis will provide a) a means by which the spirit of older whaikōrero can be reinvested in the modern context by current and potential orators, and b) raise the awareness of speakers whereby they themselves can seek excellence in their own whaikōrero. Perhaps with an invigorated approach to both the delivery, observance, and a more informed appreciation of whaikōrero, there will be a resurgence of excellence in whaikōrero.
4

Community Contexts of Bilingual Education:A Study of Six South Island Primary School Programmes

Jacques, Kathleen January 1991 (has links)
Community Contexts of Maori-English Bilingual Education is a multi-case study of six primary school bilingual programmes located throughout the South Island. These six programmes comprised the total number of programmes officially designated by the (former) Department of Education as bilingual and which were administered from the Southern Regional Office of the Department. Each of these programmes employed the services of a kaiarahi reo and had been in operation for at least one school year at the beginning of Term I, 1989. The focus of the study is the interlocking sociocultural and pedagogical contexts which affect, and which, in turn, are affected by the recent inclusion of Maori as a language of instruction within the New Zealand public school system. The material presented in this report resulted from quantitative and qualitative study over an eighteen month period commencing in February, 1989. Data collection techniques included interviews, classroom observations and questionnaire surveys which were used to compile base-line data on the numbers and backgrounds of pupils enrolled in the programmes, classroom practices, perceptions of parents and school staff and outcomes of the programmes. The research also included a number of interviews with affiliated personnel such as Kohanga Reo parents and staff, local kaumatua, and officials from the Ministry and Department of Education. A number of issues are covered in the study; including the rationales for establishing programmes, staffing policies and procedures, resource allocation, bilingual teaching methodology, the range and depth of bilingual and bicultural innovation, community involvement and levels of satisfaction and concern with the programmes.
5

Te Ao o te whaikōrero

Rewi, Poia, n/a January 2005 (has links)
Te Ao o te Whaikōrero, the �world of Māori oratory�, explores the complexity of ̂Māori oratory, both past and present. What makes whaikōrero more than merely a theatrical speech is the origin and function of the various components, the rites associated with the selection and qualification of its exponents, and its delivery. This thesis delves into the underlying philosophies inherent in whaikōrero which impact on, and are influenced by, a diverse range of systems within the Māori world, its culture, etiquette, and belief system. We must also recognise the effect of colonisation and urbanisation on Māori practices. Whaikōrero is tragically undermined by some of its �performers� and observers alike, and possibly, through ignorance, arrogance and complacency, a sense of disregard has developed about its true value. The effect of this is whaikōrero of inferior quality. With this in mind, this thesis expounds the �underlying philosophies� of whaikōrero through both oral and literary sources, as well as objective and subjective discussion. The chapters illustrate the inter-tribal, intra-tribal, and individual variations which make each delivery of whaikōrero unique. The thesis begins with the origin of whaikōrero, after which modes of learning and the acquisition of whaikōrero are discussed. This provides the basis to discuss the locations where whaikōrero takes place and who is permitted to deliver whaikōrero. Having designated the people to deliver whaikōrero and their �space� for delivery there is an exploration of the speaker, and the attributes which qualify a particular individual, or the type of delivery that is acceptable. The issue of �quality�, or lack of it, is of paramount importance in terms of the mana of the individual performer, and the people (s)he represents. The range of information discussed up to this point is historical and tracks the evolution of whaikōrero to the present; the conclusion, therefore, also addresses some of the issues raised which are potentially challenging in regard to current adherence to custom and etiquette. This opens the window into the future of whaikōrero, and what adaptations may lie ahead. Perhaps with broader, and more in-depth discussion, and in particular, the explanation of the diversity of whaikōrero, this thesis will provide a) a means by which the spirit of older whaikōrero can be reinvested in the modern context by current and potential orators, and b) raise the awareness of speakers whereby they themselves can seek excellence in their own whaikōrero. Perhaps with an invigorated approach to both the delivery, observance, and a more informed appreciation of whaikōrero, there will be a resurgence of excellence in whaikōrero.
6

An intervention approach to target vocabulary development in te reo Maori in Maori immersion settings : a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Speech Language Therapy in the University of Canterbury /

Gallagher, Kerrie Louise. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.L.T.)--University of Canterbury, 2008. / Typescript (photocopy). "March 2008." Includes bibliographical references (leaves 58-62). Also available via the World Wide Web.
7

A criterion referenced analysis and evaluation of the processes involved in formulating a Māori language regeneration strategy for Whakamārama marae

Lewis, Roger Brian. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Waikato, 2007. / Title from PDF cover (viewed April 1, 2008) Includes bibliographical references (p. 143-153)
8

Planning for tolerability : promoting positive attitudes and behaviours towards the Māori language among non-Māori New Zealanders : a thesis submitted to the Victoria University of Wellington in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Linguistics /

De Bres, Julia. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Victoria University of Wellington, 2008. / Includes bibliographical references.
9

Eke ki runga i te waka : the use of dominant metaphors by newly-fluent Māori speakers in historical perspective : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Linguistics in the University of Canterbury /

King, Jeanette, January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Canterbury, 2007. / Typescript (photocopy). Includes bibliographical references (leaves 353-374). Also available via the World Wide Web.
10

An Intervention Approach to Target Vocabulary Development in Te Reo Maori in Maori Immersion Settings

Gallagher, Kerrie Louise January 2008 (has links)
The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a storybook retell technique to facilitate vocabulary acquisition in children educated in Māori immersion class settings. A second aim of the study was to explore the cultural responsiveness and pedagogical appropriateness of the intervention approach and the importance of relationship building (whakawhanaungatanga) to successful interventions. Nine children participated in the study. These children (aged between 5 and 8 years) were recruited from two Kura Kaupapa Māori settings in differing urban areas in New Zealand. The children entered the study on a rolling basis in groups of three. The first three participants to enter the study were recruited from the one classroom on the basis of their demonstrating specific language impairment (SLI). The second group of three participants attended a different classroom and these participants were recruited into the study as a result of identified delayed reading development (RD). The third group of three participants from a third classroom was selected as the participants exhibited typical spoken and written language development (TD). The intervention technique utilized in this study adopted a structured approach to teaching the meaning of pre selected vocabulary items that were embedded in class story books. Three different books were selected and each book was read by the teacher to the whole class three times during a one week period. The target vocabulary was highlighted each time it occurred in the story through the following techniques: an adult definition was given for the word, an antonym or synonym was given, and the meaning was acted out by the teacher or the picture detailing the meaning of the word in the book was highlighted. A single subject research design using pre-intervention, intervention and post intervention assessment probes for the target vocabulary items was employed to examine the effectiveness of the intervention in teaching the children the targeted vocabulary. Teacher interviews were also carried out to assess the appropriateness of the intervention in relation to the philosophy of the Kura Kaupapa and its pedagogical appropriateness and cultural responsiveness. The results suggested that the children in all three groups (SLI, RD and TD) made moderate gains in the acquisition of the target vocabulary supporting the hypothesis that targeting vocabulary in story book retelling at a whole class level will lead to acquisition of the vocabulary by the participants' exposed to the intervention. However, using a Two Standard Deviation method to evaluate the significance of each participant's change, the gains made for the RD and SLI participants were not significant. The TD participants did demonstrate a significant difference in the number of words correct. The teachers of the participants involved in the study reported positively on the effectiveness and appropriateness of the intervention for inclusion within the Kura Kaupapa and classroom programme. In particular, teachers' reported that as the intervention included each child in the class (as opposed to a withdrawal intervention model) the intervention was more appropriate for the philosophy of the Kura Kaupapa. The teachers' also reported the effectiveness of the intervention for the development of collaboration and relationship building between the teacher and researcher (a speech-language therapist. The data showed that the intervention investigated in this study was culturally responsive and pedagogically appropriate. It could be included as a component of the class programme as it was responsive to the philosophy of the Kura Kaupapa. The participants' did make moderate gains in the acquisition of the vocabulary (although not at a level to be considered significant for children with delayed development). Further research is necessary to explore the effectiveness of what may potentially be a useful intervention to enhance vocabulary development for children in Kura Kaupapa.

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