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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Collaborative research stories : whakawhanaungatanga

Bishop, Alan Russell, n/a January 1995 (has links)
This thesis seeks to acknowledge and address the concerns that Maori people voice about research into their lives. The present study shows that Maori people are concerned that the power and control over research issues of initiation, benefits, representation, legitimation and accountability are addressed by the imposition of the researcher�s agenda, concerns and interests on the research process. Such dominance of a Western orientated discourse is being challenged by a pro-active, Kaupapa Maori research approach. This approach is part of the revitalisation of Maori cultural aspirations, preferences and practices as a philosophical and productive educational stance and resistance to the hegemony of the dominant discourse in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Kaupapa Maori research is collectivistic, and is orientated toward benefiting all the research participants and their collectively determined agendas. Kaupapa Maori Research is based on growing concensus that research involving Maori knowledge and people needs to be conducted in culturally appropriate ways, ways that fit Maori cultural preferences, practices and aspirations in order to develop and acknowledge existing culturally appropriate approaches in the method, practice and organisation of research. This thesis examines how a group of researchers have addressed the importance of devolving power and control in the research exercise in order to promote self-determination (tino Rangatiratanga) of Maori people. In the thesis I have talked with researchers who have accepted the challenge of positioning themselves within the discursive practice that is Kaupapa Maori. As a result, this thesis examines how such positionings challenge what constitutes a process of theory generation within the context of Aotearoa/New Zealand. This thesis further seeks to examine a way of knowing that reflects what meanings I can construct from my positioning within an experiential Kaupapa Maori research matrix. My position within this matrix resulted from critical reflections on my participation in a research group with an agreed-to agenda, my participation within the projects considered in the narratives in this thesis, my talking with other research participants in the form termed "interviews as chat" and from our constructing joint narratives about their/our attempts to address Maori concerns about research in their practice. The broad methodological framework used in the thesis is narrative inquiry for such an approach allows the research participants to select, recollect and reflect on stories within their own cultural context and language rather than in that chosen by the researcher. In other words, the story teller maintains the power to define what constitutes the story and the truth and the meaning it has for them. Further, this thesis seeks to investigate my own position as a researcher within a co-joint reflection on shared experiences and co-joint construction of meanings about these experiences, a position where the stories of the other research participants merged with my own to create new stories. Such collaborative stories go beyond an approach that simply focusses on the cooperative sharing of experiences and focusses on connectedness, engagement, and involvement with the other research participants within the cultural world view/discursive practice within which they function. This thesis seeks to identify what constitutes this engagement and what implications this has for promoting self determination/agency/voice in the research participants by examining concepts of participatory consciousness and connectedness within Maori discursive practice. Whakawhanaungatanga (establishing relationships in a Maori context), is used metaphorically to give voice to a culturally positioned means of collaboratively constructing research stories in a �culturally conscious and connected manner�. The thesis explains that there are three major overlapping implications of whakawhanaungatanga as a research strategy. The first is that establishing and maintaining relationships is a fundamental, often extensive and ongoing part of the research process. This involves the establishment of �whanau of interest� through a process of �spiral dicourse�. The second is that researchers understand themselves to be involved somatically in the research process; that is physically, ethically, morally and spiritually and not just as a �researcher� concerned with methodology. Such positionings are demonstrated in the language/metaphor used by the researchers in the stories described in this thesis. The third is that establishing relationships in a Maori context addresses the power and control issues fundamental to research, because it involves participatory research practices, in this context, termed �Participant Driven research�.
2

Collaborative research stories : whakawhanaungatanga

Bishop, Alan Russell, n/a January 1995 (has links)
This thesis seeks to acknowledge and address the concerns that Maori people voice about research into their lives. The present study shows that Maori people are concerned that the power and control over research issues of initiation, benefits, representation, legitimation and accountability are addressed by the imposition of the researcher�s agenda, concerns and interests on the research process. Such dominance of a Western orientated discourse is being challenged by a pro-active, Kaupapa Maori research approach. This approach is part of the revitalisation of Maori cultural aspirations, preferences and practices as a philosophical and productive educational stance and resistance to the hegemony of the dominant discourse in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Kaupapa Maori research is collectivistic, and is orientated toward benefiting all the research participants and their collectively determined agendas. Kaupapa Maori Research is based on growing concensus that research involving Maori knowledge and people needs to be conducted in culturally appropriate ways, ways that fit Maori cultural preferences, practices and aspirations in order to develop and acknowledge existing culturally appropriate approaches in the method, practice and organisation of research. This thesis examines how a group of researchers have addressed the importance of devolving power and control in the research exercise in order to promote self-determination (tino Rangatiratanga) of Maori people. In the thesis I have talked with researchers who have accepted the challenge of positioning themselves within the discursive practice that is Kaupapa Maori. As a result, this thesis examines how such positionings challenge what constitutes a process of theory generation within the context of Aotearoa/New Zealand. This thesis further seeks to examine a way of knowing that reflects what meanings I can construct from my positioning within an experiential Kaupapa Maori research matrix. My position within this matrix resulted from critical reflections on my participation in a research group with an agreed-to agenda, my participation within the projects considered in the narratives in this thesis, my talking with other research participants in the form termed "interviews as chat" and from our constructing joint narratives about their/our attempts to address Maori concerns about research in their practice. The broad methodological framework used in the thesis is narrative inquiry for such an approach allows the research participants to select, recollect and reflect on stories within their own cultural context and language rather than in that chosen by the researcher. In other words, the story teller maintains the power to define what constitutes the story and the truth and the meaning it has for them. Further, this thesis seeks to investigate my own position as a researcher within a co-joint reflection on shared experiences and co-joint construction of meanings about these experiences, a position where the stories of the other research participants merged with my own to create new stories. Such collaborative stories go beyond an approach that simply focusses on the cooperative sharing of experiences and focusses on connectedness, engagement, and involvement with the other research participants within the cultural world view/discursive practice within which they function. This thesis seeks to identify what constitutes this engagement and what implications this has for promoting self determination/agency/voice in the research participants by examining concepts of participatory consciousness and connectedness within Maori discursive practice. Whakawhanaungatanga (establishing relationships in a Maori context), is used metaphorically to give voice to a culturally positioned means of collaboratively constructing research stories in a �culturally conscious and connected manner�. The thesis explains that there are three major overlapping implications of whakawhanaungatanga as a research strategy. The first is that establishing and maintaining relationships is a fundamental, often extensive and ongoing part of the research process. This involves the establishment of �whanau of interest� through a process of �spiral dicourse�. The second is that researchers understand themselves to be involved somatically in the research process; that is physically, ethically, morally and spiritually and not just as a �researcher� concerned with methodology. Such positionings are demonstrated in the language/metaphor used by the researchers in the stories described in this thesis. The third is that establishing relationships in a Maori context addresses the power and control issues fundamental to research, because it involves participatory research practices, in this context, termed �Participant Driven research�.
3

An Intervention Approach to Target Vocabulary Development in Te Reo Maori in Maori Immersion Settings

Gallagher, Kerrie Louise January 2008 (has links)
The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a storybook retell technique to facilitate vocabulary acquisition in children educated in Māori immersion class settings. A second aim of the study was to explore the cultural responsiveness and pedagogical appropriateness of the intervention approach and the importance of relationship building (whakawhanaungatanga) to successful interventions. Nine children participated in the study. These children (aged between 5 and 8 years) were recruited from two Kura Kaupapa Māori settings in differing urban areas in New Zealand. The children entered the study on a rolling basis in groups of three. The first three participants to enter the study were recruited from the one classroom on the basis of their demonstrating specific language impairment (SLI). The second group of three participants attended a different classroom and these participants were recruited into the study as a result of identified delayed reading development (RD). The third group of three participants from a third classroom was selected as the participants exhibited typical spoken and written language development (TD). The intervention technique utilized in this study adopted a structured approach to teaching the meaning of pre selected vocabulary items that were embedded in class story books. Three different books were selected and each book was read by the teacher to the whole class three times during a one week period. The target vocabulary was highlighted each time it occurred in the story through the following techniques: an adult definition was given for the word, an antonym or synonym was given, and the meaning was acted out by the teacher or the picture detailing the meaning of the word in the book was highlighted. A single subject research design using pre-intervention, intervention and post intervention assessment probes for the target vocabulary items was employed to examine the effectiveness of the intervention in teaching the children the targeted vocabulary. Teacher interviews were also carried out to assess the appropriateness of the intervention in relation to the philosophy of the Kura Kaupapa and its pedagogical appropriateness and cultural responsiveness. The results suggested that the children in all three groups (SLI, RD and TD) made moderate gains in the acquisition of the target vocabulary supporting the hypothesis that targeting vocabulary in story book retelling at a whole class level will lead to acquisition of the vocabulary by the participants' exposed to the intervention. However, using a Two Standard Deviation method to evaluate the significance of each participant's change, the gains made for the RD and SLI participants were not significant. The TD participants did demonstrate a significant difference in the number of words correct. The teachers of the participants involved in the study reported positively on the effectiveness and appropriateness of the intervention for inclusion within the Kura Kaupapa and classroom programme. In particular, teachers' reported that as the intervention included each child in the class (as opposed to a withdrawal intervention model) the intervention was more appropriate for the philosophy of the Kura Kaupapa. The teachers' also reported the effectiveness of the intervention for the development of collaboration and relationship building between the teacher and researcher (a speech-language therapist. The data showed that the intervention investigated in this study was culturally responsive and pedagogically appropriate. It could be included as a component of the class programme as it was responsive to the philosophy of the Kura Kaupapa. The participants' did make moderate gains in the acquisition of the vocabulary (although not at a level to be considered significant for children with delayed development). Further research is necessary to explore the effectiveness of what may potentially be a useful intervention to enhance vocabulary development for children in Kura Kaupapa.
4

An Intervention Approach to Target Vocabulary Development in Te Reo Maori in Maori Immersion Settings

Gallagher, Kerrie Louise January 2008 (has links)
The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a storybook retell technique to facilitate vocabulary acquisition in children educated in Māori immersion class settings. A second aim of the study was to explore the cultural responsiveness and pedagogical appropriateness of the intervention approach and the importance of relationship building (whakawhanaungatanga) to successful interventions. Nine children participated in the study. These children (aged between 5 and 8 years) were recruited from two Kura Kaupapa Māori settings in differing urban areas in New Zealand. The children entered the study on a rolling basis in groups of three. The first three participants to enter the study were recruited from the one classroom on the basis of their demonstrating specific language impairment (SLI). The second group of three participants attended a different classroom and these participants were recruited into the study as a result of identified delayed reading development (RD). The third group of three participants from a third classroom was selected as the participants exhibited typical spoken and written language development (TD). The intervention technique utilized in this study adopted a structured approach to teaching the meaning of pre selected vocabulary items that were embedded in class story books. Three different books were selected and each book was read by the teacher to the whole class three times during a one week period. The target vocabulary was highlighted each time it occurred in the story through the following techniques: an adult definition was given for the word, an antonym or synonym was given, and the meaning was acted out by the teacher or the picture detailing the meaning of the word in the book was highlighted. A single subject research design using pre-intervention, intervention and post intervention assessment probes for the target vocabulary items was employed to examine the effectiveness of the intervention in teaching the children the targeted vocabulary. Teacher interviews were also carried out to assess the appropriateness of the intervention in relation to the philosophy of the Kura Kaupapa and its pedagogical appropriateness and cultural responsiveness. The results suggested that the children in all three groups (SLI, RD and TD) made moderate gains in the acquisition of the target vocabulary supporting the hypothesis that targeting vocabulary in story book retelling at a whole class level will lead to acquisition of the vocabulary by the participants' exposed to the intervention. However, using a Two Standard Deviation method to evaluate the significance of each participant's change, the gains made for the RD and SLI participants were not significant. The TD participants did demonstrate a significant difference in the number of words correct. The teachers of the participants involved in the study reported positively on the effectiveness and appropriateness of the intervention for inclusion within the Kura Kaupapa and classroom programme. In particular, teachers' reported that as the intervention included each child in the class (as opposed to a withdrawal intervention model) the intervention was more appropriate for the philosophy of the Kura Kaupapa. The teachers' also reported the effectiveness of the intervention for the development of collaboration and relationship building between the teacher and researcher (a speech-language therapist. The data showed that the intervention investigated in this study was culturally responsive and pedagogically appropriate. It could be included as a component of the class programme as it was responsive to the philosophy of the Kura Kaupapa. The participants' did make moderate gains in the acquisition of the vocabulary (although not at a level to be considered significant for children with delayed development). Further research is necessary to explore the effectiveness of what may potentially be a useful intervention to enhance vocabulary development for children in Kura Kaupapa.
5

The tensions facing a board of trustee model within the cultural framework of kura kaupapa Maaori : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts in Social Policy at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

Stokes, Kanewa January 2003 (has links)
This study originated from personal experience, as a member of a Board of Trustee (BOT) within Kura Kaupapa Maaori (KKM). The workload required for Kura compliance with government regulation and legislation, was phenomenal. The BOT model seemed to be structured on a corporate model of governance with accountability to the Ministry of Education. This contradicted with the needs of Kura whaanau to be involved in Kura decisionmaking. The BOT model unintentionally created a separation and tension between whaanau and BOT members. This research set out to explore the BOT model of governance within our Kura, from a cultural perspective, rather, than researching problems identified by ERa. The research undertook a review of the literature that placed the BOT model within the 1984 -1990 Economic Reforms. It highlighted the impact of past government policies, and administration, on the Maaori language and culture to illuminate the cultural, economic, political and social context of the establishment of Kura Kaupapa Maaori and the doctrine of Te Aho Matua (TAM). The BOT model, and KKM/TAM, are founded on differing values. The study was approached from a Kaupapa Maaori perspective; not wishing to reaffirm the negative stigma of past research undertaken of Maaori. The objectives of the study were to gain an understanding of whaanau cultural capacity, perceptions and understanding of KKM and TAM; and also, whaanau understanding of the BOT model. The research design consisted of a case study. This involved a questionnaire to all whaanau; and in-depth discussions with a sample of twelve whaanau. Appropriate ethical considerations were given to the process, which addressed both academic and cultural needs. Findings clearly identify the structure, and nature of the BOT model, being problematic within the cultural framework of a KKM underpinned by Te Aho Matua. The values and principles between the model and TAM fundamentally conflict. Findings also identify key factors, that both government and Kura whaanau can utilise, in advancing whaanau governance.
6

The tensions facing a board of trustee model within the cultural framework of kura kaupapa Maaori : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts in Social Policy at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

Stokes, Kanewa January 2003 (has links)
This study originated from personal experience, as a member of a Board of Trustee (BOT) within Kura Kaupapa Maaori (KKM). The workload required for Kura compliance with government regulation and legislation, was phenomenal. The BOT model seemed to be structured on a corporate model of governance with accountability to the Ministry of Education. This contradicted with the needs of Kura whaanau to be involved in Kura decisionmaking. The BOT model unintentionally created a separation and tension between whaanau and BOT members. This research set out to explore the BOT model of governance within our Kura, from a cultural perspective, rather, than researching problems identified by ERa. The research undertook a review of the literature that placed the BOT model within the 1984 -1990 Economic Reforms. It highlighted the impact of past government policies, and administration, on the Maaori language and culture to illuminate the cultural, economic, political and social context of the establishment of Kura Kaupapa Maaori and the doctrine of Te Aho Matua (TAM). The BOT model, and KKM/TAM, are founded on differing values. The study was approached from a Kaupapa Maaori perspective; not wishing to reaffirm the negative stigma of past research undertaken of Maaori. The objectives of the study were to gain an understanding of whaanau cultural capacity, perceptions and understanding of KKM and TAM; and also, whaanau understanding of the BOT model. The research design consisted of a case study. This involved a questionnaire to all whaanau; and in-depth discussions with a sample of twelve whaanau. Appropriate ethical considerations were given to the process, which addressed both academic and cultural needs. Findings clearly identify the structure, and nature of the BOT model, being problematic within the cultural framework of a KKM underpinned by Te Aho Matua. The values and principles between the model and TAM fundamentally conflict. Findings also identify key factors, that both government and Kura whaanau can utilise, in advancing whaanau governance.
7

The tensions facing a board of trustee model within the cultural framework of kura kaupapa Maaori : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts in Social Policy at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

Stokes, Kanewa January 2003 (has links)
This study originated from personal experience, as a member of a Board of Trustee (BOT) within Kura Kaupapa Maaori (KKM). The workload required for Kura compliance with government regulation and legislation, was phenomenal. The BOT model seemed to be structured on a corporate model of governance with accountability to the Ministry of Education. This contradicted with the needs of Kura whaanau to be involved in Kura decisionmaking. The BOT model unintentionally created a separation and tension between whaanau and BOT members. This research set out to explore the BOT model of governance within our Kura, from a cultural perspective, rather, than researching problems identified by ERa. The research undertook a review of the literature that placed the BOT model within the 1984 -1990 Economic Reforms. It highlighted the impact of past government policies, and administration, on the Maaori language and culture to illuminate the cultural, economic, political and social context of the establishment of Kura Kaupapa Maaori and the doctrine of Te Aho Matua (TAM). The BOT model, and KKM/TAM, are founded on differing values. The study was approached from a Kaupapa Maaori perspective; not wishing to reaffirm the negative stigma of past research undertaken of Maaori. The objectives of the study were to gain an understanding of whaanau cultural capacity, perceptions and understanding of KKM and TAM; and also, whaanau understanding of the BOT model. The research design consisted of a case study. This involved a questionnaire to all whaanau; and in-depth discussions with a sample of twelve whaanau. Appropriate ethical considerations were given to the process, which addressed both academic and cultural needs. Findings clearly identify the structure, and nature of the BOT model, being problematic within the cultural framework of a KKM underpinned by Te Aho Matua. The values and principles between the model and TAM fundamentally conflict. Findings also identify key factors, that both government and Kura whaanau can utilise, in advancing whaanau governance.
8

The tensions facing a board of trustee model within the cultural framework of kura kaupapa Maaori : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts in Social Policy at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

Stokes, Kanewa January 2003 (has links)
This study originated from personal experience, as a member of a Board of Trustee (BOT) within Kura Kaupapa Maaori (KKM). The workload required for Kura compliance with government regulation and legislation, was phenomenal. The BOT model seemed to be structured on a corporate model of governance with accountability to the Ministry of Education. This contradicted with the needs of Kura whaanau to be involved in Kura decisionmaking. The BOT model unintentionally created a separation and tension between whaanau and BOT members. This research set out to explore the BOT model of governance within our Kura, from a cultural perspective, rather, than researching problems identified by ERa. The research undertook a review of the literature that placed the BOT model within the 1984 -1990 Economic Reforms. It highlighted the impact of past government policies, and administration, on the Maaori language and culture to illuminate the cultural, economic, political and social context of the establishment of Kura Kaupapa Maaori and the doctrine of Te Aho Matua (TAM). The BOT model, and KKM/TAM, are founded on differing values. The study was approached from a Kaupapa Maaori perspective; not wishing to reaffirm the negative stigma of past research undertaken of Maaori. The objectives of the study were to gain an understanding of whaanau cultural capacity, perceptions and understanding of KKM and TAM; and also, whaanau understanding of the BOT model. The research design consisted of a case study. This involved a questionnaire to all whaanau; and in-depth discussions with a sample of twelve whaanau. Appropriate ethical considerations were given to the process, which addressed both academic and cultural needs. Findings clearly identify the structure, and nature of the BOT model, being problematic within the cultural framework of a KKM underpinned by Te Aho Matua. The values and principles between the model and TAM fundamentally conflict. Findings also identify key factors, that both government and Kura whaanau can utilise, in advancing whaanau governance.
9

The tensions facing a board of trustee model within the cultural framework of kura kaupapa Maaori : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts in Social Policy at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

Stokes, Kanewa January 2003 (has links)
This study originated from personal experience, as a member of a Board of Trustee (BOT) within Kura Kaupapa Maaori (KKM). The workload required for Kura compliance with government regulation and legislation, was phenomenal. The BOT model seemed to be structured on a corporate model of governance with accountability to the Ministry of Education. This contradicted with the needs of Kura whaanau to be involved in Kura decisionmaking. The BOT model unintentionally created a separation and tension between whaanau and BOT members. This research set out to explore the BOT model of governance within our Kura, from a cultural perspective, rather, than researching problems identified by ERa. The research undertook a review of the literature that placed the BOT model within the 1984 -1990 Economic Reforms. It highlighted the impact of past government policies, and administration, on the Maaori language and culture to illuminate the cultural, economic, political and social context of the establishment of Kura Kaupapa Maaori and the doctrine of Te Aho Matua (TAM). The BOT model, and KKM/TAM, are founded on differing values. The study was approached from a Kaupapa Maaori perspective; not wishing to reaffirm the negative stigma of past research undertaken of Maaori. The objectives of the study were to gain an understanding of whaanau cultural capacity, perceptions and understanding of KKM and TAM; and also, whaanau understanding of the BOT model. The research design consisted of a case study. This involved a questionnaire to all whaanau; and in-depth discussions with a sample of twelve whaanau. Appropriate ethical considerations were given to the process, which addressed both academic and cultural needs. Findings clearly identify the structure, and nature of the BOT model, being problematic within the cultural framework of a KKM underpinned by Te Aho Matua. The values and principles between the model and TAM fundamentally conflict. Findings also identify key factors, that both government and Kura whaanau can utilise, in advancing whaanau governance.
10

The tensions facing a board of trustee model within the cultural framework of kura kaupapa Maaori : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts in Social Policy at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

Stokes, Kanewa January 2003 (has links)
This study originated from personal experience, as a member of a Board of Trustee (BOT) within Kura Kaupapa Maaori (KKM). The workload required for Kura compliance with government regulation and legislation, was phenomenal. The BOT model seemed to be structured on a corporate model of governance with accountability to the Ministry of Education. This contradicted with the needs of Kura whaanau to be involved in Kura decisionmaking. The BOT model unintentionally created a separation and tension between whaanau and BOT members. This research set out to explore the BOT model of governance within our Kura, from a cultural perspective, rather, than researching problems identified by ERa. The research undertook a review of the literature that placed the BOT model within the 1984 -1990 Economic Reforms. It highlighted the impact of past government policies, and administration, on the Maaori language and culture to illuminate the cultural, economic, political and social context of the establishment of Kura Kaupapa Maaori and the doctrine of Te Aho Matua (TAM). The BOT model, and KKM/TAM, are founded on differing values. The study was approached from a Kaupapa Maaori perspective; not wishing to reaffirm the negative stigma of past research undertaken of Maaori. The objectives of the study were to gain an understanding of whaanau cultural capacity, perceptions and understanding of KKM and TAM; and also, whaanau understanding of the BOT model. The research design consisted of a case study. This involved a questionnaire to all whaanau; and in-depth discussions with a sample of twelve whaanau. Appropriate ethical considerations were given to the process, which addressed both academic and cultural needs. Findings clearly identify the structure, and nature of the BOT model, being problematic within the cultural framework of a KKM underpinned by Te Aho Matua. The values and principles between the model and TAM fundamentally conflict. Findings also identify key factors, that both government and Kura whaanau can utilise, in advancing whaanau governance.

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