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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Marine algal chemistry

Woolard, Frank January 1977 (has links)
Typescript. / Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1977. / Includes bibliographies. / I. Halogenated constituents of Chondrococcus hornemanni (Mertens) Schmitz.--II. Halogenated constituents of Asparagopsis taxiformis (Delile) trev.--III. Studies on the biogenesis of the dictyopterene hydrocarbons and sulfur compounds. / Microfiche.
2

A structural investigation of the sulphated polysaccharides of Aeodes orbitosa and Phyllymenia cornea

Parolis, Haralambos January 1968 (has links)
A highly sulphated, methylated polysaccharide, aeodan, isolated from the red seaweed Aeodes orbitosa was shown to contain galactose, 2-̲̲O-methyl-D-galactose, 4-O̲-methyl-Lgalactose, 6-O̲-methyl-D-galactose, xylose, and glycerol. The polysaccharide was desulphated with methanolic hydrogen chloride. Periodate oxidation of aeodan and desulphated aeodan, followed by reduction and hydrolysis, revealed the presence of 1,4- and 1,3-linked galactose residues and 1,3-linked 6-O̲-methy l-D-galactose residues in aeodan. Treatment of aeodan with sodium hydroxide revealed that the majority of the ester sulphate groups were alkali stable. Methylation of desulphated aeodan revealed that the polysaccharide was composed entirely of 1,3 and 1,4 links. Methylation of aeodan revealed the presence of 1,3- and 1,4- linked units, 1,3-linked galactose-2-sulphate, and 1,3-linked galactose-2, 6-disulphate units in the polysaccharide. Partial hydrolysis of aeodan resulted in the isolation and characterisation of 3-O̲-D-galactopyranosyl-D-galactose and 4-O̲-ß-D-galactopyranosyl- D-galactose. A sulphated, methylated polysaccharide, phyllymenan, isolated from the red seaweed Phyllymenia cornea was shown to contain galactose, 2-O̲-methyl-D-galactose, 4-O̲-methyl L- galactose , 6-O̲-methyl -D-galactose, and xylose. The polysaccharide was completely desulphated with methanolic hydrogen chloride. Periodate oxidation of phyllymenan before and after desulphation revealed that removal of the sulphate ester groups had not produced any new adjacent hydroxyl groups. Alkali treatment of phyllymenan revealed that the ester sulphate groups were alkali stable. Methylation studies on phyllymenan revealed the presence of 1,3- and 1,4-linked units, 1,3-linked galactose-2-sulphate, and 1,3-linked galactose- 2,6-disulphate units in the polysaccharide. Partial hydrolysis of phyllymenan revealed the presence or 4-O-̲ß- D-Dgalactopyranosyl- D-galactosc, 4-O-̲ß-D-galactopyranosyl -2-0- methyl-D-galactose, a galactosylgalactose composed of D and L-galactose, and adjacent 6-O̲-methyl- and 2-O̲-methyl-D- galactose units in the polysaccharide.
3

A structural investigation of the sulphated polysaccharide of Anathaca dentata (suhr) papenf. and the xylan of Chaetangium erinaceum (turn.) papenf.

Russell, Irina January 1972 (has links)
Hot-water extraction of Anatheca dentata, a red seaweed belonging to the family Solieriaceae, yielded a mixture of polysaccharides. Fractionation of this mixture with Cetavlon gave a glucomannan as minor component and a highly sulphated major component, which gave D- and L-galactose, D-xylose and small amounts of 3-0 (underscore)-methylgalactose, pyruvic acid and uronic acid on hydrolysis. All subsequent investigations were carried out on the sulphated major component. The sulphate was not labile to alkali, but was removed with methanolic hydrogen chloride. Periodate oxidation of the polysaccharide before and after desulphation indicated that new a-glycol groups were formed during desulphation. All the xylose units in the polymer were cleaved by periodate and this, together with the fact that the major xylose product from methylation analysis of the desulphated polymer was the 2,3, 4-tri-0 (underscore)-methyl derivative, indicated that the xylose occurs as a non-reducing end-group. Methylation of the desulphated polysaccharide revealed the presence of 1,4- and 1,3- linked D- galactose and 1,4- linked L-galactose units in the polymer. D-Glucuronic acid occurred as non-reducing end-groups. Summary, p. 1.
4

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) content of marine microalgae and bacteria with applications for measuring marine microbial growth rates and production

Jones, David Robert, 1954 January 1989 (has links)
Typescript. / Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1989. / Includes bibliographical references. / Microfiche. / xvii, 206 leaves, bound ill. 29 cm
5

Determination of arsenic in seaweed kelp tablets by hydride generation: inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP- AES)

January 2004 (has links)
No abstract available. / Thesis (M.Sc.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2004
6

Seasonal variations in the chemical composition of selected Hong Kong seaweeds.

January 1997 (has links)
by Chan Ching Ching Jenny. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1997. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 118-127). / Acknowledgments --- p.i / Abstract --- p.ii / List of figures --- p.iv / List of tables --- p.vii / List of abbreviations --- p.viii / Chapter Chapter 1. --- Introduction / Chapter 1.1 --- Consumption and classification of seaweeds --- p.1 / Chapter 1.2 --- Present uses of seaweeds --- p.4 / Chapter 1.2.1 --- The chemical composition of seaweeds --- p.4 / Chapter 1.2.2 --- Industrial uses - phycocolloids / Chapter 1.2.2.1 --- Alginate --- p.7 / Chapter 1.2.2.2 --- Carrageenan --- p.9 / Chapter 1.2.2.3 --- Agar --- p.12 / Chapter 1.3 --- Seasonal variations studies --- p.14 / Chapter 1.4 --- Seaweeds in Hong Kong --- p.16 / Chapter 1.5 --- Seaweeds selected for study / Chapter 1.5.1 --- Sargassum species / Chapter 1.5.1.1 --- Uses of Sargassum --- p.16 / Chapter 1.5.1.2 --- Seasonal variations of Sargassum --- p.17 / Chapter 1.5.2 --- Hypnea species --- p.19 / Chapter 1.6 --- Drying methods used in seaweed studies and industrial processing --- p.20 / Chapter 1.7 --- Significance of the present study --- p.22 / Chapter Chapter 2. --- Materials and methods / Chapter 2.1 --- "Location, seaweed collection, and environmental parameters" --- p.24 / Chapter 2.2 --- Sample preparation --- p.24 / Chapter 2.3 --- Chemical composition analysis / Chapter 2.3.1 --- Protein --- p.26 / Chapter 2.3.2 --- Amino acids --- p.28 / Chapter 2.3.3 --- Dietary fiber --- p.29 / Chapter 2.3.4 --- Sugar --- p.30 / Chapter 2.3.5 --- Ash --- p.31 / Chapter 2.3.6 --- Mineral elements --- p.32 / Chapter 2.3.7 --- Vitamin C --- p.32 / Chapter 2.3.8 --- Moisture --- p.33 / Chapter 2.4 --- Characterization of alginate from brown seaweed Sargassum hemiphyllum / Chapter 2.4.1 --- Alginate extraction --- p.33 / Chapter 2.4.2 --- Uronic acid block composition determination --- p.34 / Chapter 2.4.2.1 --- M/G ratio determination --- p.35 / Chapter 2.4.2.2 --- Phenol-sulfuric acid method for determination of sugar --- p.35 / Chapter 2.5 --- Characterization of carrageenan from red seaweed Hypnea charoides / Chapter 2.5.1 --- Carrageenan extraction --- p.35 / Chapter 2.5.2 --- Chemical analysis of carrageenan - sulfate content --- p.36 / Chapter 2.5.3 --- Physical analysis of carrageenan / Chapter 2.5.3.1 --- Gelling temperature --- p.37 / Chapter 2.5.3.2 --- Gelling concentration --- p.37 / Chapter 2.6 --- Data Analysis --- p.38 / Chapter Chapter 3. --- "Comparative studies on the effect of sun-drying, oven-drying, and freeze- drying methods on the chemical composition of brown seaweed Sargassum hemiphyllum" / Chapter 3.1 --- Results and discussion / Chapter 3.1.1 --- Color and appearance --- p.39 / Chapter 3.1.2 --- Chemical composition / Chapter 3.1.2.1 --- "Protein, dietary fiber, ash, and moisture" --- p.39 / Chapter 3.1.2.2 --- Amino acids --- p.42 / Chapter 3.1.2.3 --- Mineral elements --- p.44 / Chapter 3.1.2.4 --- Vitamin C --- p.46 / Chapter 3.1.3 --- Characterization of alginate / Chapter 3.1.3.1 --- Extraction of alginate --- p.46 / Chapter 3.1.3.2 --- Uronic acid block composition and M/G ratio --- p.48 / Chapter 3.2 --- Summary --- p.50 / Chapter Chapter 4. --- Seasonal variations in the chemical composition of brown seaweed Sargassum hemiphyllum / Chapter 4.1 --- Results and discussion / Chapter 4.1.1 --- Environmental parameters --- p.53 / Chapter 4.1.2 --- Morphology --- p.58 / Chapter 4.1.3 --- Chemical composition / Chapter 4.1.3.1 --- Protein and amino acids --- p.60 / Chapter 4.1.3.2 --- Dietary fiber and polysaccharide sugars --- p.64 / Chapter 4.1.3.3 --- Ash and mineral elements --- p.69 / Chapter 4.1.3.4 --- Vitamin C --- p.76 / Chapter 4.1.3.5 --- Water and moisture --- p.78 / Chapter 4.1.4 --- Characterization of phycocolloid - alginate / Chapter 4.1.4.1 --- Alginate extraction --- p.78 / Chapter 4.1.4.2 --- Uronic acid block composition and M/G ratio --- p.79 / Chapter Chapter 5. --- Seasonal variations in the chemical composition of red seaweed Hypnea charoides / Chapter 5.1 --- Results and discussion / Chapter 5.1.1 --- Environmental parameters --- p.82 / Chapter 5.1.2 --- Color and appearance --- p.86 / Chapter 5.1.3 --- Chemical composition / Chapter 5.1.3.1 --- Protein and amino acids --- p.88 / Chapter 5.1.3.2 --- Dietary fiber and polysaccharide sugars --- p.93 / Chapter 5.1.3.3 --- Ash and mineral elements --- p.97 / Chapter 5.1.3.4 --- Vitamin C --- p.104 / Chapter 5.1.3.5 --- Water and moisture --- p.104 / Chapter 5.1.4 --- Characterization of phycocolloid - carrageenan / Chapter 5.1.4.1 --- Carrageenan extraction --- p.106 / Chapter 5.1.4.2 --- Chemical characteristic of carrageenan - sulfate content --- p.109 / Chapter 5.1.4.3 --- Physical characteristics of carrageenan / Chapter 5.1.4.3.1 --- Gelling temperature --- p.110 / Chapter 5.1.4.3.2 --- Gelling concentration --- p.110 / Chapter Chapter 6. --- Conclusion --- p.113 / Chapter 6.1 --- Development perspectives of seaweeds --- p.116 / Chapter Chapter 7. --- References --- p.118 / Chapter Chapter 8. --- Appendixes --- p.128

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