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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Characterization of secretogranin III in mast cells

Prasad, Prerna January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2006. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 84-91). / ix, 91 leaves, bound ill. 29 cm
2

Immunological effects of cytokines and anti-allergic traditional Chinese medicine on human (HMC-1) mast cells.

January 2005 (has links)
by Tsang Chi Man. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2005. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 137-155). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / Acknowledgements --- p.i / Abbreviations --- p.iii / Abstract --- p.vi / 撮要 --- p.ix / Publications --- p.xi / Table of contents --- p.xii / Chapter Chapter 1 --- Introduction --- p.1 / Chapter 1.1 --- Human mast cells and their pathological roles in inflammation --- p.1 / Chapter 1.1.1 --- Morphology of mast cells --- p.1 / Chapter 1.1.2 --- Mediators of mast cells --- p.1 / Chapter 1.1.3 --- Migration and activation --- p.3 / Chapter 1.1.4 --- Pathological roles of mast cells --- p.3 / Chapter 1.1.5 --- Human mast cell-1 (HMC-1) --- p.5 / Chapter 1.2 --- Cytokines as stimulator of mast cells in inflammation --- p.7 / Chapter 1.2.1 --- SCF --- p.7 / Chapter 1.2.2 --- TNF-α --- p.8 / Chapter 1.2.3 --- IL-13 --- p.8 / Chapter 1.2.4 --- IL-18 --- p.9 / Chapter 1.2.5 --- IL-25 --- p.9 / Chapter 1.3 --- Interaction of mast cells with inflammatory cells through adhesion molecules and chemokines --- p.11 / Chapter 1.3.1 --- Adhesion molecules on mast cells --- p.11 / Chapter 1.3.2 --- Chemokines released by mast cells --- p.12 / Chapter 1.4 --- Intracellular signaling pathways in mast cells --- p.16 / Chapter 1.4.1 --- p38-MAPK pathway --- p.16 / Chapter 1.4.2 --- ERK pathway --- p.17 / Chapter 1.4.3 --- NF-kB Pathway --- p.18 / Chapter 1.4.3 --- Cross-talking of pathways --- p.18 / Chapter 1.5 --- Signal transduction pathways and pharmacological intervention --- p.23 / Chapter 1.6 --- Traditional Chinese Medicine and pharmacological intervention --- p.25 / Chapter 1.6.1 --- Anti-allergic effects of traditional Chinese Medicine --- p.25 / Chapter 1.6.2 --- Anti-asthmatic effects of a newly developed Wheeze-Relief Formula --- p.26 / Chapter 1.7 --- Aims and scope of the study --- p.30 / Chapter Chapter 2 --- Materials and Methods / Chapter 2.1 --- Materials --- p.32 / Chapter 2.1.1 --- HMC-1 cell Line --- p.32 / Chapter 2.1.2 --- Media and reagents for cell culture --- p.32 / Chapter 2.1.3 --- Recombinant human cytokines --- p.33 / Chapter 2.1.4 --- "Signal transduction pathway inhibitors: PD98035, SB203580 and BAY 117082" --- p.34 / Chapter 2.1.5 --- Monoclonal antibodies and reagents for immunofluorescent staining --- p.34 / Chapter 2.1.6 --- Reagents and buffers for chemokine detection --- p.35 / Chapter 2.1.7 --- Reagents and buffers for total RNA extraction --- p.36 / Chapter 2.1.8 --- Reagents and buffers for reverse transcription 一 polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) --- p.37 / Chapter 2.1.9 --- Reagents and buffers for protein extraction --- p.40 / Chapter 2.1.10 --- Reagents and buffers for detection of activated signaling pathways --- p.41 / Chapter 2.1.11 --- Reagents and buffers for agarose gel electrophoresis --- p.42 / Chapter 2.1.12 --- Reagents and buffers for SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) --- p.43 / Chapter 2.1.13 --- Reagents and buffers for Western blot analysis --- p.45 / Chapter 2.1.14 --- Reagents and buffers for cDNA expression array analysis --- p.47 / Chapter 2.1.15 --- Reagents and buffers for cell viability and proliferation assay --- p.48 / Chapter 2.1.16 --- Reagent kit for endotoxin level assay --- p.49 / Chapter 2.2 --- Methods --- p.49 / Chapter 2.2.1 --- HMC-1 cell cultures --- p.49 / Chapter 2.2.2 --- Flow cytometry of cell surface expression of ICAM-1 and ICAM-3 --- p.50 / Chapter 2.2.3 --- Total cellular RNA extraction --- p.50 / Chapter 2.2.4 --- Reverse Transcription - Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) --- p.51 / Chapter 2.2.5 --- Agarose gel electrophoresis --- p.51 / Chapter 2.2.6 --- "Quantitative analysis of IL-8, IP-10,MCP-1 and RANTES" --- p.52 / Chapter 2.2.7 --- Quantitative analysis of 1-309 and MIP-1β --- p.52 / Chapter 2.2.8 --- Detection of phosphorylated-ERX and phosphorylated-p38 MAPK --- p.53 / Chapter 2.2.9 --- Detection of NF-kB activity --- p.53 / Chapter 2.2.10 --- Detection of phosphorylated-ATF-2 --- p.53 / Chapter 2.2.11 --- Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) --- p.54 / Chapter 2.2.12 --- Western blot analysis --- p.54 / Chapter 2.2.13 --- MTT assay --- p.55 / Chapter 2.2.14 --- Cell proliferation assay --- p.55 / Chapter 2.2.15 --- Hot water extraction of TCM --- p.56 / Chapter 2.2.16 --- Endotoxin level assay --- p.56 / Chapter 2.2.17 --- cDNA expression array analysis --- p.57 / Chapter 2.2.18 --- Statistical analysis --- p.57 / Chapter Chapter 3 --- Results / Chapter 3.1 --- The effects of cytokines on the expression of ICAM-1 and ICAM-3 on HMC-1 --- p.59 / Chapter 3.1.1. --- "SCF, TNF-α and IL-13 up-regulated ICAM-1 but not ICAM-3 expression on HMC-1 cells" --- p.59 / Chapter 3.1.2. --- "SCF, TNF-α and IL-13 up-regulated the mRNA expression of ICAM-1" --- p.59 / Chapter 3.1.3 --- "The combined treatment of SCF and TNF-α, and SCF and IL-13 showed synergistic and additive effect on ICAM-1 expression respectively" --- p.60 / Chapter 3.1.4 --- Synergistic up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression in combined treatment of SCF and TNF-α was dose-dependently enhanced by SCF --- p.60 / Chapter 3.2 --- "The effects of cytokines on the release of IL-8, IP-10, MCP-1, RANTES, 1-309 and MIP-1β from HMC-1 cells" --- p.66 / Chapter 3.2.1 --- "SCF induced the release of IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES, 1-309 and MIP-1β" --- p.66 / Chapter 3.2.2 --- "TNF-a induced the release of IL-8, IP-10, MCP-1, RANTES and 1-309" --- p.66 / Chapter 3.2.3 --- SCF and TNF-α did not enhance the proliferation rate of HMC-1 --- p.66 / Chapter 3.3 --- "The effect of SCF and TNF-α on the activation of ERK, p38 MAPK and NK-kB" --- p.71 / Chapter 3.3.1 --- SCF activated ERK but not p38 MAPK and NF-kB --- p.71 / Chapter 3.3.2 --- TNF-α activated p38 MAPK and NF-kB but not ERK --- p.71 / Chapter 3.4 --- The effect of inhibitors on the SCF and TNF-a-induced release of chemokines --- p.76 / Chapter 3.4.1 --- "The optimal dose of PD98059, SB203580 and BAY117082" --- p.76 / Chapter 3.4.2 --- "PD98059 suppressed the SCF induced IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES, 1-309 and MIP-1β release from HMC-1 cells" --- p.76 / Chapter 3.4.3 --- SB203580 and BAY117082 differentially suppressed the TNF-α induced chemokine release from HMC-1 cells --- p.77 / Chapter 3.5 --- The effect of inhibitors on the SCF and TNF-a-induced upregulation of ICAM-1 --- p.83 / Chapter 3.5.1 --- BAY117082 but not SB203580 suppressed the TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression --- p.83 / Chapter 3.5.2 --- PD98059 and BAY 117082 suppressed the combined treatment of SCF and TNF-α induced ICAM-1 expression --- p.83 / Chapter 3.6 --- "Effect of inhibitors on TNF-α and SCF-induced ERK, p38 MAPK and NF-kB activities in HMC-1 cells." --- p.85 / Chapter 3.6.1 --- PD98059 suppressed the SCF-induced activity of ERK --- p.85 / Chapter 3.6.2 --- SB203580 and BAY117082 suppressed the TNF-α induced p38 MAPKand NF-kB activity respectively --- p.85 / Chapter 3.6.3 --- PD98059 suppressed the enhanced NF-kB activity after the combined treatment of SCF and TNF-α for 18 hours --- p.86 / Chapter 3.7 --- Effect of TNF-α and SCF on the gene expression profile of inflammatory cytokines and receptors of HMC-1 cells. --- p.90 / Chapter 3.8 --- The effects of TCM on the SCF-induced 1-309 and MCP-1 from HMC-1 cells --- p.95 / Chapter 3.8.1 --- "Endotoxin level of Radix astragali, Radix Scutellariae, Radix stemonae, Bulbus Fritillariae cirrhosae and Cordyceps sinensis" --- p.95 / Chapter 3.8.2 --- The effects of TCM on the proliferation rate of HMC-1 cells --- p.95 / Chapter 3.9.3 --- The effects of TCM on the SCF-induced release of 1-309 from HMC-1 cells --- p.96 / Chapter Chapter 4 --- Discussion / Chapter 4.1 --- Involvement of adhesion molecules and chemokines in mast cell-mediated immunological events --- p.107 / Chapter 4.2 --- HMC-1 as the in vitro mast cell model adapted in my project --- p.108 / Chapter 4.3 --- The effect of cytokines on the expression of ICAM-1 and ICAM-3 in HMC-1 cells --- p.109 / Chapter 4.4 --- The effect of cytokines on the release of chemokines in HMC-1 cells --- p.111 / Chapter 4.5 --- "The regulation of ICAM-1, IL-8, IP-10, MCP-1, RANTES, 1-309 and MIP-1β through p-38 MAPK, ERK and NF-kB signaling pathways in HMC-1 cells" --- p.115 / Chapter 4.6 --- Further characterization of HMC-1 cells using cDNA array --- p.119 / Chapter 4.7 --- Investigating the in vitro anti-allergic activities of a newly developed Wheeze-relief formula using cytokine-activated HMC-1 cells --- p.128 / Chapter 4.8 --- Concluding remarks and future prospective --- p.132 / References --- p.137 / Appendix --- p.156
3

Intracellular signaling mechanisms regulating the mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation.

January 2007 (has links)
Ng Sin Man. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2007. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 120-135). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / Acknowledgements --- p.i / Abbreviations --- p.iii / Abstract --- p.vi / 撮要 --- p.ix / Publications --- p.xi / Table of contents --- p.xiii / Chapter Chapter 1 --- General Introduction / Chapter 1.1 --- Allergic Diseases and Allergic Inflammation --- p.1 / Chapter 1.1.1 --- Prevalence of Allergic Diseases --- p.1 / Chapter 1.1.2 --- Common Allergic Diseases: Allergic Asthma --- p.1 / Chapter 1.1.3 --- Common Allergic Diseases: Atopic Dermatitis --- p.2 / Chapter 1.1.4 --- Allergic Inflammation --- p.3 / Chapter 1.2 --- The Inflammatory Leukocytes: Mast Cells and Eosinophils --- p.6 / Chapter 1.2.1 --- Characteristics of Mast Cells --- p.6 / Chapter 1.2.2 --- Mast Cells Distribution --- p.8 / Chapter 1.2.3 --- Mast Cells Subtypes --- p.8 / Chapter 1.2.4 --- HMC-1 Cells --- p.9 / Chapter 1.2.5 --- Characteristics of Eosinophils --- p.12 / Chapter 1.3 --- Adhesion Molecules in Allergic Diseases --- p.15 / Chapter 1.3.1 --- Adhesion Molecules and Leukocyte Migration --- p.15 / Chapter 1.3.2 --- Selectin --- p.17 / Chapter 1.3.3 --- Intermolecular Adhesion Molecules --- p.17 / Chapter 1.3.4 --- Integrin --- p.18 / Chapter 1.4 --- Cytokines and Chemokines in Allergic Diseases --- p.18 / Chapter 1.4.1 --- IL-6 --- p.20 / Chapter 1.4.2 --- CXCL1 --- p.21 / Chapter 1.4.3 --- CXCL8 --- p.21 / Chapter 1.4.3 --- CCL2 --- p.22 / Chapter 1.5 --- Intercellular Signal Transduction Pathways in Inflammation --- p.24 / Chapter 1.5.1 --- RAS-RAF-mitogen-activated Protein Kinases --- p.24 / Chapter 1.5.2 --- Janus Kinase/ Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcriptions Pathway --- p.27 / Chapter 1.5.3 --- Nuclear Factor-KB Pathway --- p.29 / Chapter 1.5.4 --- Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Pathway --- p.31 / Chapter 1.6 --- Aims and Scope of the Study --- p.33 / Chapter Chapter 2 --- Materials and Methods / Chapter 2.1 --- Materials --- p.35 / Chapter 2.1.1 --- HMC-1 Cell Line --- p.35 / Chapter 2.1.2 --- Human Buffer Coat --- p.35 / Chapter 2.1.3 --- Human Mast Cell Chymase and TLR ligands --- p.35 / Chapter 2.1.4 --- Media and Reagents for Cell Culture --- p.36 / Chapter 2.1.5 --- Reagents and Buffers for Purification of Human Eosinophils --- p.37 / Chapter 2.1.6 --- Reagents and Buffers for Flow Cytmetry --- p.38 / Chapter 2.1.7 --- Reagents and Buffers for Total RNA Extraction --- p.41 / Chapter 2.1.8 --- Reagents and Buffers for Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) --- p.42 / Chapter 2.1.9 --- Reagents and Buffers for Agarose Gel Electrophoresis --- p.45 / Chapter 2.1.10 --- Reagents and Buffers for Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate -polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) --- p.46 / Chapter 2.1.11 --- Reagents and Buffers for Western Blot Analysis --- p.48 / Chapter 2.1.12 --- Chemotactic Migration --- p.51 / Chapter 2.1.13 --- Signaling Transduction Inhibitors and Protein Synthesis Inhibitors --- p.51 / Chapter 2.2 --- Methods --- p.52 / Chapter 2.2.1 --- HMC-1 Cell Cultures --- p.52 / Chapter 2.2.2 --- Purification of Buffy Coat Eosinophils by MACS and Eosinophil Culture --- p.52 / Chapter 2.2.3 --- Total Cellular RNA Extraction --- p.53 / Chapter 2.2.4 --- RT-PCR --- p.54 / Chapter 2.2.5 --- Agarose Gel Electrophoresis --- p.55 / Chapter 2.2.6 --- Flow Cytometry Analysis --- p.55 / Chapter 2.2.7 --- Protein Array Analysis of Cytokine Release --- p.57 / Chapter 2.2.8 --- Quantitative Analysis ofCXCLl --- p.58 / Chapter 2.2.9 --- Total Protein Extraction --- p.58 / Chapter 2.2.10 --- SDS-PAGE --- p.58 / Chapter 2.2.11 --- Western Blot Analysis --- p.59 / Chapter 2.2.12 --- Chemotactic Migration Analysis --- p.60 / Chapter 2.2.13 --- Statistical Analysis --- p.60 / Chapter Chapter 3 --- Effects of Mast Cell Derived Chymase on Human Eosinophils and the Signaling Mechanisms: Implication in Allergic Inflammation / Chapter 3.1 --- Introduction --- p.61 / Chapter 3.2 --- Results --- p.65 / Chapter 3.2.1 --- Effects of Chymase on Eosinophil Survival --- p.65 / Chapter 3.2.2 --- Effects of Chymase on the Adhesion Molecule Expression of Eosinophils --- p.68 / Chapter 3.2.3 --- Effects of Chymase on the Chemokinetic Properties on Eosinophils --- p.71 / Chapter 3.2.4 --- Effects of Chymase on the Release of Chemokines and IL-6 from Eosinophils --- p.73 / Chapter 3.2.5 --- Signal Transduction Mechanism Involved in Regulating Chymase-induced Effects on Eosinophils --- p.78 / Chapter 3.3 --- Discussion --- p.71 / Chapter Chapter 4 --- TLR-mediated Effects and Signal Transduction Mechanism of HMC-1 Cells / Chapter 4.1 --- Introduction --- p.92 / Chapter 4.2 --- Results --- p.97 / Chapter 4.2.1 --- Expression of Adhesion Molecules on HMC-1 Cells --- p.95 / Chapter 4.2.2 --- TLR Expression Profile on HMC-1 Cells --- p.97 / Chapter 4.2.3 --- Effects of TLR ligands on HMC-1 Cell Adhesion Molecule Expressions --- p.99 / Chapter 4.2.4 --- TLR7-induced Phosphorylation of ERK and Effects of PD98059 on TLR7-induced ERK Phosphorylation --- p.104 / Chapter 4.2.5 --- Effect of TLR7 Ligand on HMC-1 Cells Cytokine Release --- p.108 / Chapter 4.3 --- Discussion --- p.110 / Chapter Chapter 5 --- Conclusions and Future Perspectives / Chapter 5.1 --- Conclusions --- p.115 / Chapter 5.2 --- Future Perspectives --- p.117 / References --- p.120 / Appendix --- p.136
4

Mast cells mediate systemic immunosuppression induced by platelet-activating factor via histamine and cyclooxygenase-2 dependent mechanisms

Ocaña, Jesus Alejandro 02 May 2016 (has links)
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) / Platelet-activating Factor (PAF) stimulates various cell types by the activation of the G-protein coupled PAF-receptor (PAFR). Systemic PAFR activation induces an acute pro-inflammatory response, as well as delayed systemic immunosuppressive effects in vivo. De novo enzymatic PAF synthesis and degradation are closely regulated, but oxidative stressors, such as UVB, and cigarette smoke, can generate PAF-like species via the oxidation of membrane lipids in an unregulated process. Mast cells (MCs) and the PAFR have been shown to be necessary to mediate the resulting systemic immune suppression from oxidative stressors. The work herein implicates pro-oxidative chemotherapeutics, such as melphalan and etoposide, in mediating augmentation in tumor growth by inducing the generation of PAFR agonists via the oxidation of membrane lipids. This work also demonstrates the role of MCs and MC-released mediators in PAFR systemic immunosuppression. Through a contact hypersensitivity (CHS) model, the MC PAFR was found to be necessary and sufficient for PAF to mediate systemic immunosuppression. Additionally, activation of the MC PAFR seems to induce MC histamine and prostaglandin E2 release. Furthermore, by transplanting histamine- or COX-2-deficient MCs into MC-deficient mice, MC-derived histamine and prostaglandin release were found to be necessary for PAF to induce systemic immunosuppression. Lastly, we have evidence to suggest that prostaglandin release modulates MC migration to draining lymph nodes, a process necessary to promote immunosuppression. These studies fit with the hypothesis that MC PAFR activation mediates PAFR systemic immunosuppression in part by histamine and prostaglandin release.
5

Polipose nasal: caracterização da infiltração dos eosinófilos, mastócitos, miofibroblastos e células TGF-beta positivas em indivíduos com e sem asma / Nasal polyposis: characterization of eosinophils, mast cells, myofibroblasts and TGF-ß-positive cells in individuals with and without asthma

Nakanishi, Marcio 20 May 2005 (has links)
Para identificar, quantificar e correlacionar os eosinófilos, mastócitos, miofibroblastos e células TGF-beta positivas nos pólipos nasais de pacientes com e sem asma foi realizado a imunoistoquímica. A quantidade de eosinófilos, miofibroblastos e células TGF-beta positivas esteve aumentada no pólipo nasal de indivíduos asmáticos. O número de mastócitos não mostrou diferença entre os grupos. O miofibroblasto foi o denominador comum na correlação entre eosinófilos, mastócitos, células TGF-beta positivas e presença de asma / Introduction: Nasal polyposis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the nasal mucosa or paranasal sinuses characterized by the formation of benign polyps. The pathogenesis is not known, although nasal polyps are associated with several systemic diseases, with asthma being the most frequent. The aim of the present study was to identify, quantify, compare and correlate eosinophils, mast cells, myofibroblasts and TGF-ß-positive cells in nasal polyps of patients with and without asthma. Material and Methods: Seventy-eight subjects with nasal polyps undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery were selected. Control specimens were obtained from eight subjects with a normal sinus mucosa. One group consisted of polyps from 56 patients with asthma and the other of polyps from 22 patients without asthma. Immunohistochemistry was performed using monoclonal antibodies against eosinophil cationic protein to stain eosinophils, against tryptase to stain mast cells, against alpha-smooth muscle actin to stain myofibroblasts, and against TGF-ß to stain TGF-ß-positive cells. Results: The number of eosinophils, myofibroblasts and TGF-ß-positive cells was significantly higher in the asthma group than in the nonasthma group, whereas no significant difference in the number of mast cells was observed between the two groups. The number of eosinophils, mast cells, myofibroblasts and TGF-ß-positive cells was significantly higher in nasal polyps than in the control group. Myofibroblasts showed a significant correlation with eosinophils, mast cells, TGF-ß-positive cells, and asthma. Conclusion: Eosinophils, mast cells, myofibroblasts and TGF-ß-positive cells were identified in all nasal polyps, although the number of eosinophils, myofibroblasts and TGF-ß-positive cells was higher in the asthma group. The number of mast cells was similar regardless of the presence or absence of asthma. Myofibroblasts were a common denominator in the correlation between eosinophils, mast cells, TGF-ß-positive cells, and asthma
6

Polipose nasal: caracterização da infiltração dos eosinófilos, mastócitos, miofibroblastos e células TGF-beta positivas em indivíduos com e sem asma / Nasal polyposis: characterization of eosinophils, mast cells, myofibroblasts and TGF-ß-positive cells in individuals with and without asthma

Marcio Nakanishi 20 May 2005 (has links)
Para identificar, quantificar e correlacionar os eosinófilos, mastócitos, miofibroblastos e células TGF-beta positivas nos pólipos nasais de pacientes com e sem asma foi realizado a imunoistoquímica. A quantidade de eosinófilos, miofibroblastos e células TGF-beta positivas esteve aumentada no pólipo nasal de indivíduos asmáticos. O número de mastócitos não mostrou diferença entre os grupos. O miofibroblasto foi o denominador comum na correlação entre eosinófilos, mastócitos, células TGF-beta positivas e presença de asma / Introduction: Nasal polyposis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the nasal mucosa or paranasal sinuses characterized by the formation of benign polyps. The pathogenesis is not known, although nasal polyps are associated with several systemic diseases, with asthma being the most frequent. The aim of the present study was to identify, quantify, compare and correlate eosinophils, mast cells, myofibroblasts and TGF-ß-positive cells in nasal polyps of patients with and without asthma. Material and Methods: Seventy-eight subjects with nasal polyps undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery were selected. Control specimens were obtained from eight subjects with a normal sinus mucosa. One group consisted of polyps from 56 patients with asthma and the other of polyps from 22 patients without asthma. Immunohistochemistry was performed using monoclonal antibodies against eosinophil cationic protein to stain eosinophils, against tryptase to stain mast cells, against alpha-smooth muscle actin to stain myofibroblasts, and against TGF-ß to stain TGF-ß-positive cells. Results: The number of eosinophils, myofibroblasts and TGF-ß-positive cells was significantly higher in the asthma group than in the nonasthma group, whereas no significant difference in the number of mast cells was observed between the two groups. The number of eosinophils, mast cells, myofibroblasts and TGF-ß-positive cells was significantly higher in nasal polyps than in the control group. Myofibroblasts showed a significant correlation with eosinophils, mast cells, TGF-ß-positive cells, and asthma. Conclusion: Eosinophils, mast cells, myofibroblasts and TGF-ß-positive cells were identified in all nasal polyps, although the number of eosinophils, myofibroblasts and TGF-ß-positive cells was higher in the asthma group. The number of mast cells was similar regardless of the presence or absence of asthma. Myofibroblasts were a common denominator in the correlation between eosinophils, mast cells, TGF-ß-positive cells, and asthma

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