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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
21

Assessing moral sensitivity in business personnel

Hunter, Richard A. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Georgia State University, 1997. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Bibliography: leaves 88-94.
22

Agents, patients, and moral discourse

Hajdin, Mane January 1987 (has links)
No description available.
23

Predictors discriminating morality from legality :: moral responsibility's bottom line.

Shanahan, Kathleen M. 01 January 1994 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
24

The effect of similarity in parents' moral stage on children's moral development.

Lam, Mabel Sau-ching 01 January 1991 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
25

从"隐性-显性"角度理解儿童正义概念的发展. / Understanding the development of children's concept of justice from the implicit-explicit dimension / 从隐性显性角度理解儿童正义概念的发展 / CUHK electronic theses & dissertations collection / Cong "yin xing-xian xing" jiao du li jie er tong zheng yi gai nian de fa zhan. / Cong yin xing xian xing jiao du li jie er tong zheng yi gai nian de fa zhan

January 2010 (has links)
In Study One, hypothetical scenarios of distribution tasks were used to investigate the development of children's concept of distributive justice. Forty-two 5, 7 and 9-year-old children were asked to firstly complete the distribution tasks in seven scenarios during which distribution behavior and verbal explanation were recorded. They were then invited to complete the judgment task by imagining themselves as a judge who had to evaluate the appropriateness of a child's distributions in the seven scenarios. After malting their judgment, the children received a feedback on the appropriate distributions in the seven scenarios which was presented in picture form as the decisions of a large group of judges. Subsequent to reading this series of pictures in their own pace, the children completed another set of distribution tasks in seven similar scenarios. As predicted, children's performance on distribution behavior (level-I) was significantly higher than their performance on verbal explanation (level-E2/3), indicating a difference between the implicit and explicit representation of children's concept of justice. Children's performance on the judgment task (level-E1) was significantly higher than their performance on verbal explanation (level-E2/3), showing a difference between the representations of level-E1 and level-E2/3. However, participants' performance on the judgment task (level-E1) was significantly higher than their performance on the distribution behavior (level-I). Analysis on the subconcepts of distributive justice revealed that there was no significant difference between children' performance on the judgment task and the distribution behavior regarding the concepts of "equality", "equity", "need" and "mixed sense of justice". Only in the case of the concept of "distribution based on empathy", the performance on judgment was significantly higher than that of distribution behavior. / In Study Two, a real-life group distribution activity was designed to investigate the development of children's concepts of procedural and distributive justice, as well as the role of empathy in the process and outcome of the distribution. Ten groups of 5-, 7- and 9-yeat-old children (four in a group, two boys and two girls) were asked to distribute four kinds of gifts including a piece of cake, a set of 12 crayons, 4 pieces of chocolate and 4 cartoon pins. In the condition without empathetic arousal, the groups freely discussed how to distribute the four kinds of gifts and then distributed among themselves. After distributing all the gifts, the children were asked to respond to a series of questions individually and collectively, through which chances for them to make verbal explanations on the concepts of procedural and distributive justice were provided. Aweek later, the groups received a feedback on just procedures and then completed a similar group distribution task. In the empathetic arousal condition, a volunteer in the group was invited to report a recent event that made him or her sad. After listening to the story, the group of four children continued the group distribution task. Unlike the condition without empathetic arousal, no further feedback was provided, nor was there a second round distribution task. / Investigating the development of children's concept of justice from the implicit-explicit dimension, the present study introduced a new theoretical and methodological perspective into the concerned topic area. With such a new perspective, rich forms of implicit representations of children's concept of justice were found, and refined analyses of the developmental patterns of children's subconcepts of justice were made possible. Taking consideration of the effects of the feedback on the development of children's concept of justice, this study throws light on the practice of moral education in which children may acquire implicit understanding without educators' explicit verbal explanation. There were drawbacks in the design of the judgment task (for exploring the level-E1 in Study One) and in the manipulation of empathetic arousal, which call for an improvement in further research. Developmental studies on the concept of justice could extend their age group below five and beyond nine, with a view to exploring the earlier representation of the implicit level on one hand, and the more mature representation of the explicit level on the other. (Abstract shortened by UMI.) / The present study investigated the development of children's concept of distributive and procedural justice from the implicit-explicit dimension on the basis of Karmiloff-Smith's Representational Redescription model (1992). The role of empathy in the development of children's concept of justice was also examined. / 徐华女. / Adviser: Wan-chi Wong. / Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 73-03, Section: B, page: . / Thesis (Ph.D.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2010. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 301-314). / Electronic reproduction. Hong Kong : Chinese University of Hong Kong, [2012] System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader. Available via World Wide Web. / Electronic reproduction. [Ann Arbor, MI] : ProQuest Information and Learning, [201-] System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader. Available via World Wide Web. / Abstracts in Chinese and English. / Xu Huanü.
26

Juveniles and their moral reasoning /

Lee, Kwok-chuen. January 2001 (has links)
Thesis (M. Soc. Sc.)--University of Hong Kong, 2001. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 59-60).
27

Parent materialistic values: Effects on domain parenting and adolescent moral development

Johnston, Megan Elizabeth 10 January 2014 (has links)
Materialism, or the orientation towards viewing material goods and money as important for personal happiness, is detrimental in several ways: it is associated with psychological maladjustment and lowered well-being and also conflicts with pursuits of caring for and relating to others. Although research has found that materialism is associated with fewer and lower-quality relationships with others, no research to date has explored the effects of materialism on the parent-child relationship, and the resulting impact on the child’s orientation towards others. These associations were explored in the present research. One hundred and five mothers and 76 fathers were assessed on measures of materialism (self-enhancement values and extrinsic aspirations) and parenting. Three domains of parenting were considered: control parenting (disciplinary strategies), protection parenting (responsiveness to child distress), and guided learning parenting (guidance through parent-child discussion). The 105 adolescents of these parents were assessed on indicators of moral development: prosocial and antisocial behavior, value internalization, prosocial moral reasoning, and empathy. It was hypothesized that parent materialism would predict lower levels of adolescent moral development and that this association would be mediated by parenting behaviors. This hypothesis was partially supported, but only for mothers. One measure of mother materialism - self-enhancement - related to adolescent prosocial behavior, while the other measure of mother materialism - extrinsic aspirations - related to adolescent approval orientation. Two mediators were identified for the mother self-enhancement/adolescent prosocial behavior link: mother operational-interfering style during moral discussions (guided learning parenting) and mother use of non-reasoning and punitive disciplinary strategies (control parenting). Beyond these links to adolescent moral development, both mother and father materialism were linked to negative parenting behaviors, including low responsiveness to adolescent distress, low empathy (in mothers), and high use of scolding and criticisms (in fathers). The results of this research indicate that when parents place high value on demonstrating power over others and achievement according to social standards at the expense of more prosocial values, adolescent moral development suffers, as mediated by the effect of materialism on parenting behaviors.
28

Parent materialistic values: Effects on domain parenting and adolescent moral development

Johnston, Megan Elizabeth 10 January 2014 (has links)
Materialism, or the orientation towards viewing material goods and money as important for personal happiness, is detrimental in several ways: it is associated with psychological maladjustment and lowered well-being and also conflicts with pursuits of caring for and relating to others. Although research has found that materialism is associated with fewer and lower-quality relationships with others, no research to date has explored the effects of materialism on the parent-child relationship, and the resulting impact on the child’s orientation towards others. These associations were explored in the present research. One hundred and five mothers and 76 fathers were assessed on measures of materialism (self-enhancement values and extrinsic aspirations) and parenting. Three domains of parenting were considered: control parenting (disciplinary strategies), protection parenting (responsiveness to child distress), and guided learning parenting (guidance through parent-child discussion). The 105 adolescents of these parents were assessed on indicators of moral development: prosocial and antisocial behavior, value internalization, prosocial moral reasoning, and empathy. It was hypothesized that parent materialism would predict lower levels of adolescent moral development and that this association would be mediated by parenting behaviors. This hypothesis was partially supported, but only for mothers. One measure of mother materialism - self-enhancement - related to adolescent prosocial behavior, while the other measure of mother materialism - extrinsic aspirations - related to adolescent approval orientation. Two mediators were identified for the mother self-enhancement/adolescent prosocial behavior link: mother operational-interfering style during moral discussions (guided learning parenting) and mother use of non-reasoning and punitive disciplinary strategies (control parenting). Beyond these links to adolescent moral development, both mother and father materialism were linked to negative parenting behaviors, including low responsiveness to adolescent distress, low empathy (in mothers), and high use of scolding and criticisms (in fathers). The results of this research indicate that when parents place high value on demonstrating power over others and achievement according to social standards at the expense of more prosocial values, adolescent moral development suffers, as mediated by the effect of materialism on parenting behaviors.
29

Moral attitudes and school achievement /

Correll, Thomas Michael. January 1979 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (B.Sc.(Hons.)) -- University of Adelaide, Dept. of Psychology, 1980.
30

Implicit and explicit retrieval of target words from schema-eliciting solution statements by moral judgment experts and novices /

Williams, Wendy Ellyce. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D., Education)--University of Idaho, December 2006. / Major professor: Thomas N. Fairchild. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 107-130). Also available online (PDF file) by subscription or by purchasing the individual file.

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