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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A case study of narcissistic pathology : an object relations perspective

Ivey, Gavin William January 1989 (has links)
The case-study method of psychological research was applied to the brief psychodynamic therapy of a narcissistically disordered female patient. The aim of this research was to explore, clarify and explain certain diagnostic and psychodynamic anomalies to emerge in the course of treatment, using a conceptual framework derived from select psychoanalytic object relations theorists in the area of narcissistic pathology. The author, discovering that there was no diagnostic or explanatory object relations model adequate to the therapeutic data, formulated his own diagnostic category narcissistic neurosis and an eclectic object relations model in order to explain the anomolous research findings. Narcissistic neurosis was defined as a form of psychopathology in which a primarily neurotic character structure presents with a distinctly narcissistic profile. The narcissistic false self-structure serves the functional purpose of protecting the psyche from a repressed negative self-representation derived from a destructive bipolar self-object introject. The primary etiological factor to emerge was that of a narcissistic mother conditional affection and self-object target child necessitated adaptive whose insensitivity, relationship with the premature self-sufficiency and the defensive emergence of a narcissistic surface self-representation. It was proposed that narcissistic neurosis and narcissistic personality disorder are two discrete forms of pathology differing in terms of severity, psychodynamics, defensive structure, mode of object relating, therapeutic accessibility and prognosis. Assessment criteria were proposed in order to differentiate the two areas of narcissistic pathology and assess suitability for psychotherapeutic treatment. Positive treatment results in this case-study suggest that narcissistic neuroses may receive long-term benefit from short-term psychodynamic therapy.
2

Investigating Narcissism and Escalation in Aggression

Takenouchi, Minako January 2007 (has links)
Research has linked narcissism to a tendency for becoming aggressive based on the perspective that narcissistic people are more prone to ego-threats and more prone to responding defensively to those ego-threats. Also, recent research has been examining the propensity for aggression to escalate as a means to justify prior aggression. This study examined the relationship between narcissism and escalation in aggression and possible mediators of increased aggression. If highly narcissistic individuals are more vulnerable to ego-threats and in turn justify their actions more, then their aggression might escalate more. To examine this, sixty-seven subjects who completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory prior to the laboratory session were assigned to two groups using a bug-extermination method (though no bugs were actually killed) developed by Martens and his colleagues (in press). They either killed one or five bugs initially and then conducted a subsequent bug-killing task in which they controlled the number of bugs they killed. As predicted, participants who killed five bugs initially killed more bugs during the subsequent bug-extermination task than those who killed only one bug initially. Contrary to predictions, no effects of or interactions of narcissism with the initial bug-killing manipulation emerged. We did find, however, that a subtype of narcissism, that is superiority, affected the self-paced 20 seconds bug-killing behaviour. The limitations, further directions, and implications of this study are discussed.
3

Investigating Narcissism and Escalation in Aggression

Takenouchi, Minako January 2007 (has links)
Research has linked narcissism to a tendency for becoming aggressive based on the perspective that narcissistic people are more prone to ego-threats and more prone to responding defensively to those ego-threats. Also, recent research has been examining the propensity for aggression to escalate as a means to justify prior aggression. This study examined the relationship between narcissism and escalation in aggression and possible mediators of increased aggression. If highly narcissistic individuals are more vulnerable to ego-threats and in turn justify their actions more, then their aggression might escalate more. To examine this, sixty-seven subjects who completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory prior to the laboratory session were assigned to two groups using a bug-extermination method (though no bugs were actually killed) developed by Martens and his colleagues (in press). They either killed one or five bugs initially and then conducted a subsequent bug-killing task in which they controlled the number of bugs they killed. As predicted, participants who killed five bugs initially killed more bugs during the subsequent bug-extermination task than those who killed only one bug initially. Contrary to predictions, no effects of or interactions of narcissism with the initial bug-killing manipulation emerged. We did find, however, that a subtype of narcissism, that is superiority, affected the self-paced 20 seconds bug-killing behaviour. The limitations, further directions, and implications of this study are discussed.
4

Investigating narcissism and escalation in aggression : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirement[s] for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology [at the University of Canterbury] /

Takenouchi, Minako. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Canterbury, 2007. / Typescript (photocopy). Includes bibliographical references (leaves 50-59). Also available via the World Wide Web.
5

Narcissistic personality and academic underachievement in school age children

Mah, Terry January 1988 (has links)
The achievement (as indexed by standardized test scores) of 56 (54 females and 2 males) private school children was studied in relation to demographic (social status and gender), behavioral (three indicators of persistence), dispositional (clinical and psychometric measures of narcissism), and ability (Otis-Lennon) factors. A clinical procedure and device were developed to augment the information yielded by those procedures whose purpose was primarily the generation of quantitative data. The qualitative and quantitative material was studied together to explore Freud's distinction between libidinal types, which might be implicated in differences in cultural (e.g., school) achievement. Results are discussed in relation to research, assessment, and educational issues. / Arts, Faculty of / Psychology, Department of / Graduate
6

Narcissism and its discontents

Walsh, Julie January 2012 (has links)
No description available.
7

Narcissism and its measurement: A conditional reasoning measure for narcissism

Schnure, Katherine Anne 27 August 2014 (has links)
Narcissism, which is broadly defined as a grandiose sense of self-importance (Judge, LePine, & Rich, 2006), is a construct that is associated with many potentially toxic traits and behaviors (Back, Schmukle, & Egloff, 2010; Hogan, Raskin, & Fazzini, 1990; Paulhus & Williams, 2002). Recently, interest in determining the effects of narcissism in organizations has increased (e.g. Blair, Hoffman, & Helland, 2008; Chatterjee & Hambrick, 2007; Judge et al., 2006; Penney & Spector, 2002). Psychometric issues with the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI; Raskin & Hall 1979, 1981) and other measures of narcissism necessitate a more robust measure that can more accurately capture the facets of a complex construct. Conditional Reasoning Tests are designed to indirectly measure implicit cognitive processes (James & LeBreton, 2011), and are especially useful in measuring "socially unacceptable" traits such as narcissism. A 20-item Conditional Reasoning Test for Narcissism (CRT-NR) was created and underwent preliminary validation testing. Results support a 15-item measure to be used in continued validation of the instrument.
8

Who is the most envious of them all? examining how 3 narcissistic subtypes relate to dispositional and episodic envy

Neufeld, Darren C. 10 December 2012 (has links)
Both clinical theory (Kernberg, 1974a) and diagnostic nomenclature (DSM-IV-TR; APA, 2000) describe narcissists as envious, although what little evidence exists suggests this relationship may be weak or nonexistent (Gold, 1996). To examine this discrepancy, 204 young adult students completed dispositional measures of narcissism (grandiose [adaptive, pathological] and vulnerable), entitlement, and envy. Later, students competed against ostensibly advantaged opponents in a betting simulation, completed self-report measures of relative deprivation and envy, and could spend some of their earnings to burn their opponents' earnings (assessing possible behavioural effects of envy). Structural equation models were evaluated for each episodic envy variant (self-reported, behavioral, indirect). Only the self-reported envy model demonstrated adequate fit and variance explained. Vulnerable narcissism strongly predicted envy via a "trait" route entailing susceptibility to chronic envy and a "triggered" route implicating frustrated entitlements, whereas adaptive narcissism predicted envy via the "triggered" route only. Possible theoretical and clinical implications are discussed.
9

Who is the most envious of them all? examining how 3 narcissistic subtypes relate to dispositional and episodic envy

Neufeld, Darren C. 10 December 2012 (has links)
Both clinical theory (Kernberg, 1974a) and diagnostic nomenclature (DSM-IV-TR; APA, 2000) describe narcissists as envious, although what little evidence exists suggests this relationship may be weak or nonexistent (Gold, 1996). To examine this discrepancy, 204 young adult students completed dispositional measures of narcissism (grandiose [adaptive, pathological] and vulnerable), entitlement, and envy. Later, students competed against ostensibly advantaged opponents in a betting simulation, completed self-report measures of relative deprivation and envy, and could spend some of their earnings to burn their opponents' earnings (assessing possible behavioural effects of envy). Structural equation models were evaluated for each episodic envy variant (self-reported, behavioral, indirect). Only the self-reported envy model demonstrated adequate fit and variance explained. Vulnerable narcissism strongly predicted envy via a "trait" route entailing susceptibility to chronic envy and a "triggered" route implicating frustrated entitlements, whereas adaptive narcissism predicted envy via the "triggered" route only. Possible theoretical and clinical implications are discussed.
10

Understanding and Exploring Narcissism: Impact on Students and College Campuses

Hudson, Emily J. 01 January 2012 (has links)
"Narcissist" is a term that may be used lightly to describe or label someone that is self-centered. However, research that suggests a possible increase in narcissistic personality tendencies among college-aged American students has a very real and serious impact on society. The goal of this paper is to examine the evolution of the concept of narcissism and its detrimental effects on society. This will then be applied to the impact that narcissism has on college students and campus environments. It is important to note that individuals high in narcissistic traits encounter many problems including difficulties with interpersonal and professional relationships, and poor insight and self-awareness. Moreover, students high in narcissism are in danger of academic failure, especially in certain prestigious collegiate environments that are more likely to foster narcissistic tendencies.

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