• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 9
  • 1
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 11
  • 11
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Factors related to teacher mobility in schools of the Northwest Territories and arctic Quebec, 1971-72

Koenig, Delores Mary 08 January 2007
This study was designed to identify factors related to the mobility of teachers in the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec, and to explore the relationships among dissatisfaction factors, demographic characteristics of teachers, and mobility. <p>To obtain the data, the Teacher Mobility Questionnaire was constructed and mailed to northern teachers and to some teachers who had left the north in the past two years. The questionnaire consisted of items suggested by the literature on teacher mobility and its causes, as well as items considered appropriate from the author's previous experience in northern Canada. <p>The study sample consisted of 32 former northern teachers and 238 teachers employed in schools of the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec at the time of the study. Totals represented a 36 per cent return of completed, acceptable questionnaires. <p> The major areas of study were: a description of northern teachers on the basis of demographic characteristics; an examination of the relationships among demographic variables and mobility; identification of factors related to teacher dissatisfaction; exploration of the relationships among dissatisfaction factors and mobility; and the suggestion of the existence of "unique" northern mobility factors. Statistical procedures used to test hypotheses included correlation coefficients techniques; one-way analyses of variance; and Newman-Keuls comparisons between ordered means. <p>It was found that in comparison to teachers of the four western provinces, those in the Northwest Territories were more likely to be: younger, males, married, originally from Saskatchewan or Ontario; holders of degrees (elementary teachers); at higher salary levels, and more mobile. <p>Over 10 years, the general character of the northern teaching staff showed a trend towards a higher proportion of older, married men with longer training, and employed at higher salaries. The two variables which showed no appreciable change were the length of pre- northern experience, and length of tenure in northern teaching. Both fluctuated between a median of one and two years between 1960 and 1970. Median years of northern experience of teachers in the study was 2.1 years. <p>It was found that the only demographic variables significantly related to mobility were: age, salary, position, and location of school. Although such characteristics as sex, marital status, and previous experience showed some degree of relationship to mobility, they failed to be significant factors. <p>Items from the questionnaire were classified into six dissatisfaction factors. The factors and mean dissatisfaction score for each were: Personal and Economic, 3.001; Working Conditions, 3.200; Recruitment and Orientation, 3.142; Organizational Relationships, 3.159; Adminis tration, 3.284; Achievement, 3.612. Total mean dissatisfaction score was 3.295. Responses were on a five-point scale from (1) dissatisfaction, (2) to satisfaction. Means indicated that respondents in the study expressed more satisfaction than dissatisfaction with those factors investigated. <p>Analysis of the relationship of dissatisfaction to demographic characteristics and mobility found that: females were more dissatisfied than males; younger teachers with fewer years in the north were more dissatisfied than slightly older teachers; primary teachers were more dissatisfied than principals, vice-principals and high school teachers; low salaried teachers were more dissatisfied than higher salaried teachers. <p> In general, the non-mobiles appeared to be less dissatisfied than those who had left the north or intended to do so at the end of the year. It was obvious, however, from the low level of significance found in the analyses performed that dissatisfaction factors as used in this study were not the major reason for teacher mobility in the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec. The study was able to suggest such "unique" northern mobility factors as: lack of access to universities; the feeling of impermanence inherent in the northern living situation; isolation from social and cultural life of the south; intentions of being itinerant; difficulties of relating to culturally different pupils and community members. <p>This study indicated a need for further examination of northern teacher mobility with a focus on those factors unique to the northern teaching and living situation.
2

Factors related to teacher mobility in schools of the Northwest Territories and arctic Quebec, 1971-72

Koenig, Delores Mary 08 January 2007 (has links)
This study was designed to identify factors related to the mobility of teachers in the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec, and to explore the relationships among dissatisfaction factors, demographic characteristics of teachers, and mobility. <p>To obtain the data, the Teacher Mobility Questionnaire was constructed and mailed to northern teachers and to some teachers who had left the north in the past two years. The questionnaire consisted of items suggested by the literature on teacher mobility and its causes, as well as items considered appropriate from the author's previous experience in northern Canada. <p>The study sample consisted of 32 former northern teachers and 238 teachers employed in schools of the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec at the time of the study. Totals represented a 36 per cent return of completed, acceptable questionnaires. <p> The major areas of study were: a description of northern teachers on the basis of demographic characteristics; an examination of the relationships among demographic variables and mobility; identification of factors related to teacher dissatisfaction; exploration of the relationships among dissatisfaction factors and mobility; and the suggestion of the existence of "unique" northern mobility factors. Statistical procedures used to test hypotheses included correlation coefficients techniques; one-way analyses of variance; and Newman-Keuls comparisons between ordered means. <p>It was found that in comparison to teachers of the four western provinces, those in the Northwest Territories were more likely to be: younger, males, married, originally from Saskatchewan or Ontario; holders of degrees (elementary teachers); at higher salary levels, and more mobile. <p>Over 10 years, the general character of the northern teaching staff showed a trend towards a higher proportion of older, married men with longer training, and employed at higher salaries. The two variables which showed no appreciable change were the length of pre- northern experience, and length of tenure in northern teaching. Both fluctuated between a median of one and two years between 1960 and 1970. Median years of northern experience of teachers in the study was 2.1 years. <p>It was found that the only demographic variables significantly related to mobility were: age, salary, position, and location of school. Although such characteristics as sex, marital status, and previous experience showed some degree of relationship to mobility, they failed to be significant factors. <p>Items from the questionnaire were classified into six dissatisfaction factors. The factors and mean dissatisfaction score for each were: Personal and Economic, 3.001; Working Conditions, 3.200; Recruitment and Orientation, 3.142; Organizational Relationships, 3.159; Adminis tration, 3.284; Achievement, 3.612. Total mean dissatisfaction score was 3.295. Responses were on a five-point scale from (1) dissatisfaction, (2) to satisfaction. Means indicated that respondents in the study expressed more satisfaction than dissatisfaction with those factors investigated. <p>Analysis of the relationship of dissatisfaction to demographic characteristics and mobility found that: females were more dissatisfied than males; younger teachers with fewer years in the north were more dissatisfied than slightly older teachers; primary teachers were more dissatisfied than principals, vice-principals and high school teachers; low salaried teachers were more dissatisfied than higher salaried teachers. <p> In general, the non-mobiles appeared to be less dissatisfied than those who had left the north or intended to do so at the end of the year. It was obvious, however, from the low level of significance found in the analyses performed that dissatisfaction factors as used in this study were not the major reason for teacher mobility in the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec. The study was able to suggest such "unique" northern mobility factors as: lack of access to universities; the feeling of impermanence inherent in the northern living situation; isolation from social and cultural life of the south; intentions of being itinerant; difficulties of relating to culturally different pupils and community members. <p>This study indicated a need for further examination of northern teacher mobility with a focus on those factors unique to the northern teaching and living situation.
3

Factors related to teacher mobility in schools of the Northwest Territories and arctic Quebec, 1971-72

1972 December 1900 (has links)
This study was designed to identify factors related to the mobility of teachers in the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec, and to explore the relationships among dissatisfaction factors, demographic characteristics of teachers, and mobility. To obtain the data, the Teacher Mobility Questionnaire was constructed and mailed to northern teachers and to some teachers who had left the north in the past two years. The questionnaire consisted of items suggested by the literature on teacher mobility and its causes, as well as items considered appropriate from the author's previous experience in northern Canada. The study sample consisted of 32 former northern teachers and 238 teachers employed in schools of the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec at the time of the study. Totals represented a 36 per cent return of completed, acceptable questionnaires. The major areas of study were: a description of northern teachers on the basis of demographic characteristics; an examination of the relationships among demographic variables and mobility; identification of factors related to teacher dissatisfaction; exploration of the relationships among dissatisfaction factors and mobility; and the suggestion of the existence of "unique" northern mobility factors. Statistical procedures used to test hypotheses included correlation coefficients techniques; one-way analyses of variance; and Newman-Keuls comparisons between ordered means. It was found that in comparison to teachers of the four western provinces, those in the Northwest Territories were more likely to be: younger, males, married, originally from Saskatchewan or Ontario; holders of degrees (elementary teachers); at higher salary levels, and more mobile. Over 10 years, the general character of the northern teaching staff showed a trend towards a higher proportion of older, married men with longer training, and employed at higher salaries. The two variables which showed no appreciable change were the length of pre- northern experience, and length of tenure in northern teaching. Both fluctuated between a median of one and two years between 1960 and 1970. Median years of northern experience of teachers in the study was 2.1 years. It was found that the only demographic variables significantly related to mobility were: age, salary, position, and location of school. Although such characteristics as sex, marital status, and previous experience showed some degree of relationship to mobility, they failed to be significant factors. Items from the questionnaire were classified into six dissatisfaction factors. The factors and mean dissatisfaction score for each were: Personal and Economic, 3.001; Working Conditions, 3.200; Recruitment and Orientation, 3.142; Organizational Relationships, 3.159; Adminis tration, 3.284; Achievement, 3.612. Total mean dissatisfaction score was 3.295. Responses were on a five-point scale from (1) dissatisfaction, (2) to satisfaction. Means indicated that respondents in the study expressed more satisfaction than dissatisfaction with those factors investigated. Analysis of the relationship of dissatisfaction to demographic characteristics and mobility found that: females were more dissatisfied than males; younger teachers with fewer years in the north were more dissatisfied than slightly older teachers; primary teachers were more dissatisfied than principals, vice-principals and high school teachers; low salaried teachers were more dissatisfied than higher salaried teachers. In general, the non-mobiles appeared to be less dissatisfied than those who had left the north or intended to do so at the end of the year. It was obvious, however, from the low level of significance found in the analyses performed that dissatisfaction factors as used in this study were not the major reason for teacher mobility in the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec. The study was able to suggest such "unique" northern mobility factors as: lack of access to universities; the feeling of impermanence inherent in the northern living situation; isolation from social and cultural life of the south; intentions of being itinerant; difficulties of relating to culturally different pupils and community members. This study indicated a need for further examination of northern teacher mobility with a focus on those factors unique to the northern teaching and living situation.
4

Building Collaboration, Building Community: A Home for Northern Learning

Bender, Emilee 21 January 2007 (has links)
Building Collaboration, Building Community: A Home for Northern Learning explores the potential for architecture to support learning endeavors in the Canadian North. Informed by traditional approaches to northern learning for cultural continuity, alongside the assimilative effects of the residential school experience, the thesis strives to develop an environment for contemporary northern learning where both Aboriginal cultures and values can thrive alongside current educational endeavors. Situated within a context plagued by imposed and unsuccessful architectural models, the thesis advocates for a design process rooted in collaborative ideals. At its core, the thesis asserts that both the local knowledge of the community and the training of the architect are vital components in the design process. In the development of an environment for northern learning, both the socio-cultural visions of a northern people and the skill sets of the architect are of necessity. Local stories and perspectives - both past and present - guide project developments. As directed by the community, the scope of work does not focus solely upon the formal learning environment, but rather upon a series of social and cultural structures designed to support learners within the northern educational context. Technically, as informed by traditional architectural predecessors, the contemporary forms are developed in accordance with the local climate: the proposed architecture invites its inhabitants to thrive within the immediate northern landscape. Ultimately, these explorations – of community vision and technical design - are synthesized into a series of design vignettes for a student living community in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. The ideas housed within the architectural translations and the broader thesis documentations are not finite conclusions but rather they form the foundation for future investigations: they provide a starting point for continued dialogues and developments.
5

Building Collaboration, Building Community: A Home for Northern Learning

Bender, Emilee 21 January 2007 (has links)
Building Collaboration, Building Community: A Home for Northern Learning explores the potential for architecture to support learning endeavors in the Canadian North. Informed by traditional approaches to northern learning for cultural continuity, alongside the assimilative effects of the residential school experience, the thesis strives to develop an environment for contemporary northern learning where both Aboriginal cultures and values can thrive alongside current educational endeavors. Situated within a context plagued by imposed and unsuccessful architectural models, the thesis advocates for a design process rooted in collaborative ideals. At its core, the thesis asserts that both the local knowledge of the community and the training of the architect are vital components in the design process. In the development of an environment for northern learning, both the socio-cultural visions of a northern people and the skill sets of the architect are of necessity. Local stories and perspectives - both past and present - guide project developments. As directed by the community, the scope of work does not focus solely upon the formal learning environment, but rather upon a series of social and cultural structures designed to support learners within the northern educational context. Technically, as informed by traditional architectural predecessors, the contemporary forms are developed in accordance with the local climate: the proposed architecture invites its inhabitants to thrive within the immediate northern landscape. Ultimately, these explorations – of community vision and technical design - are synthesized into a series of design vignettes for a student living community in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. The ideas housed within the architectural translations and the broader thesis documentations are not finite conclusions but rather they form the foundation for future investigations: they provide a starting point for continued dialogues and developments.
6

Indicators for Prenatal Support and Neonatal Outcomes in Northern Canada

Denning, Bryany Beth Ingleton 29 September 2009 (has links)
Background: The current practice in northern Canada is to transfer pregnant women residing in communities without hospital facilities to larger centres at 37 weeks gestation. Little research has been conducted on how the practice of transferring women for childbirth affects available prenatal care continuity and prenatal care options, and whether or not this in turn affects health outcomes. Objectives: The aim of this study is to examine whether differences exist in prenatal care, risk factor distribution, and neonatal morbidity, between women who are transferred for childbirth, and women who are able to remain in their home community to give birth. Methods: Secondary analysis of the Canadian Maternity Experiences Survey 2006-2007 data was conducted in order to examine the relationship between transfer for childbirth, prenatal care, maternal risk factors, and neonatal morbidity. Crude odds ratios and adjusted odds ratios were calculated to assess the relationships between variables using multiple logistic regression, with bootstrap weights applied. Results: Women who were transferred for childbirth were more likely to experience a negative neonatal morbidity outcome (OR=1.9, 95% CIs 1.3-2.8), though this relationship disappeared when the relationship was adjusted for potential confounders. When these results were adjusted for potential confounding, smoking during pregnancy was the only risk factor shown to be significantly associated with neonatal morbidity in this study (OR=1.8, 95% CIs 1.0-3.0). Conclusion: More detailed and widespread data collection is needed to be able to properly assess prenatal care, maternal risk factors and neonatal morbidity in northern Canada. A perinatal database, constructed for surveillance purposes, would assist in further exploring the effect of transfer policy on prenatal care practices and maternal risk factor distribution, and the effect this has on neonatal health outcomes. / Thesis (Master, Community Health & Epidemiology) -- Queen's University, 2009-09-29 14:55:33.977
7

The Utilization of Vegetative Structure in the Interpretation and Differentiation of Certain Canadian Boreal Regions

Webb, Norman 05 1900 (has links)
The Development, presentation, and application of technique for interpreting examples of so-called muskeg terrain in Northern Canada. The emphasis is with a view to utilitarian aspects, not necessarily botanical implications, though the medium for the work is vegetal coverage. Illustrated with photographs. / Thesis / Bachelor of Arts (BA)
8

Improved Glacial Isostatic Adjustment Models for Northern Canada

Simon, Karen 23 December 2014 (has links)
In northern Canada, the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) response of the Earth to the former Pleistocene Laurentide and Innuitian ice sheets contributes significantly to the Earth's past and ongoing sea-level change and land deformation. In this dissertation, measurements of Holocene sea-level change and observations of GPS-measured vertical crustal uplift rates are employed as constraints in numerical GIA models that examine the thickness and volume history of the former ice sheets in northern North America. The study is divided into two main sections; the first provides new measurements of Holocene sea-level change collected west of Hudson Bay, while the second presents a GIA modelling analysis for the entire study area of northern Canada. Radiocarbon dating of post-glacial deposits collected in an area just west of central Hudson Bay provides several new constraints on regional Holocene sea-level change. The field collection area is near a former load centre of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS), and the sea-level measurements suggest that following deglaciation, regional sea level fell rapidly from a high-stand of nearly 170 m elevation just after 8000 cal yr BP to 60 m elevation by 5200 cal yr BP. Sea level subsequently fell at a decreased rate (approximately 30 m since 3000 cal yr BP). The fit of GIA model predictions to relative sea-level (RSL) data and present-day GPS-measured vertical land motion rates from throughout the study area constrains the peak thickness of the LIS to be 3.4-3.6 km west of Hudson Bay, and up to 4 km east of Hudson Bay. The ice model thicknesses inferred for these two regions represent, respectively, a 30% decrease and an average 20-25% increase to the load thickness relative to the ICE-5G reconstruction (Peltier 2004), generally consistent with other studies focussing on space geodetic measurements of vertical crustal motion. Around Baffin Island, the fit of GIA model predictions to RSL data indicate peak regional ice thicknesses of 1.2-1.3 km, a modest reduction compared to ICE-5G. A new reconstruction of the Innuitian Ice Sheet (IIS), which covered the Queen Elizabeth Islands at LGM, incorporates the current glacial-geological constraints on its spatial extent and timing history. The new IIS reconstruction provides RSL predictions that are more consistent with regional observations of post-glacial sea-level change than ICE-5G. The results suggest that the peak thickness of the IIS was 1600 m, approximately 400 m thicker than the minimum peak thickness indicated by glacial geology studies, but between 1000-1500 m thinner than the peak thicknesses used in previous regional ice sheet reconstructions. On Baffin Island and in the Queen Elizabeth Islands, however, the modelled elastic crustal response of the Earth to present-day ice mass changes is large. Accounting for this effect improves the agreement between GPS measurements of vertical crustal motion and the GIA model predictions. However, improvements such as the inclusion of spatially non-uniform mass loss and a sensitivity analysis that examines uncertainties of this effect should be incorporated into the modelling of present-day changes to glaciers and ice caps. / Graduate
9

Epidemiology of anthrax outbreaks in wood bison (Bison bison athabascae) of the Mackenzie bison population

2014 December 1900 (has links)
Wood bison (Bison bison athabascae) conservation in Northern Canada is negatively affected by diseases that kill these animals, such as anthrax caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis. Although this disease is considered ancient and was identified more than 2000 years ago in Egypt, little is still known about this disease in wild bison, such as why adult males are often predominantly affected and if the reason there are mortalities in some years and not in others is due to environmental, pathogen, or host factors. The overall objective of this thesis was to use descriptive and serological epidemiology to provide evidence needed to enhance our understanding of anthrax in wild wood bison. The first chapter explored the 2012 anthrax outbreak in bison of the Mackenzie bison population using descriptive epidemiology. Field crews discovered 451 bison carcasses during the outbreak. The carcasses were found between late June and early August, and it was estimated that the epidemic peaked between July 13-19 based on the date carcasses were found and the estimated length of time the animal had been deceased. A unique feature of this outbreak compared with the two previous outbreaks in the same population, as well as outbreaks in other wild wood bison herds, is that numerous calves, yearlings and adult females died rather than mostly adult males. Three separate geographic regions were identified by a field wildlife veterinarian, and examined for differences in outbreak characteristics. One region had proportionally more male carcasses than the others, and one had more calf deaths. Lack of complete data made it difficult to ascertain if the outbreak truly started in one of these regions before the others, or if it began simultaneously in all three. The second component of this project used serological epidemiology of anthrax in the Mackenzie bison population to gain an understanding of wood bison exposure to the bacterium. Serological samples were collected through various sources between 1986 and 2009, and later tested for anti-PA antibodies. Of the 278 samples tested, 191 (69%) were positive, indicating previous exposure to B. anthracis. Of the samples with a recorded gender, approximately 18.2% of those from females and 35.5% from males tested positive. The dataset spanned only one anthrax outbreak year in this population of animals, and the year with the highest proportion of positive samples was the year following this known epidemic (1994, 90% positive submissions). Adults had a higher prevalence of being seropositive than any of the other age categories, for both sexes. This research has revealed that in some outbreak years, all age classes and both genders of bison are affected by anthrax unlike in most outbreaks where predominantly adult males succumb to disease. Furthermore, bison are likely exposed to B. anthracis in non-outbreak years, indicating that they either experience subclinical disease or recover from clinical disease.
10

Northern exposures; photographic and filmic representations of the Canadian North, 1920-1945.

Geller, Peter G. (Peter Geoffrey), Carleton University. Dissertation. History. January 1995 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Carleton University, 1995. / Also available in electronic format on the Internet.

Page generated in 0.0415 seconds