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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The research of teacher mobility in a legal school for migrant children : a case study in Shanghai

Li, Yixin, 李怡欣 January 2014 (has links)
This study investigated teacher mobility situations in a case study school and the underlying factors influencing mobility intentions. Data was collected and analyzed using a mix-model approach, incorporating both qualitative and quantitative methods. The research participants were primary in-service teachers at the case study school, but not include teachers on loan from public schools and reemployed after retirement. To explain how different factors impact teachers’ mobility intentions, the data was interpreted and categorized using Alderfer’s ERG theory, which contends that human beings have the need for existence, relatedness, and growth. The results of this study are:(1) Working in the public schools is optimal occupational choice for most teachers because of its overwhelming advantages, such as better salaries and work benefits, job security, and better professional development opportunities, which can satisfy teachers’ needs for existence, relatedness and growth all at one and to a high degree. (2) Teachers’ mobility intention is the result of comparison between the present job and the potential jobs provided by other schools and other industries based on their different degrees of demand. (3) Many of the factors that influence teachers’ mobility intentions are under the school’s control, which enable schools to take an active role in stabilizing teachers’ mobility intentions. (4) Teachers’ mobility behavior is determined not only by mobility intention but also by mobility competence. Hence, it is better for school to make appropriate decisions and actions within school’s capacity to teachers’ mobility behaviors based on fully understanding their needs, their mobility intentions and their mobility competence. / published_or_final_version / Education / Master / Master of Education
2

Factors related to teacher mobility in schools of the Northwest Territories and arctic Quebec, 1971-72

Koenig, Delores Mary 08 January 2007
This study was designed to identify factors related to the mobility of teachers in the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec, and to explore the relationships among dissatisfaction factors, demographic characteristics of teachers, and mobility. <p>To obtain the data, the Teacher Mobility Questionnaire was constructed and mailed to northern teachers and to some teachers who had left the north in the past two years. The questionnaire consisted of items suggested by the literature on teacher mobility and its causes, as well as items considered appropriate from the author's previous experience in northern Canada. <p>The study sample consisted of 32 former northern teachers and 238 teachers employed in schools of the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec at the time of the study. Totals represented a 36 per cent return of completed, acceptable questionnaires. <p> The major areas of study were: a description of northern teachers on the basis of demographic characteristics; an examination of the relationships among demographic variables and mobility; identification of factors related to teacher dissatisfaction; exploration of the relationships among dissatisfaction factors and mobility; and the suggestion of the existence of "unique" northern mobility factors. Statistical procedures used to test hypotheses included correlation coefficients techniques; one-way analyses of variance; and Newman-Keuls comparisons between ordered means. <p>It was found that in comparison to teachers of the four western provinces, those in the Northwest Territories were more likely to be: younger, males, married, originally from Saskatchewan or Ontario; holders of degrees (elementary teachers); at higher salary levels, and more mobile. <p>Over 10 years, the general character of the northern teaching staff showed a trend towards a higher proportion of older, married men with longer training, and employed at higher salaries. The two variables which showed no appreciable change were the length of pre- northern experience, and length of tenure in northern teaching. Both fluctuated between a median of one and two years between 1960 and 1970. Median years of northern experience of teachers in the study was 2.1 years. <p>It was found that the only demographic variables significantly related to mobility were: age, salary, position, and location of school. Although such characteristics as sex, marital status, and previous experience showed some degree of relationship to mobility, they failed to be significant factors. <p>Items from the questionnaire were classified into six dissatisfaction factors. The factors and mean dissatisfaction score for each were: Personal and Economic, 3.001; Working Conditions, 3.200; Recruitment and Orientation, 3.142; Organizational Relationships, 3.159; Adminis tration, 3.284; Achievement, 3.612. Total mean dissatisfaction score was 3.295. Responses were on a five-point scale from (1) dissatisfaction, (2) to satisfaction. Means indicated that respondents in the study expressed more satisfaction than dissatisfaction with those factors investigated. <p>Analysis of the relationship of dissatisfaction to demographic characteristics and mobility found that: females were more dissatisfied than males; younger teachers with fewer years in the north were more dissatisfied than slightly older teachers; primary teachers were more dissatisfied than principals, vice-principals and high school teachers; low salaried teachers were more dissatisfied than higher salaried teachers. <p> In general, the non-mobiles appeared to be less dissatisfied than those who had left the north or intended to do so at the end of the year. It was obvious, however, from the low level of significance found in the analyses performed that dissatisfaction factors as used in this study were not the major reason for teacher mobility in the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec. The study was able to suggest such "unique" northern mobility factors as: lack of access to universities; the feeling of impermanence inherent in the northern living situation; isolation from social and cultural life of the south; intentions of being itinerant; difficulties of relating to culturally different pupils and community members. <p>This study indicated a need for further examination of northern teacher mobility with a focus on those factors unique to the northern teaching and living situation.
3

Factors related to teacher mobility in schools of the Northwest Territories and arctic Quebec, 1971-72

Koenig, Delores Mary 08 January 2007 (has links)
This study was designed to identify factors related to the mobility of teachers in the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec, and to explore the relationships among dissatisfaction factors, demographic characteristics of teachers, and mobility. <p>To obtain the data, the Teacher Mobility Questionnaire was constructed and mailed to northern teachers and to some teachers who had left the north in the past two years. The questionnaire consisted of items suggested by the literature on teacher mobility and its causes, as well as items considered appropriate from the author's previous experience in northern Canada. <p>The study sample consisted of 32 former northern teachers and 238 teachers employed in schools of the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec at the time of the study. Totals represented a 36 per cent return of completed, acceptable questionnaires. <p> The major areas of study were: a description of northern teachers on the basis of demographic characteristics; an examination of the relationships among demographic variables and mobility; identification of factors related to teacher dissatisfaction; exploration of the relationships among dissatisfaction factors and mobility; and the suggestion of the existence of "unique" northern mobility factors. Statistical procedures used to test hypotheses included correlation coefficients techniques; one-way analyses of variance; and Newman-Keuls comparisons between ordered means. <p>It was found that in comparison to teachers of the four western provinces, those in the Northwest Territories were more likely to be: younger, males, married, originally from Saskatchewan or Ontario; holders of degrees (elementary teachers); at higher salary levels, and more mobile. <p>Over 10 years, the general character of the northern teaching staff showed a trend towards a higher proportion of older, married men with longer training, and employed at higher salaries. The two variables which showed no appreciable change were the length of pre- northern experience, and length of tenure in northern teaching. Both fluctuated between a median of one and two years between 1960 and 1970. Median years of northern experience of teachers in the study was 2.1 years. <p>It was found that the only demographic variables significantly related to mobility were: age, salary, position, and location of school. Although such characteristics as sex, marital status, and previous experience showed some degree of relationship to mobility, they failed to be significant factors. <p>Items from the questionnaire were classified into six dissatisfaction factors. The factors and mean dissatisfaction score for each were: Personal and Economic, 3.001; Working Conditions, 3.200; Recruitment and Orientation, 3.142; Organizational Relationships, 3.159; Adminis tration, 3.284; Achievement, 3.612. Total mean dissatisfaction score was 3.295. Responses were on a five-point scale from (1) dissatisfaction, (2) to satisfaction. Means indicated that respondents in the study expressed more satisfaction than dissatisfaction with those factors investigated. <p>Analysis of the relationship of dissatisfaction to demographic characteristics and mobility found that: females were more dissatisfied than males; younger teachers with fewer years in the north were more dissatisfied than slightly older teachers; primary teachers were more dissatisfied than principals, vice-principals and high school teachers; low salaried teachers were more dissatisfied than higher salaried teachers. <p> In general, the non-mobiles appeared to be less dissatisfied than those who had left the north or intended to do so at the end of the year. It was obvious, however, from the low level of significance found in the analyses performed that dissatisfaction factors as used in this study were not the major reason for teacher mobility in the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec. The study was able to suggest such "unique" northern mobility factors as: lack of access to universities; the feeling of impermanence inherent in the northern living situation; isolation from social and cultural life of the south; intentions of being itinerant; difficulties of relating to culturally different pupils and community members. <p>This study indicated a need for further examination of northern teacher mobility with a focus on those factors unique to the northern teaching and living situation.
4

Factors related to teacher mobility in schools of the Northwest Territories and arctic Quebec, 1971-72

1972 December 1900 (has links)
This study was designed to identify factors related to the mobility of teachers in the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec, and to explore the relationships among dissatisfaction factors, demographic characteristics of teachers, and mobility. To obtain the data, the Teacher Mobility Questionnaire was constructed and mailed to northern teachers and to some teachers who had left the north in the past two years. The questionnaire consisted of items suggested by the literature on teacher mobility and its causes, as well as items considered appropriate from the author's previous experience in northern Canada. The study sample consisted of 32 former northern teachers and 238 teachers employed in schools of the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec at the time of the study. Totals represented a 36 per cent return of completed, acceptable questionnaires. The major areas of study were: a description of northern teachers on the basis of demographic characteristics; an examination of the relationships among demographic variables and mobility; identification of factors related to teacher dissatisfaction; exploration of the relationships among dissatisfaction factors and mobility; and the suggestion of the existence of "unique" northern mobility factors. Statistical procedures used to test hypotheses included correlation coefficients techniques; one-way analyses of variance; and Newman-Keuls comparisons between ordered means. It was found that in comparison to teachers of the four western provinces, those in the Northwest Territories were more likely to be: younger, males, married, originally from Saskatchewan or Ontario; holders of degrees (elementary teachers); at higher salary levels, and more mobile. Over 10 years, the general character of the northern teaching staff showed a trend towards a higher proportion of older, married men with longer training, and employed at higher salaries. The two variables which showed no appreciable change were the length of pre- northern experience, and length of tenure in northern teaching. Both fluctuated between a median of one and two years between 1960 and 1970. Median years of northern experience of teachers in the study was 2.1 years. It was found that the only demographic variables significantly related to mobility were: age, salary, position, and location of school. Although such characteristics as sex, marital status, and previous experience showed some degree of relationship to mobility, they failed to be significant factors. Items from the questionnaire were classified into six dissatisfaction factors. The factors and mean dissatisfaction score for each were: Personal and Economic, 3.001; Working Conditions, 3.200; Recruitment and Orientation, 3.142; Organizational Relationships, 3.159; Adminis tration, 3.284; Achievement, 3.612. Total mean dissatisfaction score was 3.295. Responses were on a five-point scale from (1) dissatisfaction, (2) to satisfaction. Means indicated that respondents in the study expressed more satisfaction than dissatisfaction with those factors investigated. Analysis of the relationship of dissatisfaction to demographic characteristics and mobility found that: females were more dissatisfied than males; younger teachers with fewer years in the north were more dissatisfied than slightly older teachers; primary teachers were more dissatisfied than principals, vice-principals and high school teachers; low salaried teachers were more dissatisfied than higher salaried teachers. In general, the non-mobiles appeared to be less dissatisfied than those who had left the north or intended to do so at the end of the year. It was obvious, however, from the low level of significance found in the analyses performed that dissatisfaction factors as used in this study were not the major reason for teacher mobility in the Northwest Territories and Arctic Quebec. The study was able to suggest such "unique" northern mobility factors as: lack of access to universities; the feeling of impermanence inherent in the northern living situation; isolation from social and cultural life of the south; intentions of being itinerant; difficulties of relating to culturally different pupils and community members. This study indicated a need for further examination of northern teacher mobility with a focus on those factors unique to the northern teaching and living situation.
5

Career mobility patterns of Oklahoma school superintendents /

McGinn, Mary. January 1989 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Tulsa, 1989.
6

The analysis of teacher lateral mobility within selected public school districts

Oliver, Ronald Lee January 2011 (has links)
Typescript (photocopy). / Digitized by Kansas Correctional Industries
7

Investigating the Distribution of Teacher Quality by Race/Ethnicity and Socioeconomic Status of Students by School in One Large School District

McGlohn, Robin 2012 May 1900 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between teacher quality variables, student demographic variables, and student performance in order to determine the influence teacher quality variables have on student performance in one large school district. The population for this study included 69 schools during the 2007-2008 school year within one large suburban school district. Included in this study were 47 elementary schools, 14 middle schools, and 8 high schools. In this three-phased study, descriptive correlations were examined, t-tests were conducted comparing each of the variable sets, and partial correlations were conducted in order to determine the strength of associations between teacher quality variables and student performance variables. Findings from this study showed several strong and significant associations. When comparing the highest and lowest quartile of schools based on average years of teaching experience, percentage of within-district transfers, and total teacher mobility, there was a significant difference seen in both the percentage of economically disadvantaged (ED) students and percentage of African American and Hispanic students combined. Further analysis showed a significant difference between the top and bottom quartiles of percentage of ED students and percentage of African American and Hispanic students combined and their performance in both math and reading. Findings showed that teaching experience was negatively associated with student performance in reading and math, however, there was a smaller association in math. Controlling for within-district teacher transfers had a small to medium association between African American and Hispanic students combined and commended performance or meeting standard in math and reading. When controlling for percentages of total teacher mobility (leavers + movers) from campuses, there was a strong negative, partial correlation between percentage of ED students and performance in math (commended only) and reading. Implications for practitioners include the need to improve school leadership, improve working conditions, provide more and better professional support, create incentives to work in challenging schools, improve preparation for work in challenging schools, streamline hiring placement policies, create a coherent set of policies to close the staffing gap, and provide greater funding targeted to student needs.
8

Upward mobility among school principals : an informal system investigation /

Terán, Rosemarie C. January 1982 (has links)
No description available.
9

The study of factors influencing teacher mobility in post-primary schools of Leribe, Lesotho.

Masoebe, Liteboho E. January 2003 (has links)
One of the practices in post-primary schools of Leribe is teacher movement between schools (Teacher Mobility). This study was intended to determine factors influencing teacher mobility in Leribe post-primary schools in Lesotho. Random sampling of heads of department, teachers (transferred and not transferred), and parent representatives was carried out from the target population of all heads of departments, all teachers in different categories, head teachers, deputy head teachers, education officers and parents representatives in the Leribe district. Samples were made up 18 head teachers and 18 deputy head teachers, 36 heads of department, 144 teachers (72 transferred and 72 not transferred), 36 parent representatives and 8 education officers. Two leaders of teachers unions were part of the sample. The study used both quantitative and qualitative research techniques in collecting data. Questionnaires were used to collect data from head teachers, deputy head teachers, and heads of department, teachers and parent representatives. Education officers and leaders of teachers unions were personally interviewed because they were fewer in number. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) was used to analyze the data and the following results were revealed by the study: The lack of facilities in schools and poor management of schools contributed to teacher mobility in the Leribe district. Teachers' preference of teaching near home and teaching in schools situated in urban areas. Unsatisfied teachers' needs and interests, lack of grants in schools and teachers' preference of teaching in better performing schools in examinations. Lack of co-operation among teachers themselves and between teachers and administration. The remaining teachers were negatively affected because of high teaching overloads. Disorganization of schools plans Students' academic performance was negatively affected. Respondents were aware of teacher mobility, however, they could not determine the extent at which it was happening. Suggestions by the respondents to address teacher mobility were as follows: Teachers must be involved in the affairs of the school and provision of equal facilities by stakeholders in all schools. Meeting teachers' needs and interests and creation of good working relationships in schools. Review of policies and rules in relation to teachers' transfers. From the findings it was noted that several factors contributed to teacher movements between schools in Lesotho and more particularly in the Leribe district. Teacher transfers were exacerbated by the teaching service regulation on transfer which allowed teachers to transfer to other schools whenever they deemed necessary. Recommendation for further research was that, research could be undertaken using a more qualitative approach in order to get in-depth information from the respondents. The further study could also be undertaken involving more than one district in the country to determine factors influencing teacher mobility in schools which the present might not have accomplished. / Thesis (M.Ed.)-University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2003.
10

Compulsory schooling in a decentralized setting : studies of the Swedish case /

Ahlin, Åsa. January 1900 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Uppsala Universitet, 2004. / Includes bibliographical references. Also available via the World Wide Web.

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