• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 13
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 25
  • 25
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Investigating Healthy Organizations: Development and Testing of a Public Organization Wellness Quotient (WQ)

Unknown Date (has links)
This dissertation investigates and further develops organization health theory in the context of public organizations. This is an important line of inquiry for two reasons. First, the healthy organizations literature and healthy organization theory is inchoate and lacks overall coherence (Dejoy et al., 2010), especially in public organization theory and research. As such many organization theorists have called for expansive solutions and insist this requires consideration of the collective and systemic interactive levels of analysis (Salanova et al., 2012; Schein, 2006). Second, we notice organizations now devoting considerable resources to nurturing individual and organizational health and wellness (Dale & Burrell, 2014; Parks & Steelman, 2008). Ostensibly, this is because health has been demonstrated to enhance or compromise a myriad of organizational outcomes including satisfaction, performance, sustainability, and survival (Pfeffer, 2010; Cooper, 1994). Moreover, organizational health and individual health share a vicarious and interdependent relationship (McHugh & Brotherton, 2000). In response to this “healthy exigency” and in effort to enhance the health of our public organizations, this dissertation employs an interdisciplinary lens to investigate healthy organizations at the systemic interactive level of analysis. The overarching purpose of the study is to provide theoretical contributions and empirical evidence concerning the key factors necessary for the development of healthy public organizations. To accomplish this, I assemble a holistic organizational wellness (HOW) theoretical framework. The HOW framework supports development of a Wellness Quotient (WQ) with data from the 2017 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FEVS). The WQ represents the dissertations main contribution, as currently no standardized measure of public organization health (or wellness) exists. Through a process of discovery and analysis which includes multiple iterations of confirmatory factor analyses and a regression analysis, it is found that the WQ has a significant impact on organization performance and satisfaction. The results also confirm this studies hypotheses the WQ may be useful as a proxy for future healthy public organizations research. In sum, the HOW framework and WQ not only contribute to theoretical and empirical development of healthy public organizations, respectively, but they both may serve as useful tools for public organizational health design and development. / Includes bibliography. / Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2019. / FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
2

On the design of organizational structures for command and control

January 1984 (has links)
Mileta M. Tomovic, Alexander H. Levis. / Bibliography: leaf [8] / "November 1984." / "...supported by the Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences under Contract Number MDA903-83-C-0196."
3

Planning for discontinuities

Thomas, Ramon L January 1980 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Alfred P. Sloan School of Management, 1980. / MICROFICHE COPY AVAILABLE IN ARCHIVES AND DEWEY. / Bibliography: leaves 129-132. / by Ramon L. Thomas. / M.S.
4

A mathematical analysis of planning, goal formulation, and resource allocation in an organizational system

Rzasa, Philip Vincent 05 1900 (has links)
No description available.
5

A case study of sociotechnical (QWL) intervention : a critique of the STS approach

Boyd, Catherine. January 1982 (has links)
No description available.
6

The bureau of research and reference in American school systems

Agunod, Nemesio L., January 1931 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Columbia University, 1931. / Vita. "Possibilitites of adaptation and application to Philippine educational conditions": p. 53-79.
7

Assessing differences in data and information makeup at two different organizational levels using two managerial jobs

Berube, D. Steven 03 March 2009 (has links)
In this research I tested for differences in data and information needs at two different organizational levels. I used the makeup of data and information to measure these differences. I first defined data, information, and the makeup of data and information, since the literature doesn't consistently define them. I selected endeavors as a surrogate for organizational levels, since endeavors relate to what managers do, not where managers are in the organization. I related data and information needs to different endeavors, and developed testable hypotheses to measure and test differences in data and information makeup for two different specific endeavors. I designed an experiment in which subjects ranked tasks (a strategic endeavor) and then used the same tasks to develop a weekly schedule for an employee (an operational endeavor). Subjects were selected from managers at Management Systems Laboratories, a research organization at Virginia Tech. As subjects performed the experiment, they were asked to verbalize what data and information they used off the test documents and how they used it to perform each endeavor. Using my definitions of the makeup of data and information, I found that subjects ranking tasks used 1) more information as a percentage of all data and information used; 2) more references to evaluate each indicator; and 3) more references external to the task scope, expressed as a percent of an references used, than subjects developing a weekly schedule. I was not able to show that managers ranking tasks use more data and information than managers developing a weekly schedule. / Master of Science
8

Applying the management system model to a federal government organization

Mallak, Larry A. 02 March 2010 (has links)
This research develops and applies a set of measurements to assess organizational system balance. The Management System ;Vlodcl (;\ISM), consisting of "who manages," "what is managed," and "what is used to manage," supplies the basis for defIning balance. Balance requires the system to regain stability at an equal or higher level when brought out-of-balance by change. This is exploratory research, examining management systems for correlations among related characteristics. Discovery of correlations helps in the understanding of management system behavior, and can lead to hypotheses on cause-and-effect relationships. Four C .S. Department of Energy subagencies were used as case studies for the management system analysis. The set of instruments used in this analysis provided a good first-cut at defining and describing balance for management systems. Two of the cases were found marginally balanced. The other two were marginally out-of-balance. Failure to achieve balance is analyzed by looking at results for conditions of balance between components of the management system. These conditions represent matches of important criteria, such as information portrayal formats, organization-compatible decision styles, and data capture. Balance should be measured, over time, to see if the management system analysis led to improvement. Various instruments were used to assess these balance conditions, including the MyersBriggs Type Indicator and the Driver Decision Style Exercise. / Master of Science
9

Designing organization structures : review of current theories, and applications to the construction industry

Szwarcbard, Avraham Arie. January 1979 (has links)
Thesis: M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Civil Engineering, 1979 / Bibliography: leaves 113-116. / by Avraham Arie Szwarcbard. / M.S. / M.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Civil Engineering
10

A case study of sociotechnical (QWL) intervention : a critique of the STS approach

Boyd, Catherine January 1982 (has links)
No description available.

Page generated in 0.1707 seconds