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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The lived experience of nurse advocates a Heideggerian hermeneutical analysis /

Baker, Christine Ann. January 1993 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1993. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 140-153).
2

Mental health social workers : strategies for social justice advocacy in a hospital setting

Enros, Brynn Marie. January 2005 (has links)
This qualitative, quasi-phenomenological study presents strategies and methods hospital-based mental health social workers utilize to promote social justice and advocate for their clients. Three frontline mental health social workers and one mental health department head were interviewed. The findings of this research demonstrated that the participating social workers utilized a variety of creative and flexible approaches to promote social justice and successfully advocate for their clients. These approaches included: the use of appropriate language, using the system against itself, developing written standards and regulations for their tasks, and forming a network of allies.
3

Mental health social workers : strategies for social justice advocacy in a hospital setting

Enros, Brynn Marie. January 2005 (has links)
No description available.
4

Konflikt eller harmoni? : individuella rättigheter och ansvarsutkrävande i svensk och brittisk sjukvård /

Karlsson, Lars, January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (doctoral)--Göteborgs universitet, 2003. / Extra t.p. with thesis statement and English abstract inserted. Includes bibliographical references (p. 303-319).
5

Konflikt eller harmoni? individuella rättigheter och ansvarsutkrävande i svensk och brittisk sjukvård /

Karlsson, Lars, January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (doctoral)--Göteborgs universitet, 2003. / Extra t.p. with thesis statement and English abstract inserted. Includes bibliographical references (p. 303-319).
6

The development of new instruments to assess and predict patient involvement in medical decision-making

Curran, Leah Jane. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (D.C.P. / M. Sc.)--School of Psychology, Faculty of Science, University of Sydney, 2007. / Title from title screen (viewed on February 3, 2009) Degree awarded 2007; thesis submitted 2006. Submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Clinical Psychology/Master of Science to the School of Psychology, Faculty of Science. Includes bibliographical references. Also issued in print.
7

Nurses' perceptions of their empowerment to be patient advocates /

Squires Ruelokke, Violet Doreen, January 1999 (has links)
Thesis (M.N.)--Memorial University of Newfoundland, School of Nursing, 1999. / Typescript. Bibliography: p. 100-113.
8

Too Many Choices Confuse Patients With Dementia

Hamdy, R. C., Lewis, J. V., Kinser, Amber, Depelteau, A., Copeland, Rebecca, Kendall-Wilson, T., Whalen, K. 01 December 2017 (has links)
Choices are often difficult to make by patients with Alzheimer Dementia. They often become acutely confused when faced with too many options because they are not able to retain in their working memory enough information about the various individual choices available. In this case study, we describe how an essentially simple benign task (choosing a dress to wear) can rapidly escalate and result in a catastrophic outcome. We examine what went wrong in the patient/caregiver interaction and how that potentially catastrophic situation could have been avoided or defused.
9

Ethical Considerations in Access to Experimental Drugs for Treatment Use

Rakowski, Sonja K 28 September 2010 (has links)
Do dying patients have a moral claim to access experimental drugs when all else has failed? This question has been the focus of an active and evolving debate concerning the rights of terminally ill patients, the nature of the drug development process, and the scope of federal regulation, with supporters arguing that seriously ill patients should be able to decide for themselves whether and when to attempt experimental therapies and opponents arguing that the resulting state of affairs would be disastrous for patient safety and for the integrity of the drug development process. This thesis concerns the ethical considerations surrounding the provision of experimental drugs for treatmentoften termed compassionate use or expanded accessand argues that compelling ethical merits on both sides of the debate complicate the formation of satisfactory public policy. Although patient autonomy is often invoked to support liberal access to experimental drugs, the paucity of known information about investigational compounds as well as the unique vulnerability of the terminally ill patient call into question the wisdom of the unfettered exercise of autonomy in this context. Although equitable distribution of experimental drugs is often felt to be a concern, the meaning of equity in this context has not been clearly defined, and in fact several working concepts of equitable access may not be achievable or desirable. Although the financial burden on drug manufacturers is frequently recognized as a barrier to expanded access, the potential for expanded access programs to constitute a marketing strategy should be recognized, and the mixing of profit motives with altruistic ones brought to light. Parsing these and other ethical nuances points to certain ways in which policies governing expanded access can be refined to allow for access while maximizing patient protection and ensuring the generation of scientific knowledge. Physicians, as frequent mediators of requests for experimental drugs, should be knowledgeable of the ethical issues inherent and should help to ensure the judicious use of experimental therapies. Finally, general misconceptions about the benefits of experimental therapy, pervasive in our culture, heighten the contentiousness of this debate. A workable legislative solution should be accompanied by a thoughtful and deliberate effort to educate patients, their advocates, and broader society about the realistic pace of drug development and the limits of modern medicine. This thesis recognizes that individuals who seek expanded access often have valid moral claims to do so, but advocates a cautious attitude toward the dissemination of experimental drugs for treatment and maintains the importance of government and physician participation in adjudicating access.
10

Patients' and significant others' satisfaction with nursing activities in oncology ambulatory settings

Malkin, Lisa Sohl January 1988 (has links)
No description available.

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