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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
21

Art teachers' careers and career perceptions

Bennet, C. January 1987 (has links)
No description available.
22

Persepsies van misdaad in voorheen benadeelde gemeenskappe : die Thusano-projek / Karen van der Berg

Van der Berg, Karen January 2005 (has links)
This research falls within the scope of the Thusano project to evaluate families concerning a variety of aspects of which this research specifically focuses on crime. Crime therefore is an act that must take place contradictory to the judicial system. The aim of the research is to determine the causes of the perceptions of the community with regard to crime, to identify the crimes that occurs most and to determine how crime in this community can be reduced. Through this research it was found that an increase has occurred with reference to certain crime categories, such as violent crime, women abuse and house theft. The community is of opinion that heavier punishment will lead to prevention of crime and to more job opportunities. Alcohol abuse also plays a large role in the assaults that take place during weekends. Furthermore they believe that, with the assistance of the police and the community, crime can decrease. / Thesis (M.A. (MW))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2006.
23

Cross-cultural Perceptions of Physiognomy : Single-factor Variation

Turner, Billy M. 08 1900 (has links)
The problem of this study is to compare character judgments of a sample Korean population with character judgments of a sample American population, based upon viewing a sample of Caucasian photographs. Both Korean and American sample populations and photographs comprising the instrument are determined by random sampling techniques.
24

Declining Participation in Fraternity and Sorority Life: a Comparison of Perceptions of Greek-lettered Organizations Between Affiliated and Non-affiliated Students

Shirley, Zachary E. 05 1900 (has links)
This quantitative study was used to determine the perceptions that may have caused a decline in membership in fraternities and sororities and to examine active organization involvement between affiliated and unaffiliated students at a single higher education institution in northeast Texas. Eight perceptions were given regarding fraternity and sorority life and why students chose to remain unaffiliated with fraternities or sororities. The instrument used was a modified version of the Extracurricular Involvement Inventory, created by Winston and Massaro (1987) and was administered to participants online via Survey Monkey. There were 206 participants total: 55.3% were female, and 44.7% were male. Regarding ethnicities, 47.0% were African American, 37.5% were Caucasian, and 15.5% were Hispanic/Latino. Out of the participants, 20.9% were in their freshman or sophomore year, 23.8% were juniors, 33.5% were seniors, and 21.8% were graduate students. Participants’ ages ranged from 18 to 32, with a mean of 22.89 (SD = 2.81). The research questions were analyzed using two techniques: logistic regression for the first question and multiple regression for the second question. Findings for the first research question indicated that lack of values, lack of diversity, poor academic attitudes, and a requirement of too much time were primary reasons unaffiliated students chose not to join a fraternity or sorority. Findings for the second question indicated that Greek-affiliated students averaged higher involvement intensity scores when compared to unaffiliated students. Practical implications and future research are discussed.
25

Primary Care Provider's Perceptions of Spirometry Use for Diagnosis and Management of COPD

Shah, Krupa Rashmin, Shah, Krupa Rashmin January 2017 (has links)
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a leading cause of death worldwide and requires close monitoring and follow up to prevent exacerbations that lead to hospitalizations (CDC, 2015). COPD is often underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed for asthma and also under-treated because providers are not utilizing the recommended diagnostic tool, spirometry, for patients who present with chronic respiratory symptoms (Decramer et al., 2015). The purpose of this study is to assess perceived barriers to spirometry use among primary care providers (PCP) including nurse practitioners (NP) and physician assistants (PA) within Arizona. The aim of this project is to assess for commonalities in barriers and determine practice and educational implications and areas for future research to increase knowledge about the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) Guidelines so that spirometry is performed more frequently. A survey was administered to PCPs (NPs and PAs) in Arizona through medical professional organizations. Basic demographic data was collected, in addition to questions assessing practice assessment, perceived barriers to spirometry, and utilization of smoking cessation methods and COPD prevention methods. A total of 47 responses were used for the data analysis. Females accounted for 87% (n=41) of the total sample size, and males accounted for 13% (n=6). There were 89% (n=42) NPs and 11% (n=5) PAs. Only 53% (n=25) stated that they have access to a spirometer and 47% (n=22) stated they did not have access to the tool. The most common barriers to spirometry use were concerns about testing quality and accuracy (28%, n=13), cost of the tool (23%, n=11), uncertainty about interpretation (21%, n=10), and unfamiliarity (21%, n=10). Other causes include concerns for reimbursement (11%, n=6), not enough time with patient (11%, n=5), preference to send for pulmonary function tests (11%, n=5), and lastly uncertain about impact of results on clinical practice (6%, n=3). In conclusion, the results call for further practice and educational interventions to mitigate these barriers and provide better support to providers who care for those with chronic respiratory symptoms. Further research into this issue can help lead to interventions and increase knowledge about the GOLD guidelines to improve patient outcomes.
26

Does Conforming Make Us More Liked? Perceptions of Conformist and Non-conformist Behaviour

Leone, Tullia 30 August 2010 (has links)
Although social psychologists have long argued that conformity is motivated by a concern for social approval, very few studies have tested whether conformity actually results in increased approval of the conformist. The present research examined participants’ evaluations of confederates who displayed either conformist or non-conformist behaviour. Studies 1 and 2 used a music task, in which remote confederates either conformed or did not conform to participants’ choices for favourite music clips. Participants evaluated confederates by rating them on a series of both positive and negative descriptors. Relative to non-conformists, conformists were rated more favourably on items that referred to ‘liking’ (e.g., likeableness, willingness to befriend) (Studies 1 & 2), and less favourably on items that referred to “independence” (e.g., independence, originality, strength) (Study 2). Interestingly, although conforming confederates were judged as less independent than were confederates who simply agreed with (rather than conformed to) participants’ choices, conformity did not have a positive effect on liking over and above mere agreement (Study 2). Conformity, rather than being a means of gaining approval, might be better construed as a means of avoiding disapproval. Study 2 further examined evaluations made by observers who were exposed to the same confederate behaviours as were targets; however, no observer-target difference in ratings was found. Study 3 assessed the degree to which participants valued the traits that they ascribed to people who demonstrated either conformist or non-conformist behaviour. Positive traits associated with conformist behaviour (e.g., agreeableness, cooperativeness) were reported as having a more positive effect on participants’ liking of a person than were positive traits associated with non-conformist behaviour (e.g., independence, originality). Furthermore, in determining their liking for a conformist, participants reported placing more importance on the conformist’s possessing the positive traits associated with conforming than on their possessing the negative traits associated with conforming (e.g., dependence, passivity). In spite of their lack of independence, therefore, conformists in Study 2 were liked because participants placed more value on the virtuous aspects of conformity (e.g., agreeableness, cooperativeness). Implications for our culture’s ambivalent attitudes toward both conformity and independence are discussed.
27

Practice environment perceptions of first-line managers of nursing

Klebeck, Signy Lenore Bjornson 28 August 2006
As the health care system experienced a complex tapestry of transitions in the past decade, first-line managers (FLMs) strived to maintain a sense of stability for themselves and their staff in chaotic work environments. Individuals across the nation are striving to ensure health care team members have quality work environments. The paucity of literature examining the perceptions FLMs have of their work environment prompted this study. <p>This study provided FLMs employed in regional and provincial hospitals in Saskatchewan a voice to share their perceptions of their work environments with others. It is an adaptation of the descriptive survey design used by Remus, Smith, and Schissel (2000) in their study of staff nurses. The adaptation was based on the literature, making it applicable to FLMs, and incorporating the six Quality Worklife Indicators (QWI) of the Canadian Nurses Associations (CNAs) Quality Professional Practice Environments framework. The questionnaire also incorporated open-ended questions that enabled respondents to elaborate on their perceptions of their work environments.<p>The total population of 113 FLMs in regional (FLMRs) and provincial (FLMPs) hospitals in Saskatchewan was invited to participate in this study. Sixty-nine respondents (61.1%) chose to do so. FLMRs had a higher, although not significant, response rate, (67.6% n=23) than did FLMPs (58.2% n=46). The researcher attempted to make personal contact and correspond with each invited participant when distributing the questionnaires. In the open ended questions, participants in this study described intertwined multidimensional roles and responsibilities resulting in unmanageable workloads. They faced daily challenges involving relationships, putting out fires, balancing system/personnel relationships, staffing issues, resources, time, and salary. FLMs who successfully resolved their challenges felt a sense of accomplishment or reward, increasing their self confidence in their ability to successfully fill their roles as a FLM. FLMs described that being a change agent, teamwork, recognition by others, relationships, working with patients, and control over practice as the most rewarding elements within in their practice environments. The Environment Perception Scale responses reflected positive perceptions of work environments on all subscales except control over workload. Overall, FLMPs had a slightly more positive perception of their work environments than did FLMRs, except on the control over workload subscale. However, there were no significant differences between the groups except on the innovation and creativity subscale, where FLMRs scored significantly lower.<p>Study results offer senior administrators, professional associations, government, educators, and others an opportunity to increase their understanding and awareness of the perceptions FLMs have of their practice environment. Awareness of these perceptions will facilitate supporting or strengthening the rewards FLMs perceive in their practice environments, resulting in a richer practice environment. Identification and awareness of the perceived challenges is the first step in addressing them. Educators will find these results useful in better preparing future leaders of nursing for formal management roles.
28

Does Conforming Make Us More Liked? Perceptions of Conformist and Non-conformist Behaviour

Leone, Tullia 30 August 2010 (has links)
Although social psychologists have long argued that conformity is motivated by a concern for social approval, very few studies have tested whether conformity actually results in increased approval of the conformist. The present research examined participants’ evaluations of confederates who displayed either conformist or non-conformist behaviour. Studies 1 and 2 used a music task, in which remote confederates either conformed or did not conform to participants’ choices for favourite music clips. Participants evaluated confederates by rating them on a series of both positive and negative descriptors. Relative to non-conformists, conformists were rated more favourably on items that referred to ‘liking’ (e.g., likeableness, willingness to befriend) (Studies 1 & 2), and less favourably on items that referred to “independence” (e.g., independence, originality, strength) (Study 2). Interestingly, although conforming confederates were judged as less independent than were confederates who simply agreed with (rather than conformed to) participants’ choices, conformity did not have a positive effect on liking over and above mere agreement (Study 2). Conformity, rather than being a means of gaining approval, might be better construed as a means of avoiding disapproval. Study 2 further examined evaluations made by observers who were exposed to the same confederate behaviours as were targets; however, no observer-target difference in ratings was found. Study 3 assessed the degree to which participants valued the traits that they ascribed to people who demonstrated either conformist or non-conformist behaviour. Positive traits associated with conformist behaviour (e.g., agreeableness, cooperativeness) were reported as having a more positive effect on participants’ liking of a person than were positive traits associated with non-conformist behaviour (e.g., independence, originality). Furthermore, in determining their liking for a conformist, participants reported placing more importance on the conformist’s possessing the positive traits associated with conforming than on their possessing the negative traits associated with conforming (e.g., dependence, passivity). In spite of their lack of independence, therefore, conformists in Study 2 were liked because participants placed more value on the virtuous aspects of conformity (e.g., agreeableness, cooperativeness). Implications for our culture’s ambivalent attitudes toward both conformity and independence are discussed.
29

Practice environment perceptions of first-line managers of nursing

Klebeck, Signy Lenore Bjornson 28 August 2006 (has links)
As the health care system experienced a complex tapestry of transitions in the past decade, first-line managers (FLMs) strived to maintain a sense of stability for themselves and their staff in chaotic work environments. Individuals across the nation are striving to ensure health care team members have quality work environments. The paucity of literature examining the perceptions FLMs have of their work environment prompted this study. <p>This study provided FLMs employed in regional and provincial hospitals in Saskatchewan a voice to share their perceptions of their work environments with others. It is an adaptation of the descriptive survey design used by Remus, Smith, and Schissel (2000) in their study of staff nurses. The adaptation was based on the literature, making it applicable to FLMs, and incorporating the six Quality Worklife Indicators (QWI) of the Canadian Nurses Associations (CNAs) Quality Professional Practice Environments framework. The questionnaire also incorporated open-ended questions that enabled respondents to elaborate on their perceptions of their work environments.<p>The total population of 113 FLMs in regional (FLMRs) and provincial (FLMPs) hospitals in Saskatchewan was invited to participate in this study. Sixty-nine respondents (61.1%) chose to do so. FLMRs had a higher, although not significant, response rate, (67.6% n=23) than did FLMPs (58.2% n=46). The researcher attempted to make personal contact and correspond with each invited participant when distributing the questionnaires. In the open ended questions, participants in this study described intertwined multidimensional roles and responsibilities resulting in unmanageable workloads. They faced daily challenges involving relationships, putting out fires, balancing system/personnel relationships, staffing issues, resources, time, and salary. FLMs who successfully resolved their challenges felt a sense of accomplishment or reward, increasing their self confidence in their ability to successfully fill their roles as a FLM. FLMs described that being a change agent, teamwork, recognition by others, relationships, working with patients, and control over practice as the most rewarding elements within in their practice environments. The Environment Perception Scale responses reflected positive perceptions of work environments on all subscales except control over workload. Overall, FLMPs had a slightly more positive perception of their work environments than did FLMRs, except on the control over workload subscale. However, there were no significant differences between the groups except on the innovation and creativity subscale, where FLMRs scored significantly lower.<p>Study results offer senior administrators, professional associations, government, educators, and others an opportunity to increase their understanding and awareness of the perceptions FLMs have of their practice environment. Awareness of these perceptions will facilitate supporting or strengthening the rewards FLMs perceive in their practice environments, resulting in a richer practice environment. Identification and awareness of the perceived challenges is the first step in addressing them. Educators will find these results useful in better preparing future leaders of nursing for formal management roles.
30

Re-verification for percedent cause modes of organizational politics consciousness--Two domestic and large-scale of private finance organizations contemplated for verification

Chen, Hung-shu 18 November 2003 (has links)
During decades, the definitions of organizational politics are different by many researches of organizational politics. And also, the limitations of behave of organizational politics are in confusion or divisive. In an enterprise¡¦s business, the employer may demand his¡]her¡^staff to work well, however, his or her staff may work in accordance with politic behave within organization. The problems are that what kind of environment shall make the staff to act relative response to it so-called ¡§Consciousness of fact¡¨ but not for ¡§Reality of fact¡¨, and what concerns shall be involved about? These issues are worthily to study. I, the author currently serving in finance industry, I¡¦ve felt that there are great shocks generated or gave directly to the organizational tradition culture or employee¡¦s mental adjustment of finance organization since the stipulation of ¡§Finance Control Law¡¨ for which has forced the existing financial organizations to adopt combination or consolidation measures. This study has proposed two domestic and large-scale of private finance organizations for verification. The sampling of separated levels ratio is applied, 286 questionnaires were issued and 251 questionnaires were availably replied. Before final verification, these questionnaires were statistically analyzed by difference, relativity and multi-recovery etc, and following points were concluded. 1. After explorative research, the organizational politics consciousness is mainly divided as three aspects. ¡]1¡^The behave of political consciousness for high rank and colleague. ¡]2¡^The behave of political consciousness for qualification promotion policy ¡]3¡^The behave of political consciousness for silence with personal benefit. 2. The difference of individual variety to organizational politics consciousness. ¡]1¡^Age, qualification and leadership are totally have obvious difference to organizational politics consciousness. ¡]2¡^Leadership has obvious difference to the three aspects of organizational politics consciousness respectively. ¡]3¡^Age only has obvious difference to the aspect of high rank and colleague, of organizational politics consciousness. ¡]4¡^Qualification hasn¡¦t obvious different to the three aspects of organizational politics consciousness. 3. The outcome of influential assumed verification Follows were found after multi-recovery analysis¡G Individual variety¡]Markivillism, A type human characteristic, leadership¡^ Organization¡¦s construction¡]Specialization¡^ Working feature¡]Interactive relation, promotion opportunity, integration¡^ Upon explanation, the seven varieties above have 41.2% variety volume relatively to the organizational politics consciousness.

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